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19

Yes, you're right. As for why the harmonic series doesn't produce notes that work in all keys, the simple answer is that the math just doesn't add up. Let's work out the math for just intonation: Suppose you choose X Hz for the fundamental frequency and go from there. Then the octave above the fundamental should have frequency 2 X Hz. Meanwhile, the ...


14

There are at least two things wrong in how your mandolin is calibrated, according to your excellent and helpful photographs. Your wooden bridge saddle needs to be replaced because it is cracked in half, between the first and second pairs of strings. You can clearly see that the bridge saddle has collapsed and caved in, downward toward the top of the ...


10

I would say yes, and yes. You've explained the problem pretty clearly, and explained its consequence. Choirs frequently find that they sing everything internally, consistently in-tune throughout a piece, but then at the end of the piece, they discover that they are no longer in tune with the reference pitches upon which they started the piece. The frame of ...


9

You have asked two questions. First "What is the measurement of the G-string that you should use on your Epiphone Les Paul guitar?" The correct technical term for what you call the "width" or "thickness" or "diameter" of the string is its gauge. Take your guitar to a qualified guitar technician or luthier, or at least to your local music store, and have ...


9

Schoenberg is talking about the difference between just intonation (which he refers to as "natural semi-tones") and 12-tone equal temperament (which he refers to as "tempered" semi-tones). This is a complicated subject. You can find several long posts about this subject on this site, or you can find a lot of references elsewhere on the Internet. The gist of ...


8

I wish to elaborate on @Tim's answer, which is correct. Actually, it was easier to discern the "color" before the modern system of 12-tone equal temperament for piano tuning. In Chopin's time and before, pianos and other keyboard instruments were tuned to one of many different systems of temperament, some of which sounded quite different in certain keys, ...


7

Standard tuning for solo violin in classical music is just intonation. Tune the A string and, from there, tune the other strings with just-intonated perfect fifths. Some times, as a compromise you may need to tune the violin temperate, for example when you need to play many open strings in duo/ensemble with a instrument not capable of just-intonation. ...


6

It shouldn't damage anything. However, it will make the strings slightly closer together and it may cause additional wear at the point the string goes over the saddle, since you are now causing a slight sideways angle. If you go through a few sets of strings and aren't breaking an unreasonable amount of strings because of it, you should be fine. A tiny ...


6

An article by Joe Monzo at http://tonalsoft.com/enc/s/savart.aspx defines the savart as 1/300 of an octave. A savart is calculated as the 300th root of 2, or 2(1/300), with a ratio of approximately 1:1.002313162. It is an irrational number. A savart has an interval size of approximately 4 cents. savart = 1000log10(f2/f1) cents = 1200log2(f2/f1)


5

Probably before temperate tuning, where each note is the same distance from the next, it would have been possible to discern - maybe because an instrument could sound in tune in one key, but not in a different key ! Please look at Wheat's answer for enlightenment on tuning. Someone who has absolute ('perfect') pitch will be able to tell, because they ...


5

Now that you've explained that your tuning is G-D-D-F-G#-B, I understand why you have problems with intonation, and problems with some strings being too high over the nut or bridge. From your earlier comment, do you mean to say that your local guitar store selected six individual strings for you based on those pitches in your tuning? Or did they sell you a ...


5

If it's an exceedingly low-quality product, it could just be that the fretboard is badly designed enough that the notes are just not in the right place, but realistically, all guitars exhibit tuning issues with fretted notes. Equal temperament is a compromise to begin with, and the guitar itself even more so. Assuming it's not actually a manufacturing ...


4

I have often found it helpful to use mental cues to aid pitch when I'm having trouble. I have heard many choral directors, as well as my own college voice professor, talk about 'landing on top of the pitch'. This really has to do with a sort of 'musical momentum,' almost as if our pitch were an object governed by Newton's first law. When a melodic line is ...


4

Get the heaviest gauge strings that you can handle, don't worry about the material properties of the strings. The string tension itself is the primary variable affecting unintentional bending. Obviously, using heavier gauge strings results in higher tension (for a given tuning) Note that longer scale length (e.g. 25.5") will also have higher string tension ...


4

As per the app you were asking, Pythagorean is the temperament you're looking for. The perfect fifth is the 2:3 frequency ratio (and small rational number frequency ratios are required for the sympathetic vibrations to work). So if your A string is 440 Hz, the tuning is as follows: E 660Hz A 440Hz D 293.33Hz G 195.56Hz If you tune by ear from A, your ...


3

You are working with a violin. It has four strings tuned in perfect fifths. Intonation on a violin, which has no frets, is something that you produce with your fingers, not with an electronic measuring device like your tuner. You can produce any kind of intonation or temperament on a violin that you can train your ears and fingers to recognize. You are not ...


3

Another factor is the frets on the guitar. Tall "jumbo" frets have more clearance between the top surface of the fret and the fingerboard. If you press down hard when you fret the string, the pitch might be pulled sharp. Tall frets have been popular on guitars for the last thirty years or so; "vintage" electric guitars tended to have small frets that are not ...


3

Okay, I've been working a while with many different fields of music... I certainly wouldn't say that vocals are my specialty; however, rather than doing what every other answer suggests (having you use a program that "trains" your intonation to become more in tune), I think it'd be a lot more effective and genuine if you were to just simply work on the ...


3

A relatively new company in Sweden, True Temperament, retrofits electric, acoustic and classical guitars with new necks or fingerboards with heavily modified fret positions that are designed to improve intonation. If I understand their intent, their "Thidell" design is for playing with something closer to pure intervals, but chiefly in the most common ...


3

Here is a table that I have adapted from one in Wikipedia that illustrates how just intonation differs from 12-tone equal temperament. In modern instrument tuning, an octave is divided into 1200 cents. There are 100 cents in an equal-tempered half-step, and all half-steps are equal in their distance apart. However, in just intonation, not all half-steps ...


3

Using a keyed instrument with Just Intonation creates a bunch of puzzles that need to be solved. You are either faced with observing limits on navigating from place to place, or doing "comma pumps" (equating near by intervals, or bend/vibrato between them because they are close enough). The problem isn't really Just Intonation though. It's caused by ...


2

I have come across an even more astonishing system for producing pure intervals on a guitar. A Turkish guitarist, Tolgahan Çoğulu, has patented a system for building a guitar that has channels under each string position that allows the quick installation or removal of any number of tiny partial frets, each one string-space wide, which can be adjusted up or ...


2

Search on youtube for singing exercises for your range. These exercises should just be a bunch of piano notes. On these exercises practice your vowels a lot. The 'ah' sound and 'eh' sounds are always a bit harder than the 'ii' sound for example. So start one of these tracks and sing 'ah-ah-ah' both legato en staccato on these notes. Make sure you are not ...


2

On some Gibsons/Epiphones, the saddles are triangular in section, as in a right-angled triangle. This means that it is possible to take off the saddle and turn it through 180 degrees, and the point of contact for the string will move back or forwards enough to get the extra adjustment for intonation you require.


2

If your out-of-range saddle is under plain string, you will probably be okay if you change string gauge (without changing action). If the out-of-range saddle is under a wound string, then it could go either way. Ideally speaking, gauge does not affect the intonation of unwound strings which are made of the same material and tuned to the same note in the ...


2

Following on from Wheat's superb answer, I'd initially use epoxy resin and a few hours in a vice to fix your bridge. This will obviate the need to replace - the existing one has the correct profile to fit the mandolin body. Upon re-fitting, make sure the intonation is good by checking open strings against 12th fret, both pressed down and with harmonics, ...


1

Indeed an unusual problem but a solution could be using longer setscrews to replace those adjusting the intonation.From the look of the whole bridge, this is feasible, but normally wouldn't be necessary.It would allow the saddles to be moved closer to the neck; there is always the possibility the bridge has been mounted slightly too far back. Obviously, the ...


1

This is a weird issue indeed for fixed bridges. Does your truss-rod need adjustment? Did you switch to a lighter gauge of strings recently? Putting heavier strings does require you to move the saddles back. But this is not a solution I would recommend ; you shouldn't change the gauge just because you can't fix your guitar. You should be able to play your ...


1

You cannot tell which configuration of sharps or flats are in a given key that is being played, when the modern equal temperament is used. The spacing between all the 12 semitones is identical, and so keys do not have their own color (beyond whatever color is imparted to them by their absolute tuning). When we modulate from, say, C to C#, the frequencies of ...


1

I doubt if you've turned the bridge by even one degree, so it won't hurt anything. On some guitars, the individual saddle can be unthreaded and turned through 180 degrees, to give more adjustment back or forth for intonating.Particularly those with triangular shaped saddles.Is it not possible to move the whole bridge assembly forward so that it is parallel ...



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