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1

I agree with luser droog's answer. My understanding of the book (which I did not finish) was that there is an overall theme of language, which is then illustrated through the three artists. While the letters in each of these languages are based on natural, measurable, physical phenomena (projections to 2 dimensions in the visual language of Escher, ...


3

As someone who has no formal training in music whatsoever but who fell in love with Beethoven and Bach upon hearing them, I discovered that my visual senses are much better at picking out patterns than my auditory senses. Here is a rendition of Bach's great fugue BWV 542 which shows it all to you while sacrificing none of the auditory pleasures derived from ...


1

Using sheet music is a great idea, but, in this modern computer age, you can go one better and use digital sheet music. I don't just mean a PDF or any similar format that is essentially just computerized scan of the original paper, but actual digital files designed for sheet music programs. While the music will not sound as good as if played by actual ...


2

I agree with Kevin's answer. You need to understand music to understand those concepts. I also read GEB last year but at that time I couldn't understand it. But now I have learnt how to read music, what are scales and keys, etc. This time I was able to understand it more properly. You should visit this website: http://www.musictheory.net/lessons .


4

A key to following the polyphonic music of Bach is to be able to single out the individual voices. You will be very much helped by having a score at hand. In a fugue, the theme is presented in one voice, then repeated on the dominant with slightly modified intervals (but same rhythm and pitch profile) in another voice, then introduced in the tonic in a third ...


3

The easiest way to understand the concepts in GEB is to understand basic music reading. Look at the notes only as letters for music. A good intro to reading music reading can be found in this link: "The Basics of Reading Music" by Kevin Meixner


8

Tough question about an amazing book. "Hearing" the fact that that particular canon continues rising in key is more difficult, and I think it's more interesting just to know that fact. Hearing the sort of patterns Hofstadter discusses is far more important to your enjoyment of the book. I would get a recording of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, and listen ...


5

Very interesting !! Just listened to the opening bars, and it's in C#minor. That's probably why it sounds like a C#, not a D. Now whether the recording has been slowed down a smidgen is conjecture, or whether the cello is actually tuned differently I don't know. So, yes it sounds like C# 'cos it is. Couldn't find one in 'Dm'.Unless, of course, the tuning was ...



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