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14

Great question! I just happen to have the Prelude on my desk at the moment - you've got a really interesting project on your hands there, but quite a lot of work - good luck! Hopefully I can add to jjmusicnotes really useful advice with some ideas that will make this a far simpler project for you. Firstly, from your question, it seems like you are ...


8

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is one that you can only ultimately provide. Orchestration is an art form unto itself, and your choices are personal and unique to your sense of nuance and knowledge of the music. For example, a particular melody or line given to a cornet will sound differently if given to the flugelhorn instead; though the same ...


8

In a real orchestra? It varies. Maybe 10 first violins, 10 second violins, 10 violas, 8 cellos, 6 double basses. Maybe 14, 14, 12, 12, 10. Mozart and Haydn had smaller orchestras so you may see 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, although they sound OK with a larger or smaller group. Not as many bass instruments are needed to balance the treble instruments. For late ...


6

It's a baroque trumpet, basically a historical version of a trumpet without valves. Probably they hold it like that because that was the way it was held at that time (think of musicians on a tower, announcing the arrival of the king or stuff like that...)


6

Sounds like you are trying to intellectually and analytically "understand" music. In my opinion, this can be done to some extent. Just like you can intellectually understand language and grammar, and use that understanding to write poems, novels and short stories. However useful it might be, it isn't really necessary to write great stories. What makes a ...


5

Definitely don't throw in the towel. Everyone is different. Some amazing musicians have no grasp of theory at all, but over time they learn what sounds work and what sounds don't. For most of the music I play, theory is unnecessary - but it helps once you have some physical capability. So I could, for example, play basic rock chords in a 4/4 rhythm and it ...


4

I suppose with a cornet you'll have the ability to add something extra in for texture, so something like finding the main melody line in the song, whether it be with guitar or vocals have the trumpet follow this line to emphasise the line and it could offer a massive difference to the sound and feel of the song depending, you should try looking at reel big ...


3

In the Classical era, dividing into two voices was fairly common (especially in violas but also 1st or 2nd violins and sometimes 'cellos). That would potentially give you 4 violin voices. If you include double stopping, you have more voices. (Because of triple-stopping, it's not uncommon to need nine or more string parts when doing computer realizations of ...


3

Db Piccolo Db Piccolo's first came about when bands began to be dominated by early brass instruments, and repertoires were adjusted to suitable keys for brass instruments - which created awkward fingerings for the old, simple system, C piccolos. (The simple system limited the keys the instrument could easily play in.) By creating the Db piccolo, piccolo ...


3

"In band music, the Db piccolo, rather than the larger orchestral C piccolo, was the mainstay until the early 20th Century, when the Db parts were gradually transposed for the C piccolo because of its stronger tone." Source: http://kjt.glis.net/tealflutestudio/PiccoloEbTenor.html Wikipedia might help a little on the Eb horn, but I don't have ...


3

It seems that available instrumentists (more than instruments) were key as well as a figure of the composer as an individualistic and total master of the music he writes. The development of cellists' virtuosity (such as Joseph Franz Weigl, friend of Haydn, Josef Fiala, Josef Reicha (friend of Mozart) and later the Duport brothers and Romberg) has been ...


2

It's just a change in style, like the way blues and rock bands changed from having guitars only in the background to having guitars up front. The basso continuo was a standardized sort of accompaniment, typically given a bass line and chord symbols only and filing in the chords ad libitum. J.S. Bach was already beginning to exert more control, writing ...


2

Here is my feeble attempt at combining the individual instruments Register tone quality into one chart. Note: Samuel Adler's Orchestration book did not have any of this for the Strings but that is not what I was looking for so I am satisfied. Also, I had a hard time getting everything in the image, so some instruments are placed rather randomly...


2

Normally questions concerning material solicitation are shut down, but I think in this case, since it applies to orchestration, which is musical practice related to composition pedagogy, it is pertinent to this forum. First, there are two great texts concerning orchestration: Alfred Blatter's "Orchestration" and Samuel Adler's "The Study of Orchestration." ...


2

I think the answers so far spend too few consideration on the fact that we're talking here about a single trumpet added to a standard rock ensemble. Sure, there is lots of pop/rock music with brass and wind, but that is actually quite different from only having a single trumpet. Typically, a single wind or brass instrument would only be truly capable of ...


2

Why can some "just learn" music without learning theory well, etc.? Because learning theory is not necessary. Consider singing, or child prodigies, it's a fallacy that you can become an expert in anything before you even start practising it. I feel that anybody that starts anything with theory, is doing it the hard way. Start by trying. Studying theory ...


2

Your playing abilities are currently basic. Music theory is about as helpful to you as a thorough knowledge of some language's grammar is to somebody who knows about 100 words in that language. How can any kid talk better in that language without even a clue of the underlying grammar? The point is that a grammar is something that emerged along with the ...


2

You last question is a non-sequetur. The question of whether or not you do something has nothing to do with how easy it is for others to do. The question before you is whether you want to put in the time and effort to bring yourself to the level you want to be at. I have seen people with great natural talents squander them because they didn't care to ...


2

Even though almost every brass player living hates mutes (including me), use them extensively. They are invaluable for managing timbre changes. Just remember it takes a few beats to get the mute in and remove it.If you want an oboe-ish tone, a cornet in harmon (stem-in) or a metal straight gives a reasonable substitute. (Holst used this trick with a ...


2

Lots of people have natural aptitude to something - be it swimming, painting, playing football... Those lucky enough to have it in music will be able to just play.Maybe not brilliantly at the start, but progress is usually good, Getting to know the instrument is paramount.Theory not so. More later. With a complete beginner, I get them used to the ...


1

Assuming that the instruments are not synthesized, I can hear strings (both bowed and pizzicato) piano harp oboe bass guitar percussion


1

Nice to hear of someone arranging for Brass Band. As a young teenager (50 years ago), brass bands introduced me to classical music. These days I play recorder in an early music consort, but that's another story. My thoughts are: Violin 1, 2 and viola map roughly to solo, 2nd & 3rd cornet (and possibly tenor horn). This is necessary as they are the ...


1

Excellent question. It's because these people learn to play by ear, they learn how to use music as a language of its own, and usually this learning process is done by listening, imitating, noodling and experimenting. Doing that enough will get you to a high degree of proficiency without needing music theory. There's also probably an element of having a ...


1

Some people just have a good ear and had an opportunity to start playing at a very early age. They have an instinct to respond to music around them and it is like a language. Many blues players have no idea how theory works and are amazing. James Hetfield who wrote all that complicated music admitted he can't read or write music in an interview that I once ...


1

There are some good examples. Have a look at Less Than Jake's song, Gainesville Rock City: You need to arrange the songs so it works, but rock music can definitely cope with ...


1

There are several examples of bands with horns (including trumpets). Going back a few decades two of the most prominent would be "Blood Sweat and Tears" and "Chicago." There's also the 70's band "Tower of Power." How about the Beatles ("All you Need Is Love")? The one-hit-wonder band "Alive and Kicking" with "Tighter, Tighter." Good luck!



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