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17

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features ...


14

It's more about context than it is about written music. It's called a third because it's the third step in the scale. Take the C major scale for example. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C D E F G A B The C major chord is C E G: the first, third, and fifth steps (degrees) of the C major scale. It's the same case with minor triads. Here is the C minor scale: ...


10

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


10

There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...


10

Yes indeed there is a key of C Sharp Major (C# Major). But the key of C Sharp Major is the “enharmonic equivalent” of the key of D Flat Major. What that means is that all of the notes in the C sharp major scale sound pretty much exactly the same (to the human ear) as all the notes in the D Flat major scale – only they are notated (written) differently. ...


9

You have: B# - C: Diminished 2nd (same as B-Cb) B - C: Minor 2nd B - C#: Major 2nd (same as Bb - C) Bb -C#: Augmented 2nd If I'm not mistaken, there are also double diminished and double augmented intervals, like Bb - Cx but rarely used Generally the interval qualities are: Diminished, Minor, Major, Augmented or Diminished, Perfect, Augmented.


8

When you come across something like this, you should remove all the accidentals and add them one at a time: C- E: major 3rd C- E#:augmented 3rd C -Ex: double augmented 3rd Cb- Ex: triple augmented 3rd Cbb-Ex: quadruple augmented 3rd. Which I doubt you'll ever meet, even if it exists. Most likely it'll be Bb -F# which is a augmented 5th interval or Bb - ...


6

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


6

There's no standard precise definition of what a blue note is. In some cases, a blue note could be seen as a deviation from the pitch of the note of a 'standard' (e.g. major) scale, but in other cases, blue notes are used in music whose tonality is far enough removed from the major or minor scale that those scales are arguably not sensible reference points ...


6

The minor intervals are not minor because they are found in the minor scale and the same goes for major intervals. The intervals are concepts based on the distance between two notes based on letter name and absolute distance in semitones. It should also be noted that the term major and minor is used a lot in music and when applied to interval major means ...


6

It would be a quadruply augmented 3rd and would be written as AAAA3. C to E alone is obviously a major third (M3). From there realize that by adding a double sharp to the E you increase the distance by two semitones the and the resulting interval C to E♯♯ is a doubly augmented third (AA3). From there you can see by lowing the C two semitones ...


5

It's intriguing that you mention this, because your suggestion that we call a major triad 1,5,8 is very close to how musical set theory works. In set theory, one of the primary goals is to classify harmonies as objectively as possible without privileging any scale (or indeed the entire idea of key and enharmonic pitches). The only primary difference is that ...


5

Once a melody is composed and written in one key using the notes from said key's corresponding scale, that same melody can then be "transposed" (converted) to any other key that exist in Western music. The process of composing any piece of music follows a strict methodology. Below I will explain the process of transposing any piece of music from one key ...


4

Every one of your intervals looks right, but I'll explain a little more. When people use numbers to represent notes like above, they always do it in reference to the major scale. So the interval they correlate to is: 1 - P1 2 - M2 3 - M3 4 - P4 5 - P5 6 - M6 7 - M7 8 - P8 9 - M9 10 - M10 11 - P11 12 - P12 13 - M13 14 - M14 15 - P15 ... The sharps and ...


4

You want to name intervals "absolutely" whereas the standard naming of them is in terms of "scale steps". Now all of our Western music actually tends to happen in scales: one typical simple accompaniment of a melody is to just play the same melody a third down or a sixth up. But whether this third happens to be a minor or major one depends on its position ...


4

First of all, Dm7 has no B but a C (as already pointed out in a comment by Tim): Dm7: D F A C The D minor pentatonic scale clearly fits over a Dm7 chord, because it contains all chord tones and it adds one note (the G), which is a cool-sounding tension on Dm7 (the 11). Note that the D minor pentatonic scale is not the only pentatonic scale you can play ...


4

They are two different concepts completely, although the blue notes do typically take advantage of the tritone via harmony and melody. A tritone is a specific interval of an augmented fourth (A4) or a diminished fifth (d5). It's a very special interval as it's the furthest distance in semitones you can be away from a note and it's dissonance and how it ...


4

There are no chords that has a diminished second as part of the chord for the obvious reason that the enharmonic equivalent of it would be a perfect unison which is already part of every chord. If you do come across one, just view it as a unison instead of a second as that's almost surely how it's being used.


3

The perfect fifth's size is 7 semitones. So, let's count them from C: C-C# C#-D D-D# D#-E E-F F-F# F#-G. If we count 7 semitones, we end up on G natural, and not G#. Also, if we had a chord that consisted of C,E and G#, it wouldn't be C major; it would be C augmented. A major chord is built with a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. The ...


3

Yes, moving chromatically within one voice is totally fine. It's actually a secret trick composers use to get choirs to sing atonal / pantonal music. That said, if it's too chromatic, you'll have problems. Typically in choral writing, certain movements are "not allowed" because they are difficult to "hear" in the mind before the person sings. Intervals ...


3

You either needed a reference pitch to calculate all other notes or you need to have all the pitches defined. Every formula to obtain a pitch needs a reference pitch and you need to know how that pitch relates to the one you are calculating. The pitch you are using is relative to a system whether it is equal temperament, just, Pythagoras, ect. The ...


3

There are a number of reasons why notes cannot be said to have exact pitches... As well as just intonation which represents the purest, most consonant tuning possible, many different systems of temperament are possible. Equal temperament is particularly common these days, but in many situations musicians will still gravitate towards something closer to ...


3

There may be confusion between 'ordinary' notes (C, E, A -white keys on piano) and the # and b ( black keys).Don't think that 'ordinary' notes are any different from 'accidental' notes. When tuned to A=440Hz, then A will be that. Since, on violin, it's an open string, it can't be bent up or down from that, can it? I think what's trying to be said is that ...


2

There are also psychoaccoustical reasons, the most relevant in this situation being that the critical band is roughly 100 Hz and constant from 500 Hz and below. This means that a C0 (16) and G0 (24) dyad would be within the same critical band and be processed simultanously but a C4 (256) and G4 (384) dyad would be in different critical bands and thus ...


2

You should not have to wait too long before listening for the next interval. If your ears are trained well enough, you should be able to listen to a passage of music and hear what notes/chords/intervals are played without a problem at any reasonable speed. My guess is that you just do not have enough experience distinguishing between these intervals yet ...


2

The intervals are not named in relation to their distance in a chromatic scale, but rather by their distance in a diatonic scale. In other words, the interval names reflect the number of diatonic scale steps between two notes. Since diatonic scale steps come in two sizes (whole steps and half steps) there are different ways to combine them, and the resulting ...


2

I think it's probably the best term. In A minor, for example, the step between the 6th and 7th notes is a second. F to G. When this changes, in harmonic minor, it's stretched to F and G#, the interval is still a second, but is now called an augmented second. It certainly won't be a minor third ! If the letter names remain the same, but the gap is widened, ...


2

Intervals are not named for the major and minor scale, but the actual distance away from root note. Let's look at the typical intervals you would see with a root of A before we discuss what Ab would look like. Typically, when you talk about intervals with the root of A, you will have these notes: A - Bb - B - C - C# - D - (D#/Eb)* - E - F - F# - G - G# - A ...


2

A couple of additional notes that might help answer your question: The "blues scale" was developed to to play one set of notes over all the chords in a twelve bar blues, so the blues scale based on A minor pentatonic is played over a twelve bar blues starting on A7, even though the major third does not technically occur in the scale (this is why chords with ...



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