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0

I truly prefer the 1st version. Since all my guitars have trems (I got only one with a FR), the first spring setup suited my guitars best ; the second one always put my guitar out of tune whenever I used the tremolo. The 6th string had too much tension, resulting in a sharp (de)tuning when I got the tremolo back into position.


2

This is a good example of why we shouldn't get hung up on definitions. The word is not the thing, and there's no "correct" definition of what constitutes an instrument and what doesn't, because the world doesn't split up nicely into instruments and non-instruments.


0

Here are some note patterns to help introduce an F attachment as more than just a hollow counterweight.            These patterns are good to repeat at all speeds and in a variety of styles, and can even be helpful once you are comfortable, which won't take long. These do not take the place structured instruction but may help ...


0

In enthusiastic agreement with Hilmar's explanation of excitation and resonance for an open-valved trumpet, here are additional details and a chart about relationships between resonant frequencies, timbral components and pitch. This follows the question's example of an open-valved middle G played on a trumpet. Corresponding notes for other brasses are listed ...


0

You sound frightened of learning something a little bit new! How strange. I'm sure you've already reached the stage of using "alternative" positions to facilitate agility and legato playing. Well, you're just about to gain a few more alternatives. You'll still use 6th and 7th positions where appropriate. In fact, a F attachment isn't THAT big a deal for ...


1

I've never seen a piano a tone sharp. You probably mean D sounds like C. It is not unusual to find an old piano that is tuned under pitch. Often it is done to avoid breaking strings. Sometimes it is the result of the owner not wanting to pay the extra money to tune the piano at concert pitch. Some really old pianos were designed to be tuned at 435hz. ...


1

You'll get used to 6/7 the same way you got used to 1-7 - practice! Actually, many trombone teachers find that students use the F attachment too much, not too little. There are many times where it will make much more sense to use the 6th and 7th positions instead of 1 and 2 for both E, F, B, and C. Further, there are many uses outside of T1 and T2. For ...


0

This would be extremely rare for a new-ish piano just from moving (unless maybe if it got pulled out of the lake and left in the rain and/or dropped down the stairs during the move). Yes, it can probably be fixed and is probably worth fixing. You would need to have a pro look at it and do an assessment.


1

Not only can it be fixed there is actually a whole profession built around fixing it. Piano tuner is a musical profession rich is stature and history. It is a profession that is often promoted among people with visual impairments as their heightened sense of hearing makes them well suited to a profession where you have to listen attentively to the pitches ...


10

I'd honestly expect it to be flat rather than sharp! If the piano has a wooden frame holding the strings, it would be unwise to try to move the tuning much. When you tried it, and it was in tune, maybe it wasn't at concert pitch anyhow. If the frame is cast iron, it shouldn't have gone out by that much - unless it's not been tuned for years, and maybe has ...


6

It's a damper, or mute, like this one here When you wish to mute the sound of the instrument you slide it near to the bridge in order to dampen the bridge vibrations.


4

Just found this picture, it's the same picture from the original question by nsn, but with a framing and caption from a magazine. The legend says "Vianna da Motta aged five, playing the harmonium flute". I believe it's precisely the same instrument model shown on the photo posted by alephzero, to the details of the turned shapes of the legs. The ...


0

To add to alephzero's notes on the clarinet, I'm pretty sure Adolphe Sax designed his set of instruments so a musician could easily switch from clarinet to sax and back. As it happens, there is a "C-melody sax" in rare use as well. Now to the question of key signature: The resonances and timbres of keyed instruments depend on the bore and the bottom note ...


1

The clarinet is different from almost every other wind instrument because it overblows at the twelfth, not at the octave. Therefore, the notes to cover the "break" between the lowest octave and a fifth are technically more difficult, especially on early clarinets with a limited number of finger-keys. The orchestral use of B flat and A clarinets dates from ...


2

And... And string "action" - higher action is louder. And the angle at which the string attaches to the body (as in Millenial style guitars) - a greater angle is louder. And the place at which you pluck the strings - this varies (by guitar and by individual string) but the string is usually louder near the double-octave harmonic next to the sound hole. And ...


1

From the description it sounds as if it is a fluid cup on the bottom of the valves. It would be there to prevent oil and saliva that would normally come out the bottom of the valves from dropping onto the floor. Purpose is for sanitary reasons.



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