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30

It's easiest for the player to put downward pressure on the instrument string when the bow is making contact with the string near the end that the player holds (the 'frog' end). This means that on a downstroke (extending the arm), it's easier to start the bowing action with firmer pressure. Players tend to take advantage of this by using downstrokes to ...


22

Yes, it is obvious. A note played "up-bow" sounds discernably different than a note played "down-bow". A string player can also play a series of notes continuously using the same long bowing motion, or the player can "saw" back-and-forth, reversing direction between each note. There are several other kinds of bowing articulation techniques as well. They all ...


15

The obvious ones are -trumpet - no use for pinkie at all, and slide trombone - no use for fingers separately. Followed closely by xylophone/marimba/glock/vibraphone and drums.


11

I'm not entirely certain of whether this is providing information that the OP doesn't already have. Apologies if this is a repeat of known knowledge. In the early evolution of the horn as an orchestral instrument, it had no keys, so the player could only play notes in the harmonic series of the instruments, plus-or-minus hand-stopping (which changes the ...


10

Really? Not one mention of Django Reinhardt? Django lost the use of his fourth and fifth fingers in a fire but that didn't stop him from ripping it up on guitar (and inventing a new genre of music in the process). A few years ago, I sustained a minor sprain in my fretting hand which made it painful to make certain finger changes (I play bass mostly, but ...


9

"Rock" is a very unspecific description. But pretty much all minerals are alike in that they don't really shine in the department of elastic deformation and consequently are not useful for transmitting sound in a reliable and non-dispersive manner. So they suck at resonating. Marble is somewhat being used for high-end loudspeaker boxes exactly because of ...


8

Learning the guitar as a beginner has many inherent challenges from the very start. For one, you are asking the new guitar student to teach their brain how to tell their fingers to contort in very strange and unnatural ways that they have never before even remotely contemplated. And the finger strength needed for many chords has not been developed yet. ...


8

Are you a singer who is primarily looking to increase your vocal performance or are you actually interested in learning the instrument for the instrument itself? I would say these two things are different. Because if you are really only interested in singing, then there are plenty of vocal exercises you can do to increase all of the things you want and much ...


7

Harmonica, blues or chromatic.


7

The typical recorder fits the bill perfectly for you. It uses all fingers of the right hand, and the thumb and all-but-the-pinkie of the left hand.


6

In the second picture there is more tension in the Floyd because the springs are pulling on the trem more. It also depends a bit on your string gauge and tuning. Say for example you have light strings (42 - 9) but play in Drop C, the strings will create very little tension compared to a 46 gauge in standard tuning. In the case of the lighter strings, you ...


6

Pretty much all percussion instruments, which includes hammer dulcimer and its ilk. I don't know whether the harp requires pinky use or not. I suppose it'd be cheating to suggest the theremin :-) .


6

A twelve string guitar can add some extra jangle and shimmer to your guitar playing and give you a slightly fuller (but different) sound than a six string guitar. You play them both the same way - but on a twelve string there are 6 pairs of strings tuned either in octaves (different gauge strings) or in the case of the 1st and 2nd string pairs (e and b in ...


5

Not being a percussionist, when I want to add auxilliary percussion I get an idea in my mind of what sound I want, I go to the store and play the options in my price range until I find the closest thing to whats in my head, and I buy that. On recording aux percussion in general, you want to think about how it will fit with the rest of the sound. The more ...


5

No, there is no other term that I know of. The term "crossover" seems to be the term everybody uses, but sometimes they add "nylon-string" to make sure that people know they are not talking about guitars with steel strings. I have written extensively about crossover guitars on my blog, circa 2009. My first blog entry is here: ...


5

One possible explanation I finally found comes and cited from https://www.vsl.co.at/en/Horn_in_F/Notation: "In classical symphonic music, a pair of horns was generally used for pieces in a major key, whereas two pairs were used for pieces in a minor key. This was done for harmonic reasons, since it was the only way to produce the second subject in the ...


