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12

Well, without any further context there is no possible distinction between a minor third and an augmented second as they are indeed the same note, technically. However, the phrases minor third and augmented second make reference not only to that space of three semitones, but also to the relationship that this interval plays within a given chord or scale. ...


10

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


8

A key thing to keep in mind is that technically a minor 3rd and an augmented 2nd are different pitches (have different notional fundamental frequencies), at least in anything other than equal temperament. In just intonation, these two pitches differ by approximately 40 cents (list of intervals), enough to make a perceptable difference in the degree of ...


3

Interval complexity is a direct function of the distance between the lowest note of the interval as compared to the highest note of the interval with the closest note in the harmonic series of the lowest note of the interval. (Phew!) Let me explain: Poor Man's Harmonic Series: For the sake of this explanation, let's pretend the harmonic series represents ...


3

The standard notation I've seen is just to keep writing degree signs before the numerical interval for multiply diminished and plus signs for augmented. Your abbreviated version doesn't conflict with anything I've seen, bit I wouldn't immediately recognize it either. Just +++++5 for quintuply-augmented fifth. I think the use of d and A can be a little ...


2

Yep, correct. I think it's easiest to picture the perfect quality of 4ths, 5ths, 8ves, etc. as being taken over by two possibilities (M and m) in the other intervals. In other words, once you've compressed or expanded beyond the central quality(ies) ({P} or {m,M}) then the diminished and augmented stuff functions in the same way.


2

One reason is that if you're specifying an augmented 2, its probably because you have an augmented second and a major third in the chord. These notes are only a half step apart, and that is very dissonant. Since we don't have, for example, a "minor fourth" interval, the third will always be major if an augmented 2 is involved. I guess there could be ...


1

It seems to stem not from the meaning that we attach to the words now, but the past. Consonant meant it sat well in the key, dissonant, the opposite. So, when WRITTEN in music, a minor 3rd belongs in a given set of notes, whereas a #2 is not found.It appears to be more of a technicality than a reflection of what it actually sounds like. Turn a minor 3 ...



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