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2

Wide mouthpiece - easier, more volume. Small mouthpiece - higher notes easier to control, more compressed tone.


0

It really depends on how much time you have to prepare. You can probably adjust to the organ well enough to play a simplified version of the march at the wedding in 6 months, assuming you find a qualified private teacher and diligently follow his instructions. It will require a lot practice for you but is doable if you have the time.


0

The pipe organ itself is not related to the piano in any way other than the scales of notes, and is about as similar to a piano as a xylophone is (actually it is more similar to a harpsichord). To be a good organist, you have to scrap much of what you have learned about piano technique, because very little of it will help you when you get onto the organ ...


1

There are slight differences between keyboard technique on organ and piano, but if you're a good pianist and have a decent ear, you'll probably make a lot of the adjustments automatically. As an experienced pianist, I did not find it difficult to learn to play organ manuals. Note that organ notes sustain as long as you hold the key, but there's no sustain ...


11

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


4

Organ playing requires more legato, learn to slide around the keyboard. Sometimes it helps to change fingers while the note is still held down so that you can move more smoothly to the next note. It's a good exercise for a pianist wanting to get a cleaner legato line.


12

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


0

A Ryoji Matsuoka of course, for intermediate to advanced users. They're known to be finest handcrafted classical guitar in Japan (also Yamaha, Kodaira, Aranjuez, Asturias, Shunpei Nishino and more). Matsuoka himself produce some guitars in 70-80s in a small workshop (which he doesn't build the guitar alone). For the tone, and sounds, you can check my ...


3

It sounds like you're probably going to play the Mendelssohn Wedding March. If so, this should be okay for you to play on the organ. Just looking on Google, there are loads of arrangements of this piece, both for piano and organ. Of course, a piano version will suit you much better, as you won't need to play the third stave, which is the pedal part played ...


0

I'm teaching myself to play piano, and I'm purposely using one with really "tight", difficult to press keys for practice. I don't think you are doing yourself much of a favor with that. Piano playing is more than striking the right keys at the right time: the piano is a much more expressive instrument than, say, a harpsichord. A good player can work with ...



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