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9

Short answer: no. As a non-drying vegetable oil, it will eventually become rancid and not be fun. Same as safflower, peanut, sunflower, coconut, palm, etc. A better choice is a "drying oil" such as linseed oil, walnut oil, or a non-organic mineral oil or tung oil. Some folks have had good results using a citrus oil (orange, lemon) to clean, and then an ...


6

I'd shy away from anything not prescribed. One can use olive or linen oil to great effect on untreated wooden tables or breakfast plates: it gets sucked up in unbelievable amounts and then partly cracks and thickens, preserving the wood and making it impervious to stains. However, olive oil is acidic which would be bad news for frets and strings. And most ...


6

The difference really is noticeable to an experienced player. Depending on the experience level and even genre of music played, the effects may be noticed after only a few months of not cleaning, or after two years. It all depends. If an high school player is playing mostly the low rumbly notes of a concert band piece, they may not notice much affect at all, ...


5

I think it depends if you want to have it as an "active instrument" and play with it, or just keep it as a nice harmonica for memory/collection. I play in one of my projects with Filip Jers, he was sponsored by Hearing harmonicas and now Suzuki harmonicas, and he tunes his harmonicas every other show. Open, clean the reads, scratch them to fix tuning, oil ...


5

Olive oil, or any other vegetable-based oil, is not recommended for oiling any wood as it may go bad, or rancid, after a while. Most commercially available fretboard oils use mineral oil as their main ingredient. Mineral oil is inexpensive, will not go bad, and is readily available at most pharmacies. So if you want a cheap and virtually identical ...


5

It's best to just wipe down your fret board with a damp clean cotton cloth. This is what Martin Guitars recommends for cleaning the fret boards of their acoustic guitars and it does work.


3

I would not want to put coconut oil on any of my fretboards (or any other part of my guitar). Coconut oil is great stuff with many beneficial uses. Guitar maintenance is not one of them. One unique property of coconut oil is that it tends to begin to solidify at the temperatures that are most optimal for guitar storage. Lemon oil is a recommended ...


3

If the harmonica had a plastic comb, you could simply soak the whole thing in lemon juice overnight. Old harmonicas which have pins or rivets typically have pear-wood combs however, and soaking them is not advisable. Rivets and pins are essentially the same thing. Rivets are hollow-tube pins. A two-part hollow tube would definitely be called a rivet, but ...


3

If the goal is to remove the rosin residue on your strings, you can remove it with a soft dry cloth, without any other product. Put the cloth on the string, one at a time, then by snapping two fingers together firmly go back and forth across the length of the string. This sould produce a somewhat high shriek from the strings and will put them out of tune. ...


3

For a rotary-valve tuba, the process is slightly different because the rotary valves cannot be removed from their housings (unlike piston valves). However, the basic idea is the same: Draw a lukewarm bath of water into the tub. Add a mild hand soap to aid cleaning; DO NOT use dish detergent (you'll never get it back out of the rotaries no matter how much ...


3

This is for a piston-valve tuba, by the way, not a rotary valve. Also keep in mind to do this all very gently, tubas scratch easily. You'll want to take it completely apart (valves out too, and remember how it goes together) and set in a bath tub full of warm/hot water. Then, add some soap (mild, non-abrasive) and rub it gently with a cloth to get off grime ...


2

Overall, the residue will affect the sound if it's large enough to change the shape of a tube. If you have a lot of dirt or "stuff" inside it can affect the tube size or change the direction of the sound waves, and so change the tone and pitch. It is probably more important to keep the valves clean and oiled so they don't wear and leak around the edges (and ...


2

Some plastic recorders have separate blocks but most of those are glued in so removing them is not really possible. Warm/hot dishwater in the sink will do the trick. Later, a piece of card stock cut appropriately can be used to dislodge particles of food or lint that get caught in windway afterwards, or just wash it again. A clean pipe cleaner will work also,...


2

Yes. When cleaning the tuba (in the sense of a full cleaning of the instrument), you should also take out the springs in order to clean properly. This is for more easily cleaning both the springs and also the bottom interior of the housing.


2

If your tailpiece is loose my advice is: go to a luthier. Because in this case is important to check if the sound-pole is in its place, as it can move away or fall and endanger the violin. Since you have to do that ask there for a cleaning product. Violins have a special polish that is most often made/produced by the luthier himself. On your own I would ...


2

I trialled all three methods. Both the coke and vinegar solution took some of the tarnish off over about 8 hours, but neither did the entire job. (The coke was more effective, but perhaps using straight vinegar, rather than a solution may help.) The bicarbonate of soda was the most effective method. An hour or two of soaking took a lot of tarnish off, ...


2

Using vegetable oils such as coconut oil is generally not recommended (see below). Also, it seems unlikely that the fretboard is actually dry. Are you sure it is not simply very dirty? In any way, a good scrubbing with an old toothbrush or even very fine steel wool is recommended before oiling the surface, since the oil doesn't actually do a good job of ...


1

Lemon oil. I've used it for decades. Use it undiluted, and sparingly. I find it to be an excellent cleaner for unfinished fretboards. I generally use a different cleaner for the finished wood surfaces.


1

Most luthiers and repairmen will shy away from anything that's not lemon oil (Though other suggestions from luthiers include linseed and mineral oil). This is what people have been conditioning fretboards with for a long time and generally consider it safe when used sparingly and only on the wood. Oiling a fretboard is considered purely cosmetic, however ...


1

I would be concerned about coconut oil getting under the frets and loosening them, personally. It seems a heavier oil than most prescribed for fretboards, and I've never seen it sold commercially as a luthiery product. I'm also not sure how you would remove excess oil, as it doesn't evaporate off like lighter products such as lemon oil. In short, I would ...


1

Martin too makes a pump polish, and they make cedar-topped guitars, so I suspect that their product would work fine. What you haven't described is the cedar's present finish and condition. I have not compared the Martin and Gibson varieties; for all I know, they could be identical. For unfinished wood, I often use Lemon Oil -- such as cleaning a fretboard. ...


1

Short answer, no. To oil it, first unscrew the top valve cap and remove piston. Next wipe off the old oil. Apply the new oil to the piston. Replace piston to valve casing and re-screw top valve cap. Screw the finger-piece clockwise until it stops. This aligns the piston correctly in the casing. Press and depress key quickly to work oil around. You don'...


1

I would try a pipe-cleaner, or perhaps a cheap brass mouthpiece brush. Some mouthpiece brushes have a plastic cap on the wire though; those won't work. A pipe cleaner would probably be your best bet.


1

Can't you take the slide completely out and clean it? and use a pipe-cleaner style piece to clean inside the slides?


1

The mouthpiece is likely silver plated; silver polish will work well on that, as would the aluminum foil trick. (Since it's silver plated as opposed to solid silver, perhaps try that trick first.) I think the aluminum foil trick: http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/homeexpts/tarnish.html will likely be the least damaging, but I'm not an expert in metallurgy. The ...


1

A pipe cleaner works very well. If you fold it in half it won't scratch your flute.


1

I approach cleaning my recorders the same way a flutist cleans their instrument because both have a stopped head joint. My recorders all came with a cleaning rod. I use a small piece of fabric, usually silk, and run this through the instrument after each time I play. You should be careful when cleaning the windway because any nicks to the ramp (the angled ...



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