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23

In classical theory, the necessity or lack thereof of a particular chord member is generally determined by the note's tendency to lead to another note. That tendency comes most often from the interval of an augmented fourth or diminished fifth. Enharmonically, those intervals are the same, but in context, they are not, and they resolve differently. In a ...


20

D-D is unison (or "prime") Db-D or D-D# is augmented prime and Db-D# is a double augmented unison or prime. P.S. This is really something different than the enharmonic variants Db-Eb, but that was not the question.


17

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


15

The technical term for the scale seems to be the Minor "Gypsy" Scale and it is also known as the Flamenco Mode. The basic idea is it is a combination of two Phrygian Dominant tetrachords, or a Phrygian Dominant with a Major 7th scale degree. Here are the links that show both scales match the pattern above and includes the root scale of it the Phrygian ...


14

Sure is! These are called Intervals. It has to do with the number of "Scale Degrees" that separate two notes - basically, the number of notes you have to move through the scale from the first note to reach the second note (including the note you started on). These are worded "Second", "Third", "Fourth", "Fifth", "Sixth", "Seventh", "Octave" (Octave ...


14

A chord does not have to be made up of thirds. A chord is by definition two or more notes heard as if sounded simultaneously. Not all chords have three notes either. There are dyads (two notes), triads (three), tetrachords (four), pentachords (five), and hexachords (six). There's no limit on the number of notes, and also, by definition, there's no limits on ...


14

No, they are not considered consonant in all music cultures. The perception of consonance and dissonance can be different among cultures. The same interval can be perceived (and labeled) differently by different cultures. This is influenced by many factors (and the harmonic series is not the only one!) For example, in medieval times major thirds were ...


13

In classical Western music theory, each diatonic scale contains seven notes, and each of the notes must be assigned a different note name. (So one also does not write CX for the D in the C major scale.) In non-equal temperament, C# and Db may in fact be two different pitches, and a diatonic scale that contains a C must not also contain a C#. In more ...


13

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


12

Well, first of all, a unison is an interval ; as such, it makes sense to want to designate is, as you would do with any concept. Especially as it is used in real life. You sometime play with other people. In an orchestra, for example, chords are usually played across several parts. Several parts could very well be playing the same note in a chord, and you ...


12

Well, without any further context there is no possible distinction between a minor third and an augmented second as they are indeed the same note, technically. However, the phrases minor third and augmented second make reference not only to that space of three semitones, but also to the relationship that this interval plays within a given chord or scale. ...


11

Well, a musical chord is by definition a collection of two or more notes sounding simultaneously. So, mathematically, in the usually used 12-tone pitch system of Western/pop/jazz music, there are 2^11 - 1 = 2047 different possible combinations of pitch classes modulo transposition (2^11 is the number of ways additional tones can be added once you fix a root ...


11

There is exactly one note that is a diminished 3rd above Db: Fb. Db to Eb is not a diminished third, it is a major second. Those comments are wrong. This question explains the difference between two enharmonically equivalent notes.


11

Yes. A dissonance is an unstable sound - two or more tones sounding together that demand a resolution towards a consonance, which is a stable sound. "Resolving" a dissonant interval means that it is followed up by a consonant interval. Consonances are divided into perfect and imperfect ones. Perfect consonant intervals are most stable; they are the ...


11

There are four types of perfect interval: perfect unison, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, and perfect octave. These can be thought of as belonging to two groups. In the first group, all intervals of a unison or an octave are called perfect because the note is not changed. An octave is twice (or half) the frequency of the first note. The second group ...


11

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


10

Sure, chords can contain major and minor thirds at the same time! We see 'em all the time in jazz. I call it a major-minor chord (which however is quite different from a major-minor seventh chord). It's also called a mixed-third chord. In jazz chords you will also sometimes see it notated as a ♯9 instead of as a ♭3, though that implies a slightly different ...


10

A major triad does not contain "a minor third followed by a major third" and a minor triad does not contain "a major third followed by a major third". A major triad contains the root, major third, fifth. A minor triad contains the root, minor third, fifth. Or, counting in semitones: Major triad: root, root + 4, root + 7 Minor triad: root, root + 3, ...


10

My answer builds on the answer contributed by DR6. Based on your reaction to other very good answers posted here already, your question seems to boil down to: "Why do humans innately feel that certain intervals are consonant". And so much so that they are willing to call them "perfect". Before getting to that question, let's look at why Western culture ...


9

What I am going to write below is just simple jazz harmony fundamentals, and should naturally be considered as school stuff ! You have to understand the role of each voice in a chord, to define what should be played, and what can be omitted. Mandatory voices The root note defines the root of the chord, and must be played globally. I mean, if you have a ...


8

Take a major scale. There are seven different notes in it, so starting from the root note of the scale, number each note (In C major, you'd have C=1, D=2, etc). If you build a chord off of any of those notes, you can give it the number of whichever root note you chose (In C major again, Cmaj would be 1, Dm would be 2, etc). When Roman numerals are used, they ...


8

Other, better music theory people than me should give their opinion on this, but here's my thought: In certain cases, the proper name of a chord can depend on its function in the chord progression where you find it. In other words, a certain group of notes in a certain voicing in one key and chord progression would properly be named differently if found in ...


8

My music teacher taught us to memorise and recognise intervals using the "compare-it-to-a-familiar-song" method too. It works really well and Somewhere Over The Rainbow was the exact song we used as well. However, it's only effective if you're actually familiar with the tune - Also Sprach Zarathustra doesn't ring any bells with me. So, as my teacher did, ...


8

Eventually, if you keep practicing, all intervals will be obvious to you without having to relate to a song. At least by then it will not matter. I was taught (for some really tricky non-tonal sight singing ear training exercises) to use all tricks I could think of to find the next note. Suggested tricks included such as humming scale steps up or down to ...


8

A key thing to keep in mind is that technically a minor 3rd and an augmented 2nd are different pitches (have different notional fundamental frequencies), at least in anything other than equal temperament. In just intonation, these two pitches differ by approximately 40 cents (list of intervals), enough to make a perceptable difference in the degree of ...


7

I can think of at least one example where I encountered a C and C# conjoined. In Béla Bartók's Nine Little Piano Pieces, you'll find them in the Menuetto from measure 10 on. It would be natural to find more of these in Bartók, especially the pieces using polytonality. Other composers using polytonality like Stravinsky should also have them. So, look for ...


7

The augmented 4th / diminished 5th (aka tritone) is the furthest (enharmonic) note away both in terms of circle of fifths and shared harmonics so it is a very "distant" note.


7

It will absolutely be noticeable, because the arranger wanted to have a clear, deep bass line. Moving the line up one octave removes that effect. Now, if you did play your variant, nobody would stand up in the back of the room and shout "YOU'RE PLAYING IT WRONG". But having the deep bass line is fairly important in this music. You should, if at all ...


7

Fux does allow them in counterpoint. As I pointed out in one of my comments, confusion comes from voice-relationships: A minor-sixth is of course allowable between two voices because it is an imperfect consonant interval. A minor-sixth is not allowable within the same voice because it is a leap greater than a perfect-fifth and is therefore inexcusable ...


7

Maqam Suzidil (not a very Western name, but if you try to understand Turkish music, this might get you somewhere) says this and some other sites. Looks like they (Arabic, Persian, Turkish) have an interesting way of classifying the scales by decomposing them into (usually) tetrachords which all have their own "personality". I didn't explore this much but ...



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