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11

As is the case with many classical pieces of absolute music, the subtitle of this piano sonata was not attributed by the composer. (See also the Chopin preludes and etudes -- he saw his music expressly as non-programmatic, but many of these pieces have gained "nicknames" such as "Revolutionary", "Winter Wind" from performers and listeners over the years.) ...


7

Even if I would not take the late Karajan as a reference for this, you are right, the first time of each bars of a Wiener Waltzer is almost always played short, usually the leading voice is even slighter in advance than the bass when the melody is written on 3 quarter notes. This can be approximated as removing 1/6th of the first time and adding it in ...


7

This is very much a matter of taste. You emphasize different things and get different interpretations. Others may love it, others may hate it. The most important thing is that it "works", but it can work in so many different ways. Just as an example, there's a temporary change of key in the section with the repeated bass notes. Say you want to emphasize the ...


7

The written notes actually miss a lot of information. If you would write down every little tempo change, every little accent, small and large scale rubato, microdynamics, articulations, etc. etc., the score would be impossible to read, and it would probably still miss something. What the composer writes down is just a skeleton of the piece and the most ...


5

Since I have been studying and living in Austria as a South African music student I have had several opportunities to play waltzes in orchestras. Especially New Years concerts consist of a couple of famous Viennese Waltzes and since the first time I had to play one of these, I have also been fascinated by this interesting rhythmical appearance. Being both ...


4

The other one in the same opus is also a "Sonata quasi una Fantasia" and is more obviously one. It doesn't break down cleanly into movements but appears to start a movement, suddenly go into another one, and then come back to the first one again. A "Fantasia", for instance one of Mozart's, has a kind of "anything goes" improvisatory feel, where a ...


4

About Chopin's fourth Ballade: Most of the piece is on a quaver unit and fast (con moto) but ritenuto are frequent. Listening to several great pianists (such as Christian Zimmerman, Piotr Anderszewski, Luganski ...) they play the piece at approximately 130 semiquavers by minute. This series of chords at bar 203 is preceded by a vigorous series of chords ...


3

This will always be subjective, but I'd say subtle tempo changes are probably best (and yes, I'm aware that's a subjectively interpreted answer in itself!) You want to demonstrate an awareness of the tempo changes, you want to give the listener the sense of that tempo change, but without taking it to extremes. Practice until you have control over the tempo ...


3

One useful way of looking at it is that the orchestra is a single musical instrument, and the conductor is the player, playing the orchestra. While the notes and durations are written on the sheets, the conductor indicates to the musicians the exact timing and articulations of important melodies. Sections that have long rests may receive a cue when they ...


2

Any piece can actually be performed in an incredibly wide variety of ways, and the controller of style, flow, feeling, pace etc is the conductor. Generally the conductor is considered the most important person in an orchestra once the skill level of the individual musicians is high enough.


1

Conscious voice training and feedback will help you immensely. Try video recording yourself trying to sing with different accents. Really accentuate the movement of your lips,tongue and cheeks so you can see the effect. Memorise these different movements- visually at first, then the feeling. Now try the song again, and when you feel yourself skipping ...


1

Speaking as a recovering percussionist and as a conductor, it is important to note that the methods used to talk descriptively about beat placement have two contradictory qualities: They come from a very modern and commercial worldview. I use the term commercial to refer specifically to the advent of electronic recording techniques and more specifically to ...


1

In the Viennese Waltz, the second beat is slightly anticipated. This is a particular characteristic of the Viennese Waltz. When conducting such waltzes, conductors generally only indicate each bar rather than each beat. The timing is roughly as if the beats are triplets with the second beat syncopated.



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