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You can isolate each note one by one and find chords that sound well with it. Now the trick is that the next chord must 'flow' nicely while coming from the previous one so that it won't sound like some random chords, but chords related to each other. There is a really interesting done by Publio Delgado here, that uses popular youtube videos and harmonizes ...


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Steps to improvising a melody from random notes: Sing the notes to yourself. See if by singing the notes over and over you spontaneously create a melody. See if a counter-melody suggests itself to you that responds to this spontaneous melody. Play the note sequence as stated Play any melody or counter-melody. Add connecting notes between the notes of ...


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Previous replies should answer a lot of your questions. The first three notes in your YouTube example are B, D and F. Those are the third, fifth, and seventh notes (chords) of the key of G. He is playing some kind of a G Major scale. It sounds like he plays G Major 7, D7 the V7 and the vii, F minor 7 flat V. It could be played as all 7th chords or other ...


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Great scene! Well, it happens that those notes fit on some scale. I don't know, let's say, for example, A major. So, this scale is composed of the notes A, B, C#, D, E, F# and G#. This gives you a framework to work with. With those notes, you can play chords and/or melodies. Each scale gives you a framework to improvise with.


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The easiest way to do it is write all the music for the scene before you shoot the movie! But seriously, this is pretty much the way that composing music has always been taught and learned. It's the same technique as learning a foreign language: you start by responding to simple musical ideas that only require a small musical "vocabulary" and "grammar", ...


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All diatonic modes are the same scale starting on different notes. While you can think of different modes for each chord, I find that approach to be way too complicated for live performance. Moreover, that approach tends to lead to playing scales rather than creating interesting and catchy melodies. Take the chord tones for each bar as your "strong" notes ...


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A melody is comprised of notes, usually from a particular key. Those notes could and often do, add up to the scale of that key, when put in order, with root first. Thus, in A, there'll be A,B,C#,D,E,F# and G#.So, a tune in A will use those notes in the main.Take any of those notes, and stack the next but one and the next but one to that, and maybe one more, ...


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That is totally a matter of style, given the combination you have there. If you wanted a Spanish guitar sound and kind of dark, use phrygian. If you want a jazzy/blues feeling, use Dorian. However, if you use Dorian with the minor chords toward the beginning of the progression, I would probably give Mixolydian a try on the major chord to maintain the bluesy ...


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A good way to practice would be to come up with an arbitrary chord progression in whatever key you like(eg. 1-4-5 in a major key). Loop that sequence. Then try and hit the "target notes" that make up each chord as they are played. Not saying you should be arpeggiating, but practice jumping notes on the scale and soloing while ending on a target note as each ...


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Without wanting to sound too abstract, I'd recommend learning guitar solos from musicians you enjoy listening too, then try to copy their ideas into your own improvisation. I think what is key is developing your "musical ear" where you can hear in your head what you want to play and know how to translate that onto the guitar. This takes many years of ...


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In the end you can use pretty much any arbitrary scales, switch between them and still sound awesome, as long as there's tasteful structure to it. For example if the song is currently in E minor, try putting in some phrases in D, F, F# or G major diatonic scales, but regularly return to the familiar Em pentatonic. My general advice would be to listen to ...


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Minor pent works well over major chords, but not vice versa. Add the 'blue' note to both maj. and min. pents for a little spice. Try the full major scale notes on major songs. Try the full minor scales (3 of them!) on minor songs. Use the Mixolydian mode for major songs. Use the Dorian mode for minor songs. Use the Lydian mode for major songs. On major songs ...


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The question is quite broad, however here are some tips: Familiarize yourself entirely with scales and arpeggios. As boring as it sounds, it is incredibly important to know your way around a piano. Don't just familiarize yourself with major scales, work with natural, harmonic, and melodic minor, and even the blues scales! It is also a good idea to work ...



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