New answers tagged

0

This can be answered fairly simply. The inversion of a doubly augmented seventh is a doubly diminished second. A doubly diminished second is -1 semitone, so it's more than "OK" that the (nominally) "lower" pitch is higher; it follows naturally from the definition. If you descend by -1 semitones, you go up in pitch.


2

You are dealing with extremes of intervals so the result may not be straightforward and I can almost guarantee you will never see anything like that in practice. In general doubly diminished and augmented intervals are only seen in 4ths and 5ths due to them being perfect and are extremely rare in practical music as seen in and explained this question. In ...


2

The other upvoted answers here are good and I don't want to repeat them, but I think that there is a lot to add. Surely the key of C-Sharp Major must exist! So why is it never or rarely used? There are several factors that need to be taken into consideration. Here I list a few: Historical To understand modern scales you need to look at how they ...


-1

Shorter answer: Every note in a scale must be named A, B, C... etc. in ascending order but with as many accidentals like sharp and flat as necessary. Therefore, the note before C# (major 7th) is B sharp (the same as C natural), and E# (same as F natural) is the third which is annoying to work with.


17

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features ...


10

Yes indeed there is a key of C Sharp Major (C# Major). But the key of C Sharp Major is the “enharmonic equivalent” of the key of D Flat Major. What that means is that all of the notes in the C sharp major scale sound pretty much exactly the same (to the human ear) as all the notes in the D Flat major scale – only they are notated (written) differently. ...


0

You change the key to the interval you want to transpose. With this new key you can just change the notes the amount of spaces up or down and they will all be the same interval. What do I mean by this? Let me further elaborate trough the use of an example. Lets say you want to transpose a passage that is in C major a Major third up. You use the key that is ...


2

Following on from Rockin's excellent answer, it's apparent that KNOWING your keys and their respective signatures ('sharps and flats') is going to make the process much quicker to execute. On guitar, when using tunes that don't use open strings, the process won't use quite so much brain power. Just as a capo can help change key, you can do the same sort of ...


5

Once a melody is composed and written in one key using the notes from said key's corresponding scale, that same melody can then be "transposed" (converted) to any other key that exist in Western music. The process of composing any piece of music follows a strict methodology. Below I will explain the process of transposing any piece of music from one key ...



Top 50 recent answers are included