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You want A=440hz if playing modern (post baroque) music; usually A=435 hz if playing baroque or earlier in or close to its original period intonations. Whether to use the 2/3 relationship also depends upon which intonation system is being used and which key. Pythagorean tuning at 2:3 resonance is "equal temperment" - which should NOT be used if doing ...


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I'll go against the stream here and say no, there is no (or very little) music that does not use discrete pitches, at least as resolutions. The very bendiest blues still lands on very solid chords- it slides around a lot, but the scale is there. Sure, there is certainly stuff with no discrete scale implied, but how many of you can hum a tune of it? Music ...


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John Luther Adams created a sonification for weather, astronomical and geological data in real time, called The Place Where You Go to Listen The sound parameters (mostly pitch, by I think others too) change "continuosly" (between comas, as of course we are talking about discrete digital events incrementally changing in time) according to the actual external ...


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"Harmonies" by Gyorgy Ligeti is an interesting example of microtonal music. It's written for organ, but it's intended to be played with reduced air and manipulation of the stops, so the pipes don't play at their designed frequency. With (mainly) slow chord changes and wide voicings the overall effect is a slowly evolving harmony and dissonance through the ...


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Well, how about the starting clarinet solo in Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"? It's been almost a century ago. Granted, doing the glissando continuously on its last part was not written into the score originally but was rather an impromptu trick by the clarinetist that the composer then insisted on incorporating into the premiere, but it has been very much ...


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A trivial answer : yes. When I was quite young I wrote a computer program to spit out a succession of 'beeps' at random frequencies not related to any musical scale; I suspect many people who have a computer and a bit of an interest in music have done the same. In practice how close you could get to infinity (!) would be limited by the resolution at which ...



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