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To answer the question of what an F blues is, it is a 12 bar form largely based on dominant 7 chords. F would be: one bar of F7, 1x Bb7, 2x F7. 2x Bb7, 2x F7, 1x Gm7, 1x C7, 1x F7, 1x C7. That is a basic form of the Jazz blues. There are many, many ways to augment that progression including substituting some of the chord for dominant 7s that lead up to the ...


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So an F blues refers to the song form over which you'll need to improvise. The good news is, if you know how to improvise on a blues scale, your work is largely done for you. There are infinite ways to improvise over a blues form, but one of the simplest ways that's also very effective is to use the blues scale. So in this case you would use the F minor ...


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In this case, the diminished chord is kind of special, in that it works as a passing chord to harmonize all non-chord tones. What I mean by this, and what I think is sort of implied by your question, is that in taking a scale (C major for example), if you harmonize all the notes in this scale, with locked-hands, block-chords style, for the notes C, E, G and ...


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The gypsy right hand technique revolves mostly around the so-called 'rest stroke'. The wrist is bent naturally, the upper arm rests on the top of the guitar. Every time a different string is hit, it's always a down stroke. The down stroke will rest on the string above it, hence, the 'rest stroke'. Down strokes are predominant. The action originates from ...


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What Fergus said is true if you start a diminished arpegio from any chord tone but the root. Lets say you are playing over A7 (A C# E G) If you start a diminished chord over the 3th, C# you get C# E G A# over the 5th, E you get E G A# C# over the 7th, G you get G A# C# E All the above had the same chord tones as a rootless A7 b9 But if you start a ...


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In "locked hands" style, you can often take a pragmatic voice-leading approach to passing chords. Move what has to move, let what can stay put do so. No need to worry too much about analyzing the result.


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It sounds to me like you are referring to the passing 6/4 chord progression of I(6)-vii(6)-I. Which is very common passing chord. (especially in four part harmony exercises.)


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OK. In fact this questions is not one but many, depending on the (theory knlowledge) level of the person asking. To understand how to use a passing chord, one must first understand what is NOT a passing chord. In jazz, a passing chord is something different from the iim7-V7-IM7 (in major), or the minor equivalent of iim7b5 -V7alt-ImM7 (Im6) AND THAT IS ...


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Yes. That book, while being very good, is not paced well for beginners. It throws a ton of hard-to-learn stuff at you right away. I'd recommend supplementing it with other books that perhaps have more written out examples to work with as well. I wouldn't say it's good as an only book. The thing about learning is jazz is that I could sit down with a new ...


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I believe this is exactly what BBNG makes use of in their song CS60 on the first chord when the melody comes in. It sounds to me like an Ab major7 (b9) than then resolves down to the root, G minor and continues to Eb and then basically D minor (the diatonic VI and v respectively). The melody notes go from b9 to major 7 and it works really well in giving it ...


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It should be mentioned that throughout the whole book there are three occurrences of the statement that triads sound stronger/strongest in second inversion: Ex. 1 Ex. 2 Ex. 3 If you look at the context in each of these cases you'll see that Levine always talks about slash chords. In Ex. 1 he talks about a Gsus4 (actually G9sus4) voiced as a F/G chord, ...


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In general, when we say 2nd inversion we mean that the 5th of the chord is in the bass. However, the author is treating these slash chords as independent major chords superimposed over a C bass note. These particular chords are the ones in 2nd inversion regardless of the C note in the bass. Moreover, in "close chord position" or "keyboard style" such as in ...


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When Levine refers to a chord as being "stronger" is can also be read as "more stable", as in harmonically stable. Take the C Major Triad as an example (C, E, G). If you analyze what the intervals are for each inversion (first and second) you can see the following: First inversion; E is root under G and C E,G = m3 E,C = m6 G,C = P4 Second inversion; G is ...


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A minor 2nd interval (two notes that are one half-step apart) is used in the chord. Minor 2nds generally sound dissonant and not very good. On a piano, try playing B and C or F and F# together. The major seventh chord doesn't sound quite as dissonant as this because the B and C are in different octaves, but it's definitely not as pleasing as a regular ...



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