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This depends in large part whether we're talking about "fixed do" or "movable do" solfege, so I'll answer from each perspective: Movable Do In movable-do solfege, the syllables mark the scale degree rather than the absolute pitch of the note, so the syllables used will vary depending on the key in which the chord appears. In practice, diminished seventh ...


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Hypothesis: Natural: Major triad: C E G, 3 notes with vertical relationship (has nothing to do with static harmonic overtones). Manipulated: Minor triad: The major third (is omitted) and replaced by a minor third, in fact a b10 (!), who can resolve over the 9th or b9th to the root (Eb -> D(b) - > C) This b10 is an appoggiatura and has a horizontal ...


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As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


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To answer 2: yes, for any n, if n is even, then half an octave is n/2 divisions. (This is rather boringly obvious, so perhaps I don't understand the question.) I don't understand what you mean by "unique".


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Two other importantnotes in a given key (which are the basis for main chords) are the 4th and 5th notes of a major scale, being 5 and 7 semitones from the root respectively. Giving the subdominant and the dominant. That puts a tritone right between them, neither one or the other, but too close to sound consonant. Yes, mathematically it could be construed ...


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I had a go on the website to whcih you referred - that's a great site ! I did quite well I think but it seems for me the larger intervals - 7ths / tritones etc are harder to get. I'm quite good at recognising chord structure and intervals in songs by ear. That's a bit different to the exercise on that website because there's generally a key and a context in ...


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Melody and harmony are highly intertwined. As such, I've found that practicing intervals as a function of harmony to be the most practical and useful way to work on ear training both personally and with students. I do this by singing against/with a drone; I personally use the Tuning CD ...


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To these excellent suggestions I would add -- every time you practice, don't just rely on the computer app and don't just rely on your singing voice and your ear. Also go to an instrument and play those intervals while you study. Pick any note at random and find the specific interval above and below. Train not only your voice and your ear, but also your ...


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Just commenting on the "which intervals to focus on first" part. Can't/Don't want to improve in JCPedroza's answer other than that. I disagree about all of the intervals being equal. Some of them are much more rare than others. Some are much easier than others. This isn't just individual taste, some are objectively cleaner than others because their ratios ...


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Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. ...


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There aren't any special intervals you should focus on. All of them are equally important. What you can do is to find songs you know, with melodies you can sing, and see what kind of intervals they use. This way you'll remember what the intervals sound like. Now, no one can really suggest these kind of songs to you. They have to be songs you know and ...



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