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Your problem MAY be that you start on one note - call it a 'root', and the interval to the next note isn't that difficult to recognise. When you then move to a different 'root', the sound is blurred by the interval that's produced by the second/third notes. Try keeping the same 'root', and listen to different intervals just from that note. Then choose a ...


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Every interval has a specific sound - but everyone of us may perceive that differently. But you can build some personalized mnemonic aid especially for you. Custom as it were ;-) I'll tell you some of mine just to give you an idea of how this could work for you. I'll start off with the b7th: Leonard Bernstein - my hero, as conductor and composer -> ...


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You should not have to wait too long before listening for the next interval. If your ears are trained well enough, you should be able to listen to a passage of music and hear what notes/chords/intervals are played without a problem at any reasonable speed. My guess is that you just do not have enough experience distinguishing between these intervals yet ...


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Whether or not notes are dropped on the harmony instrument (piano or guitar) partly depends on the voicing. It's perfectly acceptable to play both 3rd and 11 or #11, but you may choose to do this with a spread apart voicing rather than close together. The jazz pianist usually includes the third and seventh, as you know (or the 4th if sus), with everything ...


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I'm going to disagree with some of the advice in other answers. There is a very basic mistake which is easy for beginners to fall into without really thinking about it, and that is to assume that "you play the piano with your fingers". To get beyond simple playing technique, you have to realize that you really play with piano with your arms, and even with ...


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The key (as is almost always the case when you feel aches and pains from piano) is relaxation. Each of your fingers only needs to be "active" (i.e. not relaxed) at the instant it actually strike a key, because you can move from key to key and hold keys down while relaxing that finger. In fact, if you are not relaxed, you are inhibiting your movement ...


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A perfect fifth occurs when the fifth interval, the fifth note in a scale, contains seven semitones. For example, in the case of the scale that starts with C, G is the fifth interval because it is the fifth note from C. G is also a perfect fifth because there are seven semitones from C to G. Count them up: C-D (a tone=2 semitones) D-E(a tone=2 ...


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Positioning The correct way to play octaves is to keep the wrist completely still and relaxed while your fingers do all the "leg work." Moving your wrist up and down will cause your fingers to have uneven lengths when reaching the keyboard. Keeping your wrist still and slightly below the keyboard will even out the length of your fingers so that they have ...


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If you're going up or down the piano playing octaves you'll need to move your arm, but you should minimize the movement as much as possible. A lot of times beginners will move their arm up much more than they need to in general when moving up or down the piano. Minimizing the movement minimizes the distance you need to move from one octave to another. As ...



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