Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

I'd say 2. is likely the closest, but it may just be as simple as personal taste. You're just not that used to hearing it and as you say, there's no emotion associated with it. I doubt I'd be capable of appreciating the subtle nuances and emotions in Indian Raga and I can't imagine such a melody stirring any great emotion in me. We have sounds and ...


7

Wow - you are really motivated :) In general one can say that book 2 is more difficult than the first one. To find an exact order of difficulty would be highly subjective. I would suggest starting with the fugues with the least amount of concurrent voices first which makes life a lot easier. This way you won't be overhelmed by the complexity (it is the way ...


6

Yes, dynamic changes are predominantly achieved by choosing different stops. No, baroque music virtually never specifies which precise stops to pull. The most you can expect is something general such as "Sur les flûtes", or "organo pleno" - and even this doesn't mean what you might think (almost never "all existing stops", usually something more like "stops ...


5

About his development as a composer and the links with his 2 older brothers Johann-Christof and Johann-Jacob. Yes JS was exposed very early to music, music practice and various instruments. He and his brothers were expected to master various instruments and to play ex tempore and generally become proficient in the family's trade, go to other members of the ...


5

It's a baroque trumpet, basically a historical version of a trumpet without valves. Probably they hold it like that because that was the way it was held at that time (think of musicians on a tower, announcing the arrival of the king or stuff like that...)


5

For one thing, J. S. Bach's music for solo keyboard represents only a small fraction of his work as a composer. Bach was primarily a composer of choral and vocal music, and music for chamber orchestra. I would suggest listening to recordings of his choral and vocal music (notably, his cantatas and masses) and his orchestral music to gain a broader ...


4

Ultimately it is subjective, and it is worth learning both the scordatura and normal versions; however, I find the scordatura version more satisfying to play, personally. One place in particular is the G-D-G chord before the start of the fugue. In scordatura, the top G can be played with an open string, so all three pitches can ring simultaneously. In ...


4

Well, my hands aren't particularly big, but I can easily stretch them an octave and perhaps a ninth sometimes. From what I've heard, that's about common. Here, the first interval you mentioned is a tenth (in the twelfth measure). That is larger than what I could reach. However, because they are not sounded at the same time, the D could be hit with the ...


4

Question: Would Beethoven and Chopin sound as good played on guitar? Answer: Probably not. I think this captures what is going on - J.S. Bach wrote his keyboard pieces primarily for the harpsichord. I have heard Bach played on the harpsichord many times and it's absolutely wonderful. Last week I heard a skillful pianist play one Bach's pieces on the ...


4

According to Bach's father's own Explication concerning the trills and ornaments, we are given a guide on how to interpret the trills. The Expliation was later expanded on by C.P.E. Bach. There is no question that an historically correct interpretation will start the trill on the upper auxiliary note (in this case the A). The ornament does not descent to an ...


3

The interpreter seems to be Yasuo Sugiyama, as pointed out in the text of this youtube video: A search for Yasuo Sugiyama on Spotify leads to BWV565 as first result, the album's name ...


3

Views from a native German speaker, just having looked at a text booklet: the vocabulary used in the cantatas is slighty dusted, but still easily recognisable. A few words are dated and some have strange umlauts, where the modern counterparts have none. I guess in the church context one would notice fewer substantial changes. Without knowing which solists ...


3

I once asked this of my piano teacher. The response I got first suggested obtaining a good edition with all the ornamentation properly explained (and printed above the relevant parts rather than right in it so that you may learn it first without). She personally recommended the Alfred edition edited by Willard Palmer. Next, you will likely do best to ...


3

Much of Bach's education in composition came from him making hand copies of many musical scores, as music was not mass-printed at the time. Having mastered the Baroque notions of counterpoint and developing motives, combined with his known skill at improvising in the style, why would he seek to give up mastery of a style to be mediocre at a new one? As to ...


