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The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


10

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


2

Dissonances as such aren't much of an issue – resolving a dissonant chord into a consonance to give that consonance a "finality" is one of the most important things in classical harmony. That's not the trouble. Your chord has two other problems though: What's dissonant? Well, as you've written it and intend the "diminished first" to work, the root would ...


2

Typically in counterpoint movement is broken down into three different types including steps, skips, and leaps. I'm guessing in the case of Harmony in Context a small leap is the same as a skip. The intervals for each of these moments are as follows: Step: 2nd Skip: 3rd or 4th Leap: 5th or greater Wikipedia has a lot on the rules and process of ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


1

You are correct that Ab minor must contain a Cb, not any form of B (even though Cb and B are "enharmonically equivalent", Cb is the correct spelling here). However, there are contexts in which two different versions (e.g. sharp and natural) of the same base note can sound together. When this occurs, it is called a "chromatic contradiction," or a False ...



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