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1

In most tunes, four bars is the smallest unit you will find a complete phrase, musical idea, or melody. although you will often see it in eight as well (a complete chorus or bridge or A section of the tune), but youll never see it in two because two bars is too short to express a complete musical idea.


2

Just a few notes: What Tim describes as "a boogie pattern" some people call the money-walk and it varies slightly, sometimes walking half-steps up and down from the 3rd to the 5th and occasionally touching on the flattened 5th. Play around with this one, it's (over)used in 50s and 60s rock quite a bit. A common country bass-line (some call it the eat-shit ...


5

There's a boogie pattern 1-3-5-6-b7-6-5-3- used for 12 bar blues. Walking bass patterns (usually on each beat) use all the notes from the scale of the key you're in,- you can use any order, preferably starting a bar with the root note. Theory says that there's a good chance one or two of the other notes in the bar will fit the chord, even random notes ! But ...


0

"Mood For A Day" is an acoustic solo guitar piece by Steve Howe on the Yes album Fragile. It is in B (harmonic) minor. It requires finger-style picking. This piece was my segue to Segovia; it is what I auditioned for my classical guitar teacher, although my performance was not as fluid as the original.


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What helped me was to think it terms of the vocal melody to get ideas for the solo. Use the vocal melody as a starting point and improvising will become much easier as you have a starting point. The listener will hear bits of the melody in the solo which give them a feeling of cohesiveness with the song. Hopefully this will give you a starting point to base ...


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I don't know if you would find many solos in Rock that is pure Major. Most would reference the Pentatonic, Lydian, or Mixolydian scales. I would say that Jessica or Melissa from Allman Brothers would be solos and licks to check out. I'm thinking Don't Stop Believing from Journey would be one to look at.


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TL;DR: Learn solos you like. Practice the things that are important to you. Keep practicing. The number one lesson I learned from playing the guitar is that practice works, but it takes time and there are no shortcuts. Longer version: What worked for me was learning other people's solos that I liked. And continue to practice them. One of the first ...


0

I think that you should improve your skills up to a level where you can have the melody of the solo in your head and be able to transpose it directly on the guitar. This requires a lot of practice. As my guitar teacher says "The music doesn't come from your fingers, it comes from your head." So going up and down the scales doesn't mean/do anything (i.e. ...


0

It seems to be difficult to get a straight answer to "how do I solo in major?". I can play the blues blindfolded in my sleep, but soloing over a major progression has been troublesome, and dropping down to the actual "relative minor" position three frets down was disastrous. None of the usual "tricks" seem to work there. I tried reverting back to my modes ...


0

there are two important aspects of soloing: phrasing and selection of good target tones. Spend time with the pentatonic scale working on these two aspects. The pentatonic scale works over most chords in the key, so that's why it's the best starting point. Work on making "meaningful" phrases with the pentatonic scale, using specific tones you choose from that ...


0

This is a bit like this post : What is the best way to learn scales in order to improve improvisation/writing of lead guitar parts? My answer was to 'gain inspiration' from either other guitarists or from within yourself (by deciding how your solo will sound in advance). From what you describe, you have a knowledge of scales and technique. However just ...


13

Learning licks and solos by other musicians can be helpful in this respect. Obviously you'll want to develop your own voice, but no musician exists in a vacuum and it's definitely helpful to learn and analyze (if even unconsciously) the kinds of things musicians you admire have played. Depending on your style and the direction you want to go, it may be ...



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