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2

I would call what you want to do - playing melodies by ear. It's easier to do on piano because of the logical way the keyboard is laid out. Ascending one key is always a semitone higher, descending lower. Piano was the first instrument I learned to play and I quickly developed the ability to play any melody by ear on the piano. With guitar, it took ten ...


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There are two components involved here. One is indeed ear training, and the other one is knowing your instrument well, i.e. being able to produce any melody as effortlessly as you do with your voice. And for this second part, you do not need to consciously know the intervals as long as you intuitively find the right notes on your instrument. But anyway, ...


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Good question. It depends on how you interpret music in your mind. I myself prefer scale degrees. If you can easily understand the space between the tonic and the actual notes, then you should choose the scale degrees also. However, you should really keep in mind that you have a good outcome.


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I do think some of the answers so far are awesome. Let me please add by indicating something I was taught in music school. The mode of a sequence of notes is also important, as the mode one is in can actually alter what the ear "hears." For example the relative minor of CM is Am. The "notes" are exactly the same when no accidentals are present, yet we hear ...


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It probably depends on how you 'hear' music. For example ... Absolute pitch : I have recently been playing with a folk vocalist who doen'st play an instrument so we spent a bit of time getting the song into the right key for her. Her first choice was always pretty much the orignal key of a recording she'd learnt from - any other key felt 'odd', implying ...


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Every guitar player is different so it depends. I have a friend who took piano lessons and read music before learning guitar and she would much rather know the names of the notes. I play based on sound and feel and knowing where to put my fingers relative to where they are now to get to the note I want next relative to the note I am on. But I have a ...


1

"Strong" melodic notes are notes that are in the chord being played, especially if they're played on the beats. Use your interval patterns as embellishments on the strong melodic notes that you play or as a way of breaking up or embellishing scalar runs. It's good in small doses. It's especially effective when you shred using very fast runs up and down ...


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With the guitar being a positional instrument, meaning one can play the same tune in many different keys but retain the same fingering and strings, merely moving where on the neck the tune is played, then knowing note names as the tune unfolds is not necessary. The relationship between the tonic and other notes, as far as where they are relatively speaking, ...


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I think it would be better to think the scale degrees. For instance, let's say you play E (V) and then Am (i); if you think in scale degrees, then you will lead the notes that consist the V (E major chord) to the tonic chord (A minor). This way, you make the listener believe that there is some connection between the notes you play. They are two degrees of ...


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how To use dorian mode??? for example You are in the key of (C) use ionian mode or C MAJOR SCALE D DORIAN MODE FOR (Dm) ETC. Now if you want to emphasize d dorian mode Use Dm as ur tonic or 1st chord followed by G major and use mixolydian mode or Am and play aeolian mode or natural minor scale. If u dont know mixolydian and aeolian just play dorian mode ...


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I noticed that Dorian works well in Oye Como Va by Santana. I wish I understood why it works so well in some minor arrangements but not so well in others. Oye Como Va seems to be Am while the Dorian mode would be playing G Major i believe


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These interval exercises are good for dexterity but in my opinion they are only of limited use when trying to improvise a melodic solo. The patterns sound too predictable when used without modifications. Furthermore, all notes of the scale are given the same weight (or importance), and this is usually not the most musical way of using the notes of a scale, ...


2

Any chord will have certain notes which will match it better than others. Using your C key example, C-E, E-G will work well, as those notes appear in the C chord. If you played C-E, D-F, E-G on beats 1, 2 and 3 of a bar it would sound fine. Starting on beat 1 with an appropriate pair of notes always works well. With 4ths, you'll have to be more picky. G-C ...


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Scales are just a starting point. Play with the scales major or minor pent. Are you playing over dominant 7 or 9 chords, you can try Mixolydian modes. I started by using just the minor pent of the I chord, then I started adding the major pent, then messed with Mixo mode. However, thinking about switching scales seemed needlessly complicated to me so I just ...



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