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12

In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


11

The lowest notes on these examples must be written on the right of the chord. Not on the left or vertically centered as shown above.


6

An interval is just the distance between two notes. The name perfect 5th comes from the idea of a scale. For example the C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The 5th note of the scale is G hence the 5th of the C major scale is G. The interval is perfect because if we flip the interval we would get a 4th which exist in the G major ...


5

Technically yes, but you would almost never see B♯♯ as B♯♯ is an enharmonic equivalent to C♯ which makes much more senses in most cases. Likewise I've never seen more than 3 accidentals applied to a note so a quadrupled sharped F you would never see. Going back to C♯, the equivalent interval would be G♯♯ or Gx better known as A. So yes B♯♯ to F♯♯♯♯ is an ...


4

The problem with the definitions you dug up is that they refer to different things. The usual meaning of "perfect fifth" is in contrast to a "tempered fifth". In relation to a guitar, a perfect fifth is the interval you get between the first harmonic (over fret 12) and the second harmonic (over fret 7). When tuning, the most pleasing interval between most ...


3

The term "Perfect Fifth" is used to define an interval between two notes in a diatonic scale in Western Music. It's confusing because "fifth" sounds like a fraction (as in one fifth of 100 = 20). But while there is a ratio involved (the frequency ratio of the sound waves between the bass and high note) the term fifth as used in "Perfect Fifth" does not ...


3

Are you talking about the piano here? Because on the piano, even single notes are more dissonant in the bass clef than in the treble clef (look up "disharmonicity") because of the thickness of strings. Also for low frequency you can hear more overtones, and consequently their possible clashes. And also for lower frequencies more beatings are in the ...


3

A Semitone is the next physical adjacent note on a piano after a given pitch. Semitones are also often called "half-steps". If you pick a note on the piano, and count seven half-steps higher or lower, it will result in a perfect-fifth. For Example: A given fundamental note is "C". "C" to "C#" is one semitone. C->C#, C#->D, D->D#, D#->E, E->F, F->F#, ...


2

Whilst technically there may be a key called B##, there would never be any reason for it. There's not even a good reason for the key of B#, which from a writing and reading perspective has no credibility over the enharmonic C. Here, we're talking of intervals rather than keys, but B## will almost never exist, so an augmented 5th on it would be rare too. ...


2

Yes, as Dom said, it would be F#### indeed, despite how cumbersome that seems. The reason why is because if instead you wrote G## or A, it would no longer be a fifth (of any type). It would instead become either a 6th or 7th, because of the choice of note letter.



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