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The origin of the Sarabande is dance associated with Palo Mayombe in Cuba. Sarabande comes from the Bantu word Nsala-Banda which, taken literally, means Begin the Spirit, perhaps a nod to spirit possession associated with the dance, or meaning to get wild. Nsala-Banda or alternatively Zarabanda is the name of the god (mpungu) of iron and war, for whom the ...


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Several of the Alfred Masterwork Editions of Bach's piano music have excellent explanations of many of these matters and even have them notated above each symbol: WTC Book 1


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Supplementing Neil Meyer's correct answer with more information... Kochevitsky (p. 28, requires registration) confirms the slide notation with a "tail," like the one in the sheet music I was originally asking about: However in Kochevitsky's text there is no clear example of a the mordent-with-tail slide notation without a preceding note for it to lead ...


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Looking thru the Dolmetsch online, I found a couple interesting suggestions. First, the Bach-specific set of ornaments, and then the symbol called custos (Latin), Wachte (German), guida (Italian), guidon (French) or 'direct', placed at the end of a line to indicate the pitch of the first note on the next line (from the front page ) . However, as ...


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Since I can't attach an image to a comment: @guidot said in a comment he was "unconvinced" by non-professional engraving here. I agree that in the OP's image the ornament seems to have been "faked" (and rather crudely), but the same ornament appears in the (old, hand-engraved) Bach-Gesellschaft Ausgabe, Band 25: http://ks.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/6/...


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Bachs autograph here in wikipedia shows something similar: the round tail (first line, last two bars) appears on the left side and indicates a three-note-group followed by the zig-zag line symbolizing the alteration between two notes, and the direction of the tail indicates, whether the notes descend or ascend. I would conclude, that in your example the ...


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When the Mordent sign is used in front of the note it actually indicates a slide. If you can excuse the poor photo of the source material I think it can still be of some worth to you. It says the following... THE SLIDE. This is written as a Mordent sign before a note, and consists of the two notes below the principal note taken consecutively, and leading ...



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