Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

It depends on the instrument. Digital electronic instruments are probably OK. String instruments, especially those with steel strings, will be seriously affected: Heat causes metal strings to expand - dropping the pitch. Heat causes other metal components, like truss rods, to expand and bend Materials other than metal also expand in heat (but to a lesser ...


5

You need to hire a professional piano tuner and repair person. It takes an expert with special tools and parts to fix a problem such as this correctly.


4

The sound won't change at all. I have seen people play guitars without a pick guard, straight through the body, leaving a new hole under the sound hole, and they still continue to play the instrument (though that will change the sound, haha). When you purchased that particular Martin, you paid for the choice materials, the quality of the construction, and ...


4

We have a very old Gibson mandolin, and we had a problem with some bugs. The bugs would eat some kind of glue that they used to make the mandolin, and it eventually collapsed in. When our mandolin was repaired a few years back, we left mothballs in the case for a while to keep anything out. The mandolin / case smell like mothballs now, but I haven't noticed ...


4

The humidity (or lack thereof) is a huge part of the equation here. Humidity control is essential for any fine instrument. Proper humidity keeps everything pliable, which in turn allows it to cope with fluctuating temperatures that are standard with winter and indoor heat. In my experience, it is the cheaper instruments (for example cheap acoustic ...


4

Adding to slim's answer, I've seen bridges pulled off acoustic guitars,strings break when not being played, bodies split because the wood has dried out,and necks spiral for the same reason.Some salvageable, some terminal.Apart from causing extra tuning problems, just don't do it. There should be a health warning issued with every new guitar ! One of my ...


4

A wooden instrument is ideally kept at about 40-60% humidity, so 45% is fabulous. This range is supposed to produce the best sound, and the least stress on the wood. But the absolute worst thing you can do is change up the humidity frquently and quickly, because this put stress on the wood and the seams. So if your instruments spend hours a day outdoors, ...


3

All pianos need tone regulation ("voicing") and action regulation from time to time, because of wear on the hammers and other parts. In your case, it's time.


3

For the silver there is no problem. You'll have more work to get it shiny and can reduce the amount of work needed before putting it into use again, by using a silver cleaning cloth from time to time. Liquid agents are difficult to apply, so that the pads don't get in contact. For the pads, unfortunately, there is not much you can do beside avoiding damp or ...


2

Thicker strings (aka higher gauge strings) do exert higher tension on the instrument. on a violin they will do this in two primary directions, one is is pulling the neck toward the tail piece, and the other is putting more pressure on the bridge. I don't think having higher gauge strings will make much of a difference, but you should make sure of two ...


2

I think it only adds to the character and value of a good instrument. See the recent trend of pre-distressed vintage electric guitars with premium prices, or the much older tradition of bowed violin-family instruments with no varnish on the back of the neck so it looks rubbed off, and one worn shoulder where the left hand rubs.


2

Cats and scratching... yeah, I can relate. A great way to get the cat to stop it is to drape duct-tape, sticky side out, all over the sides where the cat likes to scratch. The second the cat gets sticky tape on its paws it'll change its mind about how fun it is to scratch that particular "post" and will leave it alone. This doesn't hurt the cat at all; ...


2

My understanding is that the upper limit on relative humidity is set by the conditions which promote mould growth, around 70% RH (a reference for the 70% value), and not due to things like warping/splitting that you have to worry about with low humidity. I usually target 50% RH, year around. Martin guitars advocates 45%-55% for their instruments.


1

We've had some success - not on music gear (that stays behind closed doors) - but on walls by taping tin foil (aluminum foil) to the walls. The cats hate the sound of it, and I think they don't like how it feels. Plus it looks excellent.


1

I'm guessing the cat enjoys clawing the speaker mesh. Try leaving the amp. facing down on the floor. Is the socket a kettle plug sort ?


1

You can clean the silver with a silver polish cloth. Use these sticks to clean your ears for the hard to reach places. It's also important to keep your mechanics going smoothly. So buy a small bottle of special flute oil and put a little on the joints (hinges?). Use a cloth on a stick to dry out the inside of the flute after each time you play it. When ...


1

If you have a high-quality instrument, heavy strings shouldn't damage it. If your instrument is made out of cardboard or you're stringing it with steel power cables, things aren't so certain. Just don't do anything ridiculous; going up a gauge or two won't exceed the parameters of a decent instrument.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible