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Pistons should be pretty close to silent. If you have a Yamaha or similar trumpet that has a tighter tolerance than other pistons, you can try using a thinner piston oil. If you have an older ("Classic") trumpet, the tolerance will be greater and you'll need to use a thicker oil. I, and my repair techs, recommend hetman oils for tight tolerance horns. I ...


2

It's not a defect. Imagine if you were to submerge a ring in soapy water and then pull it out you'd often get a sheet of bubble membrane across the ring. That's pretty much what's happening inside your trumpet valve. When you depress a valve, a bubble membrane made of valve oil can form across the airway that's opening, and when it pops (the oil film is even ...


1

The shape of the mouthpiece is generally more important than the material, though ebonite/rubber is vastly more common among the better mouthpieces, so I would expect that to be the material of almost any reasonable choice. The real thing you want to figure out is how open you want the facing: There are a variety of other characteristics that can affect ...


-1

This is more of an archaeology question than a music question, but it is generally agreed upon by the scientific community that the oldest known instruments are paleolithic-era bone flutes dating back to at least 42,000 years ago. As flutes are a type of reed instrument, this should answer your question! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paleolithic_flutes ...


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Well, people in the outdoors with leisure time. Now outdoor jobs in prehistoric times were not all that unusual, but leisure time may have been. Hunters might have started reed instruments from primitive bird calls. Shepherds are obvious candidates for perfecting those in leisure time, and are also associated with ancient flutes. Shawms are medieval ...


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I've heard that beginner players tend to use a plastic mouth piece, because its cheaper and easier to replace if broken. However a hard rubber mouth piece will allow you to develope a better sound although if dropped they will shatter, and they are more expensive. So if you are prepared to pay a lot and arent to clumsy go with rubber, otherwise start off ...


3

To answer (1), I'd say the biggest single difference between a guitar and a bass is actually the separation (finger space in millimetres) between the strings. The instruments are intended for completely different jobs and picking styles, hence the difference. (Yes I know bassists can play chords but that is uncommon in mainstream pop/rock.) To answer (2), ...


2

There are marked differences between basses and guitars, the main one being the string length. On a bass, this allows a longer string to be at a playable tension, whilst being thick enough to play lower notes. The high C found on some 5 string basses will sound somewhat like the bottom or 5th string on a standard guitar. Conversely, the bottom (usually B) ...


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For (1), look at the headstock and the tuning keys. Basses have bigger, thicker strings and need large tuning keys. Strings in the guitar range are considerably lighter and smaller and don't require the really big tuning machines. For (2), not sure.



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