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3

Having played both piano and harpsichord, let me throw another idea out there on top of all the excellent academic sources people have quoted: In harpsichord it does not matter how hard or soft you hit the key (since it plucks rather than hits the string). Good technique is, thus, centered around control of the "touch", and typically the goal is to keep ...


3

If you’re like most pianists, your ability to memorize music is probably fine, but your ability to recall what you’ve memorized is affected by new and stressful surroundings, such as unfamiliar feel and sound of an unfamiliar instrument, unfamiliar acoustics, peer pressure, heightened fear of making a mistake in public, or any number of things that are ...


0

drink Ginko Biloba. Play before you sleep. Play when you wake. the sleep gap cements it all as your brain defragments it all when you sleep.This goes for all memorising things generally.


4

For me, the most reliable form of memory seems to be a mental aural replay of the piece. Achieving a simple form of this is no harder than listening to a song on the radio a few times and then not being able to get it out of your head. To go from here to something that is reliable in performance takes more. For one, there are more details to remember ...


5

Playing something 'by heart' and 'muscle memory' to me seem to be intertwined. With something physical, such as playing a piece, they cannot be separated. Repetition (funnily enough, the French for rehearsal) will produce the muscle memory, and simultaneously, make the brain remember. For me, a person 'knows' something when it's possible to do something ...



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