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If you're running Windows then I would suggest RandomABC (SightRead.zip) which generates random ABCNotation tunes within a a given range. Then you could just print out random scores to test your sightreading. You could also manipulate the ABC files for any interval range you were interested. So spend a couple of hours generating the tunes you want, print ...


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All theories are only tools to serve a purpose. Chord theory serves the purposes of systemisation so as to communicate information. There are NO rules in music. One can make any sound and if is pleasant to the performer and his/her audience then throw the rule book into the garbage !


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JP Doherty has correctly identified the chord. A more mainstreamed naming convention of his answer, however, is DbMsus4+. From my "Understanding Guitar Chords": "Distinguishing between chord quality & interval quality. A symbol specifying chord quality, when necessary, appears directly after the chord name; otherwise the symbol refers to ...


2

Dissonances as such aren't much of an issue – resolving a dissonant chord into a consonance to give that consonance a "finality" is one of the most important things in classical harmony. That's not the trouble. Your chord has two other problems though: What's dissonant? Well, as you've written it and intend the "diminished first" to work, the root would ...


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Chord naming and interval naming are two pretty different things -- for example, your Db-F#-A-C chord's name would more likely focus on the F#, since you create a minor triad between F#-A-Db(C#). That's all highly contextual, and talking about prime or octave intervals in chord context is extremely rare. For the interval naming question, my understanding ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


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Neutral intervals are usually voiced with the major and the minor simultaneously on chromatic instruments that only have semitones (fretted instruments, most valved winds and keyboards without pitch bending). Eg. an A neutral consists of an A, a C half-sharp (it's the quartertone between C and C#, for the notation imagine the # but with only one vertical ...


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You are correct that Ab minor must contain a Cb, not any form of B (even though Cb and B are "enharmonically equivalent", Cb is the correct spelling here). However, there are contexts in which two different versions (e.g. sharp and natural) of the same base note can sound together. When this occurs, it is called a "chromatic contradiction," or a False ...


15

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


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There are only 351 possible different chords (strictly chord classes). This is considerably less than the 2047 suggested above because some chords are inversions of others. Fore example C6 has the same notes as Am7. So if you want to know how many different chords there are (counting all As for example as the same note) there are 19 with 3 notes 43 with 4 ...



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