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14

I strongly suspect that practicing singing (I know, you said you can't, but trust me on this) will be the best possible thing for you. Unlike playing an instrument, singing removes all the extraneous technical baggage that sits between your mental musical intuition and the physical production of a musical sound, so its the most direct way to train your mind ...


11

No worries. Here are some things to help you get a better understanding of where your ears are at and how your brain processes it. DISCLAIMER: I am not a physician or am I qualified to recommend specialists. First thing you should do is visit an audiologist and get some testing done so that you have a base line reference to how you perceive sound vs. what ...


10

I would say yes, and yes. You've explained the problem pretty clearly, and explained its consequence. Choirs frequently find that they sing everything internally, consistently in-tune throughout a piece, but then at the end of the piece, they discover that they are no longer in tune with the reference pitches upon which they started the piece. The frame of ...


8

First off, there is no reason to give up music just because you can’t tell pitches apart. It’s a mountain of a problem, but not impossible. Filzilla gave some very good suggestions for where to start. Here’s a few more for after you’ve gotten a baseline from the audiologist. I’ll add the suggestion of voice games. Singing has the advantage that it is very ...


6

If it's an exceedingly low-quality product, it could just be that the fretboard is badly designed enough that the notes are just not in the right place, but realistically, all guitars exhibit tuning issues with fretted notes. Equal temperament is a compromise to begin with, and the guitar itself even more so. Assuming it's not actually a manufacturing ...


6

Yes string length does affect intonation and so does a proper set up with regard to neck, bridge, string guage, and action. Before going into any Bigsby enhancements lets review the key differences between a Gibson Tune-o-matic bridge vs. a Wraparound bridge. The Tune-o-matic allows for fine tuning the intonation, while the standard Wraparound has fixed ...


4

For a classical orchestra the priority is, to be in tune with your voice group e. g. first violins. A voice group consists of same instruments, so no problem, they play as you've been teached. The instruments with discrete tuning are only a few (piano, celesta, marimbaphone, xylophone, organ come to my mind) and these are unlikely to have prominent sustained ...


4

As per the app you were asking, Pythagorean is the temperament you're looking for. The perfect fifth is the 2:3 frequency ratio (and small rational number frequency ratios are required for the sympathetic vibrations to work). So if your A string is 440 Hz, the tuning is as follows: E 660Hz A 440Hz D 293.33Hz G 195.56Hz If you tune by ear from A, your ...


4

First of all, Pythagorean (PT), Just Intonation (JT) and Equal Temperament (ET) are different (families of) tunings. Therefore, note frequencies will be different in each case. You can find frequency charts for them on Wikipedia. For any tuning, you need a reference frequency. Currently, 440 Hz for A above middle C is the most widely used standard. But ...


3

Using a keyed instrument with Just Intonation creates a bunch of puzzles that need to be solved. You are either faced with observing limits on navigating from place to place, or doing "comma pumps" (equating near by intervals, or bend/vibrato between them because they are close enough). The problem isn't really Just Intonation though. It's caused by ...


3

Assuming A = 440 Hz, the octave starting on Middle C has the frequencies (in Hz): C♭ = 244.1687412149232 C = 260.74074074074076 (B♯3 = 264.298095703125) D♭ = 274.6898338667886 C♯ = 278.4375 D = 293.3333333333333 E♭ = 309.02606310013715 D♯ = 313.2421875 F♭ = 325.5583216198976 E = 330.0 F = 347.65432098765433 E♯ = 352.3974609375 G♭ = 366.2531118223848 F♯ = ...


2

To the best of my knowledge, Finale and its sound libraries do not support anything other than 12-tone equal-temperament at A=440 Hz. However, you can purchase the full version of the stand-alone Garritan Personal Orchestra program and use it with Finale in place of the built-in Finale sounds. Garritan Personal Orchestra's ARIA playback engine can be used ...


2

I was taught that when playing a triad, the third should be played sharper and the fifth flatter than the notes would normally sound. Uh, no? "Would normally sound" is usually used to describe the equally tempered scale whereas "playing a triad" implies a tendency towards pure intervals. A perfect major third is about 386 cents (14 cents flat from a ...


2

To clarify some points: It's the length of string between the saddle and the nut that affects intonation. An adjustable wraparound will fix intonation due to that length being adjustable. The part of the string after the saddle does not affect intonation, as noted by @Fergus. So yes, string length matters, but not the part behind the saddle like you get with ...


2

This looks like a hardtail Strat bridge; definitely not the "Tune-O-Matic" of a Gibson. I've had intonation issues before that seemingly defied a solution. Here are some suggestions: First, what's the difference in tuning between the 12th fret harmonic and the 12th fret itself? You need to make sure the problem really is in the saddle length. Pluck the ...


2

I want to make an addition to all these excellent answers. With just intonation, it's not possible to make all the chords just. Not even in a single key. Let's look at the common just major scale based on I, IV and V just major triads: C 1:1 D 9:8 E 5:4 F 4:3 G 3:2 A 5:3 B 15:8 In this scale, I, IV, V major triads (4:5:6) and iii and vi minor triads ...


2

Short answer, these days, for finding a tonic, you probably want to use ET (specifically 12-TET) because that's what everyone else uses. However it may depend on who else you're playing with, and what they're using, so tune to them. First, none of the tuning systems you mention specify an inherent reference pitch, so you'll need that as well. Sounds like ...


2

Well, it depends. When playing with 12-edo tuned instruments, basically you have no option but to adapt to their root: that tone needs to be spot on, regardless of whether you render third / leading tones in just / Pythagorean intonation in a way those instruments can't. Even when playing in a string ensemble or alone, 12-edo is quite a reasonable option ...


1

Use the frequencies of the open strings for the notes of the scale played on them, and calculate the tonic from there. You probably do this automatically when you play, so that a high G excites sympathetic vibrations on the G string and makes the tone sound richer.


1

What I have learned from composition and music history, is that regardless of the intellectual aesthetic, what matters when you get to the double bar is what sounds the best. Composers do not write squiggles down and figure out sounds to fit those squiggles, patting themselves on the back about how clever they are. Neither should you either fuss with ...


1

I don't know if this is the case here, but my first bass was an extremely cheap build, and I had something similar to this happening. What I think may be happening is that you're fretting on your lower fret (Lets say 12 for sake of argument), and it may be playing the tone that should be heard at 13, or 14 or 15, etc... as if you were fretting that note. ...


1

The file is a list of 128 integers -- each of which is the frequency of the corresponding midi note in miliHertz. The first line gives the frequency for midi note 0, the next for midi note 1 and so on. For A440, 12-tone equal temperament, lines 65-72 (inclusive) would be: --lines 1-64 (midi notes 0-63) snipped >> # next is midi 64 329628 349228 ...


1

The foundations of existing music theory were build when scientific data about sound perception were absent and they were inclined to number mysticism which source was that consonant music intervals correspond division of string in ratios of small integers. Now the following facts are known: -the sound signal of basic existing music instruments may be ...


1

Indeed an unusual problem but a solution could be using longer setscrews to replace those adjusting the intonation.From the look of the whole bridge, this is feasible, but normally wouldn't be necessary.It would allow the saddles to be moved closer to the neck; there is always the possibility the bridge has been mounted slightly too far back. Obviously, the ...


1

This is a weird issue indeed for fixed bridges. Does your truss-rod need adjustment? Did you switch to a lighter gauge of strings recently? Putting heavier strings does require you to move the saddles back. But this is not a solution I would recommend ; you shouldn't change the gauge just because you can't fix your guitar. You should be able to play your ...



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