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3

This is almost entirely down to tradition - early guitars used similar construction to equivalent instruments - lutes, violins etc all had that slot mechanism for the tuning pegs, where you have a slightly tapered tuning peg that is pushed into the hole to tighten. Obviously, with more recent technology, tuning pegs with worm gear mechanism have removed the ...


3

Which leads me to wonder - just how much difference is there between a decent contemporary digital piano (something on the order of $1000 or more) and an acoustic piano? If put to the test, would the experts be able to tell the difference? Or perhaps it's time we revised this "old truth"? Does anybody have any hard evidence on this? Any double-blind AB ...


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Digital and acoustic piano's are 2 different beasts and it completely depends on what you are using them for wether the analog or the digital is the best. It is not the same as comparing an electric and acoustic guitar. Both are guitars with strings the only difference is how the sound of the strings is amplified. A digital piano on the other hand contains ...


3

I own, and have performed on both kinds. I use them for different reasons, in different scenarios. If you can have only one, you should choose according to your needs. What kind of music will you mostly play? Does your digital need to be portable? ACOUSTIC: A good many classical composers have written piano music that deliberately creates an interesting ...


4

I'm only a guitarist, but I play once a week on a real piano at my teacher's studio, and I have a Yamaha P-115 digital piano at home (weighted keys, $600 retail most places -- I got lucky and paid $400 at a salvage store). The feel is a bit different between the two, but it's in the ballpark (for a tyro like me). No trouble adjusting. I originally started ...


3

The whole point of a digital piano is attempt to re-create an acoustic one. Maybe better isn't the right way to think. There is an instrument called the piano. It's big and feels and sounds a certain way. There are many digital imitations of the real things called pianos. The primary reasons why digital pianos exist in the first place are cost and size. ...


0

Yes, the issue of sound is important, and I've heard some really convincing digital pianos over the last few years. But for me, it's another issue entirely: the touch of a digital keyboard compared to a piano. (As such, it may seem like I'm not answering your final two questions, but I am trying to answer the general inquiry from a different perspective.) ...


3

A few thoughts... A theremin cello has a ribbon that controls the pitch, a guitar has frets. In effect this is similar to having a fretless and fretted neck in one. Is it doable? Perhaps. Is it practical? Probably not. The electronics are no problem, in fact all you need is a "blend" control. Another thing to consider is the pitch range of the theremin. ...


1

There are several questions here. Is there a neck design like this? Don't know - never seen one. (I can think of several alternative ways of doing the same thing though.) Will it work? Probably, provided the contact ribbon can be mounted where it doesn't interfere with the strings or frets. On the back of the neck, or build a wider fingerboard and mount ...


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That's for sure a highly unusual idea, and probably original. Maybe someone knows something similar, but I don't think anyone can tell you for sure that it doesn't exist elsewhere and only the patents office itself can tell you if it's not already patented. Btw, it's outside the scope of this stack, but, from little I know about patents, you have to patent ...


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To add to Neil's comment, given that when the clarinet player plays a C, it sounds like a B-flat, then to compensate, you must tell the clarinet player to play a D so that it sounds like a C - and thus matches the C played by the rest of the orchestra. If you're writing a piece and are looking to arrange it for band or orchestra, I highly recommend tracking ...


4

This is more of a comment really but I don't have the rep to post it as such. Whilst I mostly agree with what Tim has said it occurs to me that there is no reason for this to be always true. There are piano pieces where the left hand part and right hand part have different key signatures (e.g. Prokofiev's Sarcasms 3rd mvt), so I would not be surprised if ...



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