3

What a great question! I am currently working my way through the second book, so I have more specific opinions about that. Of those I've learnt from the first book, I found the following to be less tricky: The C major prelude, of course. Curtis is right about the difficulty of the fugue, however. c minor prelude and fugue are a good first pair to learn c# ...


3

Bach received instruction form his older brother, who was a student of Pachelbel. Bach copied a lot of music of other composers: Buxtehude (famously), Couperin, Frescobaldi, Kerl, Froberger, Pachelbel and many others. Regarding the wide range of influences from German (both North and South), Italian and French music, I don't know that it was that unusual. ...


3

I can't find the passage in question, but in general, I play parallel 5ths moving up or down a scale by alternating between 5-2 and 4-1. If you can't reach that stretch, then playing 5-1 and 4-1 is another option (in this case, keep the top line legato, and it will be okay if the bottom line is disconnected a little bit). Either way, it's a little tricky ...


2

If you are an Indian and want to appreciate Bach's works, an Indian composer called Ilaiyaraja has drawn a parallel between Preludium in E by Bach and a carnatic raga in his composition "I met Bach in my house" from the album How to Name It. This should give you a new direction to think and understand them from your cultural background.


2

For some reason, Bach is better appreciated by learned musicians. Talking to any well-trained musician who plays a lot of Bach, you will realize that it is fully possible to make an emotional connection with the music. In fact, I would argue that Bach alone has written the very most inspirational music, ever. Here's why: Bach was a genius. As Widor ...


2

There are fairly good translation websites out there, for example http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/IndexTexts-Eng3-BWV.htm I'm native in both languages and it's actually a bit easier for me to read the English translation than the original German. It's dated and very "church-centric", i.e. uses phrasings and terms that are solely used in religious ...


1

Some observations: Poetry written for use in church hymns has a rather restricted subject matter and vocabulary to begin with. And in any language, the difference between rhyming poetry and regular speech is always quite different. German has changed quite a bit since Bach's time. In particular, German vocabulary, though not the grammar, has changed ...


1

Presumably, the differences between modern German and the language used in Bach's Cantatas, when considering its usefulness as a tool for learning the language, is less significant than the rather specific nature of their subject matter. As much of the cantatas are based upon liturgical texts, using them as an aid to learning German, would be like learning ...


1

I've heard this played two different ways: Option 1: Option 2: I believe the first one may be more technically correct, but you'd have to ask a baroque specialist. There may be other options as well, but these should be fairly in-line with the original style.


1

I'm looking at the imslp.org's photocopy of an original score, so I hope I got the right spot (no images allowed thru corporate proxywall :-( ). My guess is to start with the upper note of the trill as a sort of grace-note just prior to hitting the triad; then release the full triad prior to the final sixteenth. At least, that's how I'd approach a similar ...


1

They look very much like the second ornament on the bottom line of the guide (idem), and I have heard them played like that. Of course, they look shorter, like a combination of that "uphook" and the mordent. With this interpretation you could also play the first one as B-A#-G#-A#, especially if your tempo is faster. I think I prefer the more finalizing ...


1

I hesitate greatly in answering this (someone already dinged you)... after all everything is a matter of taste and opinion but... perhaps there just isn't enough harmonic tension or dissonance to satisfy your personal taste. I had a teacher once equate dissonance with spicy food... at first it's too hot... but you start to like it after the first couple ...


1

I don't know how old this topic is, but generally speaking, VERY generally, the preludes are easier than the fugues, the easier keys are the ones with the fewer sharps and flats, C,D,F,G. etc. The two voice fugues are easier than the three and four voiced fugues, and as far as tempo goes, though it may be tempting, and everybody does it, don't play at tempo ...


1

I've played the First Book and learned perhaps half of the Second but one thing for certain - the first fugue in C Major isn't easy at all. The fact that something is in C Major with no flats or sharps doesn't mean that it's easy to perform. Chopin's First Etude or Schumann's Toccata are in C Major and are notoriously difficult. To begin, I could suggest ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible