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It is possible that some guitars just never live long enough to become "vintage", because they never sounded good in the first place. And a bad sounding guitar is not going to improve much with age. In the case of a laminate top cheap mass produced guitar, no amount of aging is ever going to make it sound like a new solid wood guitar. Acoustic guitars ...


3

Short answer: No. Long Answer: Could it happen in this universe? The laws of physics do not prevent marimba bars from existing on a vibraphone frame. But I find it highly unlikely that you would find a set of bars that would fit. For one thing marimba bars are thicker vertically than vibraphone bars. The holes would need to line up with where the string ...


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The lowest notes will be the most sensitive to any air leaks in the instrument. Aside from possible damage to the joints between the three parts of the instrument, the most likely cause of leaks is not covering the finger holes fully. The lowest two holes are actually two small holes, so make sure you are covering both of them completely. The easiest way to ...


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If we separate out the effects you could see, The body/neck wood could absorb energy from the strings, causing the sound to decay faster (and with preference for certain frequencies) The body/neck wood could then retransmit energy back into the strings, again possibly with preference for certain frequencies due to resonances in the wood The body/neck ...


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Here's how you read the model numbers for the last ten years first digit -> year The first digit tells you from which year the instument is. 2.. means 2005: CLP-220, CLP-230, CLP-240, CLP-270, CLP-280 3.. means 2007: CLP-320, CLP-330,... second digit -> quality/features The second digit tells you how high its quality is compared to the other models of ...


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Start by drawing on hole 8 will give you the notes without bending. An octave higher than where you originally want, though. It can also be played on a G harp, starting on hole 6, with a blow. The trouble with the lower holes is there's no 6th note from the scale, so the 7th needs to be bent a whole tone. To make that A). This isn't easy to do exactly in ...


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The answer is "yes", because virtually every part of an electric guitar affects the quality of the sound to some degree. Electric guitarists agree that the selection of woods in the body, neck and fingerboard make significant differences in timbre (the distinguishing characteristics of the tone and sound). (When we talk about the characteristics of the ...


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The wood used in a electric guitar will add body to the pure vibrating string sound. My luthier once told me that the wood you use is like a landscape and the pickups are like windows through which you observe it. If the landscape has some beautiful sections, but your window can only let you see the ugly portions of it, you have a problem. The strings are ...


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In some circumstances the vintage instruments sound better due to changes in the manufacturer's specs. For instance, the Fender P-Bass is a very highly desired instrument from certain specific years (can't remember which years off hand). Fender changed their specs and many have argued not for the better. In this particular case, I think there are two ...


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The answer above pretty much covers everything, but another good thing to watch for is the pattern of the wood. The wood on the back of a cello is usually made of maple, which is generally considered the best type of wood for stringed instruments' backs, sides, or sometimes necks. The highest quality maple wood will have lots of "flames". These are ...



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