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18

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


13

In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


12

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


11

Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


11

The lowest notes on these examples must be written on the right of the chord. Not on the left or vertically centered as shown above.


10

My answer builds on the answer contributed by DR6. Based on your reaction to other very good answers posted here already, your question seems to boil down to: "Why do humans innately feel that certain intervals are consonant". And so much so that they are willing to call them "perfect". Before getting to that question, let's look at why Western culture ...


10

Just to add to Patrx2 answer there are a total of four types of motion in counterpoint. They are: oblique - one note moves while the other doesn't contrary - the notes move in the opposite direction similar - the notes move in the same direction, but different intervals (i.e. one moves a 2nd and the other moves a 3rd) parallel - the notes move in the same ...


10

There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...


10

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


8

An interval is just the distance between two notes. The name perfect 5th comes from the idea of a scale. For example the C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The 5th note of the scale is G hence the 5th of the C major scale is G. The interval is perfect because if we flip the interval we would get a 4th which exist in the G major ...


7

Parallel movement in intervals is when two voices (notes) move the same distance( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ect ) in the same direction. This can be applied to any interval including 7ths. Here is an example of parallel 7ths: As you can see, C to B is a 7th and then both move up a 2nd to D and C respectively which is another 7th creating parallel 7ths because of how ...


7

Since both of them are flat, it is the same interval they would be without flats. So: Bb - Eb would be the same as B - E which is perfect fourth. Bb - Ab would be the same as B - A which is minor 7th. Bb -Db would be the same as B - D which is minor 3rd.


7

No. If the notes don't move, they aren't parallel octaves. Repeated notes act very much like tied notes. If you had moved both Es down to their respective neighbouring Ds, leaving the tenor and soprano static, that would be an example of parallel octaves.


6

I use a simpler method; counting semitones. A major third has 4 semitones. So using your example I would think of A, then count up four semitones (Bb, B, C, C#) landing on C#. Interval, Semitone Count Unison, 0 Minor Second, 1 Major Second, 2 Minor Third, 3 Major Second, 4 Perfect Fourth, 5 Tritone, 6 Perfect Fifth, 7 Minor Sixth, 8 Major Sixth, 9 Minor ...


6

No. The intervals chosen for ear training don't have to based on the tonic of a song. 1 up to 6 (Do up to La) is a major sixth just like 5 up to 3 (Sol up to Mi) and just like 5 up to 1 (Sol up to Do) is a perfect fourth just like 1 up to 4 (Do up to Fa). You can take any relative interval for training it really doesn't matter if it is the tonic or not ...


5

The answers provided here offer a useful trick, which is to quickly translate into a scale you already know to find the answer. For instance, if you know that C to E is a major third, then it must be the case that Cb to Eb is a major third and also that C# to E# is a major third, too. It's fine to use this trick when it comes in handy, but it sounds like ...


5

A “perfect” interval is one that has nice small integer frequency ratios in Pythagorean tuning. These are traditionally considered the most consonant intervals. P1 = 1:1 P8 = 2:1 P5 = 3:2 P4 = 4:3 Major and minor intervals have more complex ratios: M2 = 9:8 m7 = 16:9 M6 = 27:16 m3 = 32:27 M3 = 81:64 m6 = 128:81 M7 = 243:128 m2 = 256:243 ...


5

Technically yes, but you would almost never see B♯♯ as B♯♯ is an enharmonic equivalent to C♯ which makes much more senses in most cases. Likewise I've never seen more than 3 accidentals applied to a note so a quadrupled sharped F you would never see. Going back to C♯, the equivalent interval would be G♯♯ or Gx better known as A. So yes B♯♯ to F♯♯♯♯ is an ...


5

A Semitone is the next physical adjacent note on a piano after a given pitch. Semitones are also often called "half-steps". If you pick a note on the piano, and count seven half-steps higher or lower, it will result in a perfect-fifth. For Example: A given fundamental note is "C". "C" to "C#" is one semitone. C->C#, C#->D, D->D#, D#->E, E->F, F->F#, ...


5

The problem with the definitions you dug up is that they refer to different things. The usual meaning of "perfect fifth" is in contrast to a "tempered fifth". In relation to a guitar, a perfect fifth is the interval you get between the first harmonic (over fret 12) and the second harmonic (over fret 7). When tuning, the most pleasing interval between most ...


5

On the face of it, it doesn't make sense. But intervals are taken from the major scale notes. Thus a major 3rd is, say, from C to E. When an interval is made smaller by a semitone, it's called a minor. Thus a minor 3rd is C to Eb. Yes, it happens to be in the minor scale/key as well. This applies to most intervals, but not perfect ones - fifths, for ...


5

You wrote: considering that in the natural scales formulae, they are both one whole step This is the crux of your question. M2 and m2 (major 2nd and minor 2nd) intervals are not both whole steps. Only the M2 is a whole step. The m2 is a half step. Nonetheless, in the diatonic scale, each can represent a step. Step-wise motion includes m2s and M2s, ...


5

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


4

The term "Perfect Fifth" is used to define an interval between two notes in a diatonic scale in Western Music. It's confusing because "fifth" sounds like a fraction (as in one fifth of 100 = 20). But while there is a ratio involved (the frequency ratio of the sound waves between the bass and high note) the term fifth as used in "Perfect Fifth" does not ...


4

Are you talking about the piano here? Because on the piano, even single notes are more dissonant in the bass clef than in the treble clef (look up "disharmonicity") because of the thickness of strings. Also for low frequency you can hear more overtones, and consequently their possible clashes. And also for lower frequencies more beatings are in the ...


4

One trick you can use is to remove the accidental from your starting note in order to make it a more common major scale, and then add the sharp back to the answer at the very end. I'll use your example: I want a major 3rd above G# Using your method, I know the answer should be some kind of B Whoa, G# Major is a crazy scale! Let's pretend it's just a G G ...


4

The major intervals 2, 3, 6, and 7 come indeed from the major scale. However, as you noted, the corresponding minor intervals do not come from the (natural) minor scale, because then there wouldn't be any minor 2nd interval. All minor intervals can be obtained from the descending major scale. If we use C major as an example, a minor 2nd is the interval ...


4

The first thing to consider for 13-limit is the octave-reduce thirteenth harmonic, 13/8. It is the first sixth that occurs in the harmonic series and comes in at about 840.53 cents. It's pretty close to being smack dab in the middle of the 12tet minor sixth and major sixth. So, like 11-limit, this limit is going to contain some neutral intervals. In fact, ...


4

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


3

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...



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