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To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


4

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


2

Finger substitution is not the way to go, unless you are playing an organ and not the piano. Absolute legato on the piano isn't as important as playing the notes with even tempo and dynamics. If you have small hands you can play the whole passage fingered 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 etc. Learn to "jump" unobtrusively between 5 and 4. You can cover the ...


2

That is bach's cello prelude from suite no1? I used to play that on the piano, and I always stretched. As you get more advanced, you will be playing pieces that require this kind of stretching, and you will learn how to quickly adjust your hand in order to allow your fingers to go where they need to go. I am not sure what finger substitution is in this ...



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