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Also listen to blues artists that you like. Look at transcriptions and you will see the scale parts being used over the chord changes. You will notice in the key of E that the E pentatonic minor scale is used over all chords for tension. Start with a basic minor pentatonic scale in E first then try the major pentatonic to hear the difference of major/minor ...


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In E, the minor blues scale notes are E, G, A, Bb, B, D. In A, the minor blues scale notes are A, C, D, Eb, E, G. In B, the minor blues scale notes are B, D, E, F, F#, A. You can see there are some common notes - A, D and E being them.Theoretically, if you only played these, they would work over all 3 chords. But the tune may start to get boring! Not all ...


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You could use either. When soloing you would want to center the notes you play around the chord being played. The E major and minor pentatonic scale contains the notes E, F#, G, G#, A, B, C#, and D. The notes in a E7 are E, G#, B, and D the notes of an A7 are A, C#, E, G, and the notes of a B7 are B, D#, F#, and A. Of all the notes used in the 3 chords, ...


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Check out Scott's Bass Lessons https://www.scottsbasslessons.com/. He creates educational videos for all abilities. Most of his videos are free but he also has a paid for area with access to more resources.


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Yes, it's crucial that the musicians are listening to each other and responding. Usually there is no preconceived idea or structure. In fact, to have 'an empty mind' is ideal. It will be counter productive to play ready-made riffs or cliche licks, or even to play in a particular key unless this is what is going on in the room. It's likely that the musicians ...


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I play in multiple jams weekly, which I do because it is such a challenge. It's important to have a decent idea of the various standard chord changes that are particular to the styles of music you like. For the blues it's pretty easy, as they're typically I, IV, V chords, or their alternates, which repeat in various ways. Throwing in 7th and 9th chords ...


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Try listening attentively to the rhythm the drummer play. He lays down the general rhythm and you expand upon his ideas. If he plays a general 4/4 beat try soloing with this in mind. It also helps if you practice with a metronome as it will teach you some great skills on how to play in time. Also you and your band mates may find worth in playing slowly at ...


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So you can produce some musical putput which pleases you, fairly regularly. More easily, when you have the luxury of time, and not so much under the pressure of the moment in a jam session. It's pretty much the same skill, you just have to be further along the road to have it on tap instantaneously. You say you can improvise melodies vocally on the fly ...



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