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15

The obvious ones are -trumpet - no use for pinkie at all, and slide trombone - no use for fingers separately. Followed closely by xylophone/marimba/glock/vibraphone and drums.


12

The reason this clavichord's key arms are cranked (as they say) is because it is a fretted clavichord- that is, most of the strings play more than one note, depending on where they're struck. And as the strings get higher and shorter, the places they are struck that will produce a half tone of difference (say, between Eb and E) get closer together. In ...


11

I'm not entirely certain of whether this is providing information that the OP doesn't already have. Apologies if this is a repeat of known knowledge. In the early evolution of the horn as an orchestral instrument, it had no keys, so the player could only play notes in the harmonic series of the instruments, plus-or-minus hand-stopping (which changes the ...


10

Really? Not one mention of Django Reinhardt? Django lost the use of his fourth and fifth fingers in a fire but that didn't stop him from ripping it up on guitar (and inventing a new genre of music in the process). A few years ago, I sustained a minor sprain in my fretting hand which made it painful to make certain finger changes (I play bass mostly, but ...


10

Different-sized bottles (for blowing across), filled with different amounts of water, are one of the easier home-made instruments to tune accurately. Plastic does work if you're worried about breakages, but the rims of glass bottles tend to be a better shape for getting a note easily. You can also hit glass bottles (gently, with a light beater!) to get a ...


10

I'd honestly expect it to be flat rather than sharp! If the piano has a wooden frame holding the strings, it would be unwise to try to move the tuning much. When you tried it, and it was in tune, maybe it wasn't at concert pitch anyhow. If the frame is cast iron, it shouldn't have gone out by that much - unless it's not been tuned for years, and maybe has ...


9

"Rock" is a very unspecific description. But pretty much all minerals are alike in that they don't really shine in the department of elastic deformation and consequently are not useful for transmitting sound in a reliable and non-dispersive manner. So they suck at resonating. Marble is somewhat being used for high-end loudspeaker boxes exactly because of ...


9

It looks like one of pump organs, like: The instrument was invented in 1855, and da Motta was born 1868, so this was the high technology of its day, not some boring old pianoforte!


8

In the second picture there is more tension in the Floyd because the springs are pulling on the trem more. It also depends a bit on your string gauge and tuning. Say for example you have light strings (42 - 9) but play in Drop C, the strings will create very little tension compared to a 46 gauge in standard tuning. In the case of the lighter strings, you ...


8

Are you a singer who is primarily looking to increase your vocal performance or are you actually interested in learning the instrument for the instrument itself? I would say these two things are different. Because if you are really only interested in singing, then there are plenty of vocal exercises you can do to increase all of the things you want and much ...


7

Harmonica, blues or chromatic.


7

The typical recorder fits the bill perfectly for you. It uses all fingers of the right hand, and the thumb and all-but-the-pinkie of the left hand.


7

I'm certainly no authority on the subject, but it looks like some sort of foot operated harmonium or accordion. The attached image shows a similar instrument and calls it an "accordion worked with pedals", but it may be more recent than your example.


6

Pretty much all percussion instruments, which includes hammer dulcimer and its ilk. I don't know whether the harp requires pinky use or not. I suppose it'd be cheating to suggest the theremin :-) .


6

A twelve string guitar can add some extra jangle and shimmer to your guitar playing and give you a slightly fuller (but different) sound than a six string guitar. You play them both the same way - but on a twelve string there are 6 pairs of strings tuned either in octaves (different gauge strings) or in the case of the 1st and 2nd string pairs (e and b in ...


6

The OP's picture is a half-complete instrument. The tangents (the vertical metal pieces that press the strings) and the strings themselves are not yet in place, so it's hard for a "non-expert" to understand how the finished instrument will "work". The pictures in the Wikipedia link are of complete instruments, but the back of the keys is partly covered by ...


6

First one that comes to mind is a tea chest bass, as popular in the early '60s. Turn a tea chest, a broom handle and length of string into a playable 'double bass'. I tried to give an explanation of how it fits together and plays, but it's difficult. There are lots of youtube videos out there. Cans filled with, pebbles, grain, rice, etc. will give the kids ...


6

It's a damper, or mute, like this one here When you wish to mute the sound of the instrument you slide it near to the bridge in order to dampen the bridge vibrations.


5

One possible explanation I finally found comes and cited from https://www.vsl.co.at/en/Horn_in_F/Notation: "In classical symphonic music, a pair of horns was generally used for pieces in a major key, whereas two pairs were used for pieces in a minor key. This was done for harmonic reasons, since it was the only way to produce the second subject in the ...


5

There are rather few synergies between the mechanisms of playing most instruments and singing, to the degree that it makes no sense to pick up a particular instrument except for the sake of playing the instrument on its own. Lung capacity does not really change all that much and it is rarely a limiting factor in singing: it's much more important to focus on ...


4

MIDI is just a controller signal format. You can do pretty much anything with that – digital VST etc. instruments are nowadays most common, but there are also hardware synth units and even physical instruments you can control with MIDI, e.g. Disklavier. All these are in a sense MIDI instruments, though they aren't all digital. For keyboard instruments, ...


4

Traditionally one uses tympani. Another solution I have seen was to fire a blank round into a tympani with the head removed. I would guess that any large drum would be ok. I've also heard 105mm howitzers firing blank rounds; that's pretty effective.


4

This question has a long ,complex, and somewhat incomplete answer. All the items you mentioned matter. Trivial example, open and stopped organ pipes. An open pipe generates a fundamental wavelength equal the length of the pipe; there is a node at each end (that is, the air is still at each end.) A stopped pipe generates a fundamental with wavelength half ...


4

Clavichords work by shortening strings according to pitch. They keys all have the same distance, but the distances of shortening are spaced logarithmically like on a guitar fretboard. While this is somewhat masked by the overall distribution of notes across the strings (and the geometrical arrangement of the strings themselves), the higher pitches per ...


4

Google "straw oboe". It is a perfect and fun way to teach the children about how woodwind instruments work, by blowing compressed air through a tube which vibrates at just the right frequency. :) You can even tune them by changing the length of the straws .


4

The Washtub Bass (instructions here) is a personal favorite: So easy a kid can do it :-) The string vibrations are visible, so it makes for a nice teaching tool. You can also have folks experiment with putting some pillows inside the washtub or trying it on different surfaces etc. to notice the change in the sound and hypothesize about why.


4

Just found this picture, it's the same picture from the original question by nsn, but with a framing and caption from a magazine. The legend says "Vianna da Motta aged five, playing the harmonium flute". I believe it's precisely the same instrument model shown on the photo posted by alephzero, to the details of the turned shapes of the legs. The ...



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