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1

Following on from Shev's really good answer, other facets are to be able to play each song at different tempos, and in different keys. Often jazz players 'mess around' with standards, and use different tempos, and sometimes time sigs change, just for fun - or a challenge. Keys will change for songs as they become dependent on the vocalist. "I know xyz is in ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...


0

Studying theory and learning your scales will help a lot but you also need to practice playing by ear. Start by just trying to pick out the melodies of some of your favorite songs. At first you will struggle but, like anything else, with practice it will get easier. As you get better at this try putting a music channel on the radio and just sit at the ...


-1

This question is probably no longer active, but should anyone look, here are some of the more detailed points that I have found. Hertz It is suggested that the human ear can have a sensitivity of up to 1 Hz. Good sounding chords are ones that have wavelengths that match sufficiently enough so that the ear cannot tell the difference. If you wanted to ...


1

Improvisations is at its core completion of a melody. That questions you do in your theory exams is there for a reason. If you can get some training in the writing of melodies and take that training into your playing then you will have the basics down to such an extent where you can improvise to any given music.


3

This is a very broad question, and each individual subquestion is very broad by itself, but I'll try to point you in the right direction. You should grab a copy of either Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" or Robert Rawlins' "Jazzology". In my experience, those are the most recommended general jazz theory books. Check reviews in Amazon and similar sites ...



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