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2

When you write that you've studied loads of scales and arpeggios but "I don't have many jazz heroes to borrow those licks from," it sounds to me like you are facing an obstacle faced by many young musicians today: with all the instructional material and fake books around, it is too easy to think you are learning the music without actually listening to the ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


7

Knowing what modes/scales to use over a chord can be approached a number of ways. Here's an over simplified way to know what scale you can use over a certain chord (DISCLAIMER: THIS IS OVERSIMPLIFIED): Is it Major? (R 3 5 7) Is the fourth sharped? (Yes - you might try Lydian) Otherwise, use Ionian or all of the above Is it Minor? (R b3 5 b7) Is the ...


1

In my opinion, finding a scale fitting in a chord is a nice solution for jazz improvisation. Any scale or modes which does not conflict with the chord is a good option, even if you can not name the scale. The scale you see in the video he used for A7#5b9 is an A Altered scale (thanks to Matt). The concept of this video is, improvise a scale starts from the ...


1

When I want to play a song, I listen to it again and again. And then again and again. Then I listen to some other artists playing the song. I listen to it many many times, so I can see how different everyone is playing it. Also, what I do is to try and sing the solos. I don't care if I sing the notes 100% correct 1, just what I can catch with my ear. ...


4

I think listening to and learning solos from your favourite guitarists is incredibly important. You will the form your own improvisational style as a mixture of players you really like (because you like their tone or style) and your own. Transcribing solos is a great way to fully understand how a player is interpreting a set of changes, and shows you ...


6

You can do all of the above. But I find it important to not overwhelm yourself with loads and loads of information. Find things that catch your ear and figure them out. Make up your own licks and shed them. They might not show up in your playing for months, or even years, but they will eventually bubble up to the surface, and will inform your concept of ...


3

Listen to Louis Armstrong. He often plays the melody, but never without a special touch, getting there a little early, leaving a little late. Adding a subtle filigree of ornamentation. Never overplaying. And don't let it bother you that he is a horn player and you are not. Satchmo has been the teacher of every kind of musician - guitar players, piano ...


0

I once asked Jimmy Hendrix what scales he thought of when playing solo's - he then gave me the best advice I ever got : he said "I don't think of scales, I close my eyes and go for it'. However, as a start point you may find this interesting..... http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-use-the-pentatonic-scale-in-a-lead-guitar-s.html


0

I don't know about that peice in particular, but yes, there is a type of music where, as you said: a soloist sings slowly without much of a repeated melody. In Arabic, it's called a "mawwal" (Arabic: موال). I know in Turkish it's "uzun hava" (according to what a Turkish friend told me). I'm sure it has different names in Krudish and Persian as well. It's ...



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