5

There are rather few synergies between the mechanisms of playing most instruments and singing, to the degree that it makes no sense to pick up a particular instrument except for the sake of playing the instrument on its own. Lung capacity does not really change all that much and it is rarely a limiting factor in singing: it's much more important to focus on ...


4

It is possible that some guitars just never live long enough to become "vintage", because they never sounded good in the first place. And a bad sounding guitar is not going to improve much with age. In the case of a laminate top cheap mass produced guitar, no amount of aging is ever going to make it sound like a new solid wood guitar. Acoustic guitars ...


4

Short answer: No. Long Answer: Could it happen in this universe? The laws of physics do not prevent marimba bars from existing on a vibraphone frame. But I find it highly unlikely that you would find a set of bars that would fit. For one thing marimba bars are thicker vertically than vibraphone bars. The holes would need to line up with where the string ...


4

To add to these great answers, I only have one suggestion - climbers chalk Moisture in the hands leads to blisters. Chalk alleviates moisture build up in the hands and helps to build callouses. Some notable guitar players who use chalk before every show: Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, John Mayer, etc. Chalk is a great when you haven't played in a while and don't ...


4

The lowest notes will be the most sensitive to any air leaks in the instrument. Aside from possible damage to the joints between the three parts of the instrument, the most likely cause of leaks is not covering the finger holes fully. The lowest two holes are actually two small holes, so make sure you are covering both of them completely. The easiest way to ...


4

Before getting into sound quality, one thing that can set pianos apart is their action. Last time I knew a lot about what was going on with pianos, only pianos with horizontal strings (grand style) could have a full proper double escapement action. That affects how quickly you can play the same note again after you've played it at least once, and/or how far ...


4

Some objective differences to listen for: Dynamic range. On an "entry level" instrument, if you play with enough force you get more mechanical noises, not louder notes. In a really poor instrument you might even break something. The quality of the action also limits how softly you can play without randomly not playing notes at all. In the 6-figure price ...


4

I got a percussion degree. Even I was never totally clear on what physical characteristics to look for in a triangle, but like @Todd said, you want to go with the sound. For MOST music, you want a nice, clear sound. You said you're doing pop music. You probably won't want something with too much sustain (cheaper may be better). You'll also want high pitch ...


4

Good question - it is a silly myth. If you really want to prevent tarnishing and buildup, brush your teeth before you play / keep your mouth clean. Clean your trumpet regularly (and I mean, a FULL bath clean!) Have it serviced by a certified tech regularly, and always stay on top of your maintenance with oil, slide grease, etc. Too much oil in the ...


4

MIDI is just a controller signal format. You can do pretty much anything with that – digital VST etc. instruments are nowadays most common, but there are also hardware synth units and even physical instruments you can control with MIDI, e.g. Disklavier. All these are in a sense MIDI instruments, though they aren't all digital. For keyboard instruments, ...


4

Traditionally one uses tympani. Another solution I have seen was to fire a blank round into a tympani with the head removed. I would guess that any large drum would be ok. I've also heard 105mm howitzers firing blank rounds; that's pretty effective.


3

Practice, practice, practice. Callouses do not form otherwise. Play until you can't bear it any more. Do this every day. Just get it over with. It will pay off in the end, I promise. In the meantime, there are ways of maximizing your practice time while your fingers develop into battle-hardened. Play lower strings more often. Note these are thicker ...


3

If we separate out the effects you could see, The body/neck wood could absorb energy from the strings, causing the sound to decay faster (and with preference for certain frequencies) The body/neck wood could then retransmit energy back into the strings, again possibly with preference for certain frequencies due to resonances in the wood The body/neck ...


3

To answer (1), I'd say the biggest single difference between a guitar and a bass is actually the separation (finger space in millimetres) between the strings. The instruments are intended for completely different jobs and picking styles, hence the difference. (Yes I know bassists can play chords but that is uncommon in mainstream pop/rock.) To answer (2), ...



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