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14

It's more about context than it is about written music. It's called a third because it's the third step in the scale. Take the C major scale for example. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C D E F G A B The C major chord is C E G: the first, third, and fifth steps (degrees) of the C major scale. It's the same case with minor triads. Here is the C minor scale: ...


12

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


10

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


10

There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...


10

Just to add to Patrx2 answer there are a total of four types of motion in counterpoint. They are: oblique - one note moves while the other doesn't contrary - the notes move in the opposite direction similar - the notes move in the same direction, but different intervals (i.e. one moves a 2nd and the other moves a 3rd) parallel - the notes move in the same ...


7

On the face of it, it doesn't make sense. But intervals are taken from the major scale notes. Thus a major 3rd is, say, from C to E. When an interval is made smaller by a semitone, it's called a minor. Thus a minor 3rd is C to Eb. Yes, it happens to be in the minor scale/key as well. This applies to most intervals, but not perfect ones - fifths, for ...


7

No. If the notes don't move, they aren't parallel octaves. Repeated notes act very much like tied notes. If you had moved both Es down to their respective neighbouring Ds, leaving the tenor and soprano static, that would be an example of parallel octaves.


6

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


6

You wrote: considering that in the natural scales formulae, they are both one whole step This is the crux of your question. M2 and m2 (major 2nd and minor 2nd) intervals are not both whole steps. Only the M2 is a whole step. The m2 is a half step. Nonetheless, in the diatonic scale, each can represent a step. Step-wise motion includes m2s and M2s, ...


6

No. The intervals chosen for ear training don't have to based on the tonic of a song. 1 up to 6 (Do up to La) is a major sixth just like 5 up to 3 (Sol up to Mi) and just like 5 up to 1 (Sol up to Do) is a perfect fourth just like 1 up to 4 (Do up to Fa). You can take any relative interval for training it really doesn't matter if it is the tonic or not ...


6

There's no standard precise definition of what a blue note is. In some cases, a blue note could be seen as a deviation from the pitch of the note of a 'standard' (e.g. major) scale, but in other cases, blue notes are used in music whose tonality is far enough removed from the major or minor scale that those scales are arguably not sensible reference points ...


6

The minor intervals are not minor because they are found in the minor scale and the same goes for major intervals. The intervals are concepts based on the distance between two notes based on letter name and absolute distance in semitones. It should also be noted that the term major and minor is used a lot in music and when applied to interval major means ...


5

It's intriguing that you mention this, because your suggestion that we call a major triad 1,5,8 is very close to how musical set theory works. In set theory, one of the primary goals is to classify harmonies as objectively as possible without privileging any scale (or indeed the entire idea of key and enharmonic pitches). The only primary difference is that ...


4

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


4

The major intervals 2, 3, 6, and 7 come indeed from the major scale. However, as you noted, the corresponding minor intervals do not come from the (natural) minor scale, because then there wouldn't be any minor 2nd interval. All minor intervals can be obtained from the descending major scale. If we use C major as an example, a minor 2nd is the interval ...


4

The first thing to consider for 13-limit is the octave-reduce thirteenth harmonic, 13/8. It is the first sixth that occurs in the harmonic series and comes in at about 840.53 cents. It's pretty close to being smack dab in the middle of the 12tet minor sixth and major sixth. So, like 11-limit, this limit is going to contain some neutral intervals. In fact, ...


4

You want to name intervals "absolutely" whereas the standard naming of them is in terms of "scale steps". Now all of our Western music actually tends to happen in scales: one typical simple accompaniment of a melody is to just play the same melody a third down or a sixth up. But whether this third happens to be a minor or major one depends on its position ...


4

First of all, Dm7 has no B but a C (as already pointed out in a comment by Tim): Dm7: D F A C The D minor pentatonic scale clearly fits over a Dm7 chord, because it contains all chord tones and it adds one note (the G), which is a cool-sounding tension on Dm7 (the 11). Note that the D minor pentatonic scale is not the only pentatonic scale you can play ...


4

They are two different concepts completely, although the blue notes do typically take advantage of the tritone via harmony and melody. A tritone is a specific interval of an augmented fourth (A4) or a diminished fifth (d5). It's a very special interval as it's the furthest distance in semitones you can be away from a note and it's dissonance and how it ...


3

Yes, in the sense that a perfect 15th or 22nd, etc., of C1 will be a C♮, not C♭ (which forms a diminished interval) or C♯ (which forms an augmented interval). The type of an interval remains the same after octave transposition, e.g., a minor third transposed an octave becomes a minor tenth, a perfect fifth becomes a perfect 12th, etc.


3

The terminology is confusing here, because "major" and "minor" have two different meanings. One meaning is "major and minor scales". The other, which is taken directly from Latin, is that "major" means "big" and "minor" means "small". A "second" means an interval between two successive note-letters in a scale - taking into account any sharps or flats in the ...


3

A major second interval consists of 2 semitones (or as you say a whole step) whereas a minor second interval consists of a semitone. Example of major second is C - D. Example of minor second interval is B - C. " considering that in the natural scales formulae, they are both one whole step ?" this is wrong. Of the second intervals only the major second ...


3

I'm not going to lie, Just Intonation is not my forte, and I hate math, so I'll spare most of the number-talk. From what I've read from a few difference sources (some of which are outline below), there are a few reasons why there is little discussion / application of extended-limit ratios: In Harry Partch's landmark text The Genesis of Music, he simply ...


3

Yes, moving chromatically within one voice is totally fine. It's actually a secret trick composers use to get choirs to sing atonal / pantonal music. That said, if it's too chromatic, you'll have problems. Typically in choral writing, certain movements are "not allowed" because they are difficult to "hear" in the mind before the person sings. Intervals ...


3

The perfect fifth's size is 7 semitones. So, let's count them from C: C-C# C#-D D-D# D#-E E-F F-F# F#-G. If we count 7 semitones, we end up on G natural, and not G#. Also, if we had a chord that consisted of C,E and G#, it wouldn't be C major; it would be C augmented. A major chord is built with a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. The ...


2

In music theory "Whole step" has a special meaning. The distance from one note on the piano keyboard to the next highest (whether it be a black note, C to C# or a white one, E to F) is called a "Half Step". Two half steps make a "Whole step". In British English we say "semitone" and "tone". A major scale goes Whole step, Whole, Half, Whole, Whole, ...


2

There are also psychoaccoustical reasons, the most relevant in this situation being that the critical band is roughly 100 Hz and constant from 500 Hz and below. This means that a C0 (16) and G0 (24) dyad would be within the same critical band and be processed simultanously but a C4 (256) and G4 (384) dyad would be in different critical bands and thus ...


2

Every one of your intervals looks right, but I'll explain a little more. When people use numbers to represent notes like above, they always do it in reference to the major scale. So the interval they correlate to is: 1 - P1 2 - M2 3 - M3 4 - P4 5 - P5 6 - M6 7 - M7 8 - P8 9 - M9 10 - M10 11 - P11 12 - P12 13 - M13 14 - M14 15 - P15 ... The sharps and ...


2

Finger substitution is not the way to go, unless you are playing an organ and not the piano. Absolute legato on the piano isn't as important as playing the notes with even tempo and dynamics. If you have small hands you can play the whole passage fingered 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 5 4 1 2 1 4 1 4 etc. Learn to "jump" unobtrusively between 5 and 4. You can cover the ...


2

That is bach's cello prelude from suite no1? I used to play that on the piano, and I always stretched. As you get more advanced, you will be playing pieces that require this kind of stretching, and you will learn how to quickly adjust your hand in order to allow your fingers to go where they need to go. I am not sure what finger substitution is in this ...



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