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12

If I understand your question correctly, here's the problem: I also have heard that an inversion is simply in the opposite direction of the original interval. So a descending 3rd from F to D is the inversion of ascending third F to A. This should read "a descending third from F to D is the inversion of an ascending SIXTH from F to D." Thus I think the ...


5

The confusion here is natural, because the "inversion" of an interval, in classical harmony, does not mean the same interval in the other direction from a given note, but rather means to move the upper note down an octave, or the lower note up an octave. Thus, the "inversion" of the interval C up to E, which is a major third, is not C down to A flat, also a ...


4

Actually the inversion of a third will always be a sixth - not a third as posited in the title of your question. 3 + 6 = 9. The inversion of a fifth will be a fourth 5 + 4 = 9. The inversion of a fourth will be a fifth 4 + 5 = 9 and so on. An inversion of an interval (by definition) is simply flipping (inverting) the two notes comprising the interval ...


2

I think you are mixing up several different concepts, all called "inversion". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inversion_(music) gives a short explanation of the difference between inverted intervals inverted melodies inverted voices (in counterpoint) inverted chords (in common practice harmony) Some of these concepts might be better described as "...


2

You are making it slightly more difficult. Don't forget that inverted intervals change name, too. Thus, C to E is a major 3rd, whilst E to C is a minor 6th. Yes, the 'rule of nine' applies, but the interval becomes the opposite. Take C to Eb, it's a minor 3rd; invert it, Eb to C, and it's major 6th. C to G# is aug.5th, while G# to C is dim.4th. We generally ...


1

This sounds a little like a homework question, so I'll abstract it slightly in the hopes of leading you in the right direction without fulling giving you the answer. (I'll also use a much lesser-known musical example.) By "inverting" an interval, we mean it just moves in the other direction. Think of the famous opening to Beethoven 5: dun-dun-dun-DUNNNN, ...



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