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18

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


14

No, they are not considered consonant in all music cultures. The perception of consonance and dissonance can be different among cultures. The same interval can be perceived (and labeled) differently by different cultures. This is influenced by many factors (and the harmonic series is not the only one!) For example, in medieval times major thirds were ...


13

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


13

In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


12

Well, without any further context there is no possible distinction between a minor third and an augmented second as they are indeed the same note, technically. However, the phrases minor third and augmented second make reference not only to that space of three semitones, but also to the relationship that this interval plays within a given chord or scale. ...


11

Yes. A dissonance is an unstable sound - two or more tones sounding together that demand a resolution towards a consonance, which is a stable sound. "Resolving" a dissonant interval means that it is followed up by a consonant interval. Consonances are divided into perfect and imperfect ones. Perfect consonant intervals are most stable; they are the ...


11

There are four types of perfect interval: perfect unison, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, and perfect octave. These can be thought of as belonging to two groups. In the first group, all intervals of a unison or an octave are called perfect because the note is not changed. An octave is twice (or half) the frequency of the first note. The second group ...


11

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


11

The lowest notes on these examples must be written on the right of the chord. Not on the left or vertically centered as shown above.


10

My answer builds on the answer contributed by DR6. Based on your reaction to other very good answers posted here already, your question seems to boil down to: "Why do humans innately feel that certain intervals are consonant". And so much so that they are willing to call them "perfect". Before getting to that question, let's look at why Western culture ...


8

A key thing to keep in mind is that technically a minor 3rd and an augmented 2nd are different pitches (have different notional fundamental frequencies), at least in anything other than equal temperament. In just intonation, these two pitches differ by approximately 40 cents (list of intervals), enough to make a perceptable difference in the degree of ...


7

Technically speaking, the answer is infinity for all intervals. This is because for any resonant harmonic of a fundamental, a harmonic exists at twice the frequency. There is an order in which these intervals appear, and that is easily found by looking at the harmonic series. You do need to know, of course, that the 12-tone equal temperament that we use ...


7

"Is there a solid definition of perfect intervals, lying around somewhere I just can't find?" Yes. A "perfect" interval is an interval that is not one of minor, major, diminished, augmented.


7

Since both of them are flat, it is the same interval they would be without flats. So: Bb - Eb would be the same as B - E which is perfect fourth. Bb - Ab would be the same as B - A which is minor 7th. Bb -Db would be the same as B - D which is minor 3rd.


7

Parallel movement in intervals is when two voices (notes) move the same distance( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ect ) in the same direction. This can be applied to any interval including 7ths. Here is an example of parallel 7ths: As you can see, C to B is a 7th and then both move up a 2nd to D and C respectively which is another 7th creating parallel 7ths because of how ...


7

An interval is just the distance between two notes. The name perfect 5th comes from the idea of a scale. For example the C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The 5th note of the scale is G hence the 5th of the C major scale is G. The interval is perfect because if we flip the interval we would get a 4th which exist in the G major ...


6

Perfect intervals are the ones that don't have two forms: major and minor. C Db D Eb E F F# G Ab A Bb B C root minor major minor major perfect tritone perfect minor major minor major octave 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd 4th aug/dim 5th 6th 6th 7th 7th ...


6

I use a simpler method; counting semitones. A major third has 4 semitones. So using your example I would think of A, then count up four semitones (Bb, B, C, C#) landing on C#. Interval, Semitone Count Unison, 0 Minor Second, 1 Major Second, 2 Minor Third, 3 Major Second, 4 Perfect Fourth, 5 Tritone, 6 Perfect Fifth, 7 Minor Sixth, 8 Major Sixth, 9 Minor ...


6

No. The intervals chosen for ear training don't have to based on the tonic of a song. 1 up to 6 (Do up to La) is a major sixth just like 5 up to 3 (Sol up to Mi) and just like 5 up to 1 (Sol up to Do) is a perfect fourth just like 1 up to 4 (Do up to Fa). You can take any relative interval for training it really doesn't matter if it is the tonic or not ...


5

All intervals can be turned upside down.(Called inverted). Thus a C-E as a major third, when played E-C becomes a minor sixth. There is a 'rule of nine'.Minors become majors, majors become minors, augmenteds become diminisheds, etc. The exceptions are the octaves, 4ths and 5ths. (Unison doesn't count !) Those do not change their identities. A 4th of C-F ...


5

A “perfect” interval is one that has nice small integer frequency ratios in Pythagorean tuning. These are traditionally considered the most consonant intervals. P1 = 1:1 P8 = 2:1 P5 = 3:2 P4 = 4:3 Major and minor intervals have more complex ratios: M2 = 9:8 m7 = 16:9 M6 = 27:16 m3 = 32:27 M3 = 81:64 m6 = 128:81 M7 = 243:128 m2 = 256:243 ...


5

The answers provided here offer a useful trick, which is to quickly translate into a scale you already know to find the answer. For instance, if you know that C to E is a major third, then it must be the case that Cb to Eb is a major third and also that C# to E# is a major third, too. It's fine to use this trick when it comes in handy, but it sounds like ...


5

Technically yes, but you would almost never see B♯♯ as B♯♯ is an enharmonic equivalent to C♯ which makes much more senses in most cases. Likewise I've never seen more than 3 accidentals applied to a note so a quadrupled sharped F you would never see. Going back to C♯, the equivalent interval would be G♯♯ or Gx better known as A. So yes B♯♯ to F♯♯♯♯ is an ...


4

This is kind of a pet peeve of mine. If you are naming a note the accidental goes after the letter name. If you are naming an interval or scale degree the quality goes before the interval or scale degree. In general if you are unsure say it and it should make sense. Ex: C#- C sharp P5 - Perfect 5th b3 - flat third Now to the pet peeve. It is ...


4

One trick you can use is to remove the accidental from your starting note in order to make it a more common major scale, and then add the sharp back to the answer at the very end. I'll use your example: I want a major 3rd above G# Using your method, I know the answer should be some kind of B Whoa, G# Major is a crazy scale! Let's pretend it's just a G G ...


4

Are you talking about the piano here? Because on the piano, even single notes are more dissonant in the bass clef than in the treble clef (look up "disharmonicity") because of the thickness of strings. Also for low frequency you can hear more overtones, and consequently their possible clashes. And also for lower frequencies more beatings are in the ...


4

The problem with the definitions you dug up is that they refer to different things. The usual meaning of "perfect fifth" is in contrast to a "tempered fifth". In relation to a guitar, a perfect fifth is the interval you get between the first harmonic (over fret 12) and the second harmonic (over fret 7). When tuning, the most pleasing interval between most ...


4

The first thing to consider for 13-limit is the octave-reduce thirteenth harmonic, 13/8. It is the first sixth that occurs in the harmonic series and comes in at about 840.53 cents. It's pretty close to being smack dab in the middle of the 12tet minor sixth and major sixth. So, like 11-limit, this limit is going to contain some neutral intervals. In fact, ...


3

The standard notation I've seen is just to keep writing degree signs before the numerical interval for multiply diminished and plus signs for augmented. Your abbreviated version doesn't conflict with anything I've seen, bit I wouldn't immediately recognize it either. Just +++++5 for quintuply-augmented fifth. I think the use of d and A can be a little ...


3

Yep, correct. I think it's easiest to picture the perfect quality of 4ths, 5ths, 8ves, etc. as being taken over by two possibilities (M and m) in the other intervals. In other words, once you've compressed or expanded beyond the central quality(ies) ({P} or {m,M}) then the diminished and augmented stuff functions in the same way.



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