Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Cm7 as V7 : instead of third C7 = "E" appoggiatura b10 = "Eb" who does or doesn't resolve over appoggiatura 9 ("D") to the 1st of the V7 ("C"of chord C) or to the 5th of I ("C"of chord F) . C [b10 9 7 omit 3]


1

You have two things going on here. In general, it's given the chord Fm7 because that's the general quality of the A section. You can tell by the bass line, which is 1 5 7 8 — three out of four of the notes of the Fm7 (lacking only the third, which is given to you by the right hand). That said, the scale is an F dorian scale, so it's OK to have those ...


2

I wouldn't say that this is exactly in Fm7. Fm7 could be played on top of the melody, and it would sound good. Here's why: (1st beat) First chord is clearly Fm: F, Ab, C. (2nd and 3rd beat) Bb and D are passing notes that go to C and Eb respectively. The bass is C and the chord could be Cm (no5), that sounds good over the F minor chord, because it's like ...


1

The way I see it is this: the root is definitely F. What is happening on top is a standard F dorian pattern. The basic seventh chord in F dorian is Fm7, so in a lead sheet when you want to write down a simple harmony, the best choice is Fm7. You're of course right that this chord is implicit, but out of all basic seventh chords with root F, the only one that ...


3

How then can we say that this is an Fm7? That's just our best evaluation of the situation. This is the not-so-secret truth behind music theory: it does not absolutely dictate or categorize music in all cases. It's just a guide and framework to help us communicate about musical ideas, but many musical ideas defy the conventions of music theory, and in ...


1

Following on from Shev's really good answer, other facets are to be able to play each song at different tempos, and in different keys. Often jazz players 'mess around' with standards, and use different tempos, and sometimes time sigs change, just for fun - or a challenge. Keys will change for songs as they become dependent on the vocalist. "I know xyz is in ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...


2

I never took classical piano lessons, but it does help to a degree. It helps with sight reading, should you ever decide to sit in a session and everyone are reading charts arranged for originals, etc. It helps with basic chords. Mostly Major and minor triads in different inversions, with different bass notes from the same chord. (typical feature in classical ...


7

As you know, the II V I progression is the most important progression in jazz. Since there is a very strong root motion of a descending perfect fifth, not only between V and I, but also between II and V, this II-V-progression has become an independent unit, which is frequently used without the need to resolve to the related I chord. It is important to ...


1

As a cadence, it's called imperfect - the opposite of perfect, it doesn't quite arrive back at home like most of us expect. In Satin doll, instead, it goes to other ii-Vs which further confound the listener who feels a modulation to another key. It does actually land at the end of the sequence on bar 7. The middle section then moves to subdom F, then ...


0

Basically it's how to pedal with pianos. Jazz tends to change chords more often than other genres of music. So in order to stop the music sounding muddy, pedaling properly is paramount. As the underlying chord is changed, the pedal needs to be lifted and after the next chord is played, the pedal is employed again.


1

The chromatic scale is made of 12 semitones. When you consider this in a non tonal way, there are several ways to evenly split these 12 semitones: 12 semitones, the chomatic scale 6 tones e.g. C D E F# G# A#, the tone scales 4 minor thirds e.g. C Eb Gb A, the diminished chord 3 major thirds, e.g. C E G#, the augmented chord. These divisions are related ...


4

Generally, it's good to practice everything everywhere. This helps you get to know the instrument you're playing better (this doesn't apply only to guitar) and helps you learn how to transpose the songs. But, if you still cannot play a song in a certain key, there isn't much point in transposing it. It might help if you transposed it into something that had ...


2

This is what I have been taught in High school and university: Theoretically, you can say that G11 is the chord with the notes G, B, D, F, A and C. But in practice, the third (in this case B) should be omitted, because of the dissonance! The 5th (the note D in G11) may be omitted, but not necessarily. So in practice G11 is the same as G9sus4. This is also ...


1

To me it just seems to be saying you take the chord/scale, whatever that happens to be, and any triads you can build from that chord/scale can be used in place of the 7th chord built from its tonic. What type of chords those will be will just depend on the chord/scale. It's really just seems to be a heuristic for voicing the chord/scale.


2

Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...


1

Improvisations is at its core completion of a melody. That questions you do in your theory exams is there for a reason. If you can get some training in the writing of melodies and take that training into your playing then you will have the basics down to such an extent where you can improvise to any given music.


3

This is a very broad question, and each individual subquestion is very broad by itself, but I'll try to point you in the right direction. You should grab a copy of either Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" or Robert Rawlins' "Jazzology". In my experience, those are the most recommended general jazz theory books. Check reviews in Amazon and similar sites ...


3

Yeah, Frank Gambale! I listened to the first vid and was like, "wow, this guy would love Gambale..." lol. So, getting more specific and answering your (admittedly) very broad question: Harmony/Changes These guys are playing with the changes. That's because this isn't really pure "funk"(), it's fusion, which is really jazz with a rock beat (IMHO, don't ...



Top 50 recent answers are included