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Also listen to blues artists that you like. Look at transcriptions and you will see the scale parts being used over the chord changes. You will notice in the key of E that the E pentatonic minor scale is used over all chords for tension. Start with a basic minor pentatonic scale in E first then try the major pentatonic to hear the difference of major/minor ...


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In E, the minor blues scale notes are E, G, A, Bb, B, D. In A, the minor blues scale notes are A, C, D, Eb, E, G. In B, the minor blues scale notes are B, D, E, F, F#, A. You can see there are some common notes - A, D and E being them.Theoretically, if you only played these, they would work over all 3 chords. But the tune may start to get boring! Not all ...


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You could use either. When soloing you would want to center the notes you play around the chord being played. The E major and minor pentatonic scale contains the notes E, F#, G, G#, A, B, C#, and D. The notes in a E7 are E, G#, B, and D the notes of an A7 are A, C#, E, G, and the notes of a B7 are B, D#, F#, and A. Of all the notes used in the 3 chords, ...


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Check out Scott's Bass Lessons https://www.scottsbasslessons.com/. He creates educational videos for all abilities. Most of his videos are free but he also has a paid for area with access to more resources.


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Yes, it's crucial that the musicians are listening to each other and responding. Usually there is no preconceived idea or structure. In fact, to have 'an empty mind' is ideal. It will be counter productive to play ready-made riffs or cliche licks, or even to play in a particular key unless this is what is going on in the room. It's likely that the musicians ...


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I play in multiple jams weekly, which I do because it is such a challenge. It's important to have a decent idea of the various standard chord changes that are particular to the styles of music you like. For the blues it's pretty easy, as they're typically I, IV, V chords, or their alternates, which repeat in various ways. Throwing in 7th and 9th chords ...


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Try listening attentively to the rhythm the drummer play. He lays down the general rhythm and you expand upon his ideas. If he plays a general 4/4 beat try soloing with this in mind. It also helps if you practice with a metronome as it will teach you some great skills on how to play in time. Also you and your band mates may find worth in playing slowly at ...


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So you can produce some musical putput which pleases you, fairly regularly. More easily, when you have the luxury of time, and not so much under the pressure of the moment in a jam session. It's pretty much the same skill, you just have to be further along the road to have it on tap instantaneously. You say you can improvise melodies vocally on the fly ...


1

I'm assuming you have a core tune you've written and you want to add a solo. If so, then my suggestion is to put down the guitar, put on the headphones, and listen to the song for... weeks or months if that's what it takes. Start to hear a solo in your head. When you have a very accurate "sonic vision" of the solo you want, then grab the guitar and find ...


1

The guitar neck is a featureless grid of notes. The vast majority of music is played in a key (which if you read about the history of music, and in particular pythagorean tuning, is fundamental to the way frequency ratios between notes work.) You only need to learn one scale by rote: the pentatonic. That will give you a sense of where 'home' is on the neck ...


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I learned all the music theory I know (not much, but enough to get by), and a lot of great stuff about how chords (and thus solos) are built, from this pretty awesome...comic book: http://www.planetalkguitar.com/ The author is a professional guitarist who never worries about scales - the whole book is about chord tones (which like everything else in music, ...


2

Not learning scales is like being a weightlifter who ignores leg day. They are in some ways the most boring thing you can do, but fundamental in more subtle ways than you may realize. I would say scales are not important because they are the fundamental unit of music theory (which may be wrong but the first years of music theory pedagogy can imply it), but ...


1

There are plenty of arguments for learning scales, and some against. I've played with many,many musos (and loads of guitarists !!), some of whom know scales, some don't. It's often not possible to decide which camp an individual is in when they play. There are great players out there who play 'from the soul' and haven't a clue about scales, keys or theory of ...


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tl;dr: You can always guess what notes to play by ear and find what notes sound good, but at the end of the day you are playing in a scale and you should be aware of that. There are some guitarists that don't know scale (or music theory for that matter) and they tend to play by ear. They listen to the progression and try to play something over it and ...


3

You seem to be mistaken in thinking that playing scales means you have to play the same scales as everyone else - you don't. In fact, even playing chords and/or arpeggios is a form of playing scales. A scale is, informally, nothing more than a system of dividing a range of frequencies into discrete steps. So saying you 'refuse' to learn scales is, in a ...


4

I think the most important thing you need is to learn how to dive in your guitar's neck without getting lost. Moving around past a certain speed and without watching where your fingers are requires tons of practice. That practice relies in repeating some pattern over and over and over. You can try 1 million solos, practice them, improve and master them and ...


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If you really want to understand how alcohol and caffiene affect the body then you need to take into account a great many things, and need to consider them rather as a stimulant and a depressant. There's an interesting point about coffee that it makes you perform better than without it... but only if you're a regular coffee drinker. The reason for this ...


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Great advice above, My preference is to start playing in whatever is a natural mode for you. You should try using your mind powers to get into the mood you want on the amped/mellow scale. Then after an hour or so of adrenaline and sounds pumping through you is a great time to have a puff or a drink. Extensive exercise can get you stuck in a mode and a ...



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