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I have had the same type of problem with all of my Les Pauls which have the same type of tune-o-matic bridge and stop tail piece. I recommend that you try the previous answer and turn the saddle in question around and see if that gives you the extra room you need. If that doesn't give that extra room purchase a bridge that is wider and that will give you ...


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There's really no need for that. For intonation fine tuning, the little screw can be adjusted while the string is under tension, otherwise, the string will need re-tuning each time. As far as action goes, again, there's no need. In fact, it gets in the way to de-tension. A Tune-o-matic bridge has two screws, which will turn while the guitar is in tune. A ...


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With a Fender style bridge you just need to loosen one string a little and adjust height and intonation, then retension. To adjust intonation on a one piece (Les Paul style?) bridge you need to loosen a string quite a lot more to allow access to its intonation adjustment at the rear of the bridge. For height adjustment on a one piece bridge you'll need to ...


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Why do you want to take the strings off to do that? Slacken the one specific string you are working on slightly if you are raising the action or adjusting the intonation rearwards; keep compensating for pitch as you adjust. Otherwise it's just repetetive guesswork as to what it will be like once you reassemble it.


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I can strongly recommend reading Harry Partch's Genesis of a Music, in which he goes into depth on the history of tunings and the reasons for them. Out of this he derives his 43-tone-to-the-octave scale, and then talks about the instruments he had to build and adapt to play music in this scale, and the compositions he did using them, in detail. The 43-tone ...


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It is neither easy nor difficult to compose in JI, it is not a significant part of the history of western music, especially over the past 600± years. JI is based on the fundamental. Western music in developing tonality is based on sets of hierarchical relationships where 'scale degree' ^1 is more important than ^5, and harmonically, ^5 is more important than ...


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...or... Simple unstring, pull up the bridge (nothing holds it) and rotate 180 degree and put down. As I see current the nut in high E is wide enough to fit even the low E string. I risk the hypothesis that now the bridge is (accidentally) rotated compared to the factory at some past repair action. You win: All your saddles will rotated. One extra ...


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In your photo, it appears that the saddles have a wedge-shaped top that is angled on one side only, while the other side is straight/flat. Three appear to be angled in one direction (reflecting the light) and three appear to be wedged in the opposite direction (not reflecting the light). If you reverse a saddle like this, you should be able to get some ...


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You can try to change the top nut a little bit. Maybe carefully file out the slot/slit a little bit (so change it from the top). I did this with a an acoustic Suzuki Tree guitar and it made a small improvement.


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Unscrew a saddle so that the screw comes out completely. Turn the saddle through 180 degrees, and replace. It'll give another 2 or 3 mm of adjustment. The intonation looks a little out to me, as B strings are usually longer than the 1st and 3rd.To raise the action, use the two screws at either side of the bridge. Moving saddles tends to change the intonation ...


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Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


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Well, before the keyboard instruments were well tempered [think of the Well-Tempered Klavier], it was impossible to play in tune (i.e. with good intonation) in certain keys. And by the old system it would be impossible to do the annual (or semi-annual) tuning in such a way as to be able to play all keys in tune. Modern string players still have this ...


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A pithy way of saying it is that intonation is the process by which a temperament is achieved. Intonation is what is done in order that the sound is produced at the desired/intended pitch. This can be done as part of instrument setup, e.g. "setting the guitar intonation", or as an integral part of performing the music, e.g. as in expressive intonation. ...



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