New answers tagged

3

My response might be more abstract than what you are looking for, but I think it's ultimately a healthier mentality. I've included a more concrete example of its implementation at the end. In my opinion, approaching music with a 'lick'-based mentality tends to limit your ability to be open and interactive with yourself and the ensemble/band. I find if more ...


5

I don't entirely agree with the other answers I see here. From my experience, as well as looking at quantization values offered in DAWs, a swing feel can be varied, sometimes based on genre but other times based on the style of the players and/or composer. The concept of swinging is that the note value that is swung, in your example the 1/8 note, is pushed ...


1

The following anecdote (heard from an international virtuoso classical pianist a long time ago, but unfortunately I don't remember who said it - possibly Barenboim) answers the question pretty well. As a young student, he was learning Beethoven's first piano sonata, and asked his teacher (also a famous pianist) what he needed to do to play it better. The ...


1

I wonder, did you mean the dot to be AFTER the third quaver (eighth note), rather than as a staccato mark? If so, the two are different. In the first example, the single beat is split into 3 equal parts, and in the second, the dotted quaver is three times as long as the last quaver, assuming the last quaver is actually a semiquaver (16th note), otherwise it ...


2

If the song is swing or jazz, then most likely yes. Some sheet music will have a marking at the beginning of the song, which will read "Swing Feel" or "eighths (quavers) should be played as triplets" (Like in your example).But most sheet music won't have these markings, it is implied though, since most swing and jazz music are played using this swing feel. ...


1

I divide up my music into two categories -- assignment and performance. The assignment pieces are to help me to increase my skills, and once I get to 80-90% proficient, I feel that I have gotten what I need from it. I will see the same patterns in future music, so I don't waste time on polishing my assignment pieces. Performance pieces is a different ...


0

This should be a comment to Phil Freuhofner's rather good answer, but it's to long for a comment, sorry for that. First a clarification, properly a "raga" is not a style or genre, it is the collection of notes selected to execute a piece in Indian Classical Music (as some sources prefer to call it, or Carnatic Music, if referring expressly to the more pure ...


1

The "obvious" fingering would be 2 | 1 2 3 4 - 5 3 4 5 4 | 3 1 If you don't like that, you could try starting with your thumb. Then play another note with your thumb under your fingers, so you don't run out of fingers before your get to the top note - i.e. 1 | 2 3 1 4 - 5 3 4 5 4 | 3 1 or 1 | 2 1 3 4 - 5 3 4 5 4 | 3 1 or you might prefer 1 | 2 3 1 3 ...


0

Apart from the anacrucis D, the first phrase ranges between G and the upper D. All that can be played with thumb on G, up to pinky on D. The easiest seems to be to play the first D and move the whole hand sideways to the new position.


0

Start with your thumb on the D and then move it up to G and play the rest in that position. It might take a bit of work to transition cleanly, but that is the easiest way.


7

For much of Jazz, the harmonic changes provide a key forward push. Melodic choices have to work within that framework. In Indian music, there are no harmonic changes to exploit for forward motion or melodic development. With some "smooth jazz" and some modal jazz, the tunes stay in a single key or mode, and there is more similarity to Indian music, but even ...


0

Your teachers are not trying to catch you out, they are not trying to make you fail. They're trying to help you develop as a jazz player. In the jazz band you play trombone. So play trombone. This is about musical ideas, not about technique really, isn't it?


0

Yup, check free courses in the MOOC platforms, for example: Coursera Jazz Improvistation The Blues: Understanding and Performing an American Art Form eDx Jazz: The Music, The Stories, The Players Jazz Appreciation


0

one of the very early considerations that led to many clubs getting their own, or an act carrying its own, was the fact that they did not require tuning, could not get out of tune. No surprises at the next gig.


1

It's a matter of voicing: many chord changes happen by just changing few notes slightly. If there is a dedicated bass note keeping track of the respective root, it tends to jump around a lot, not maintaining a melodic line of its own. Omitting such a bass line makes the resulting changes more subtle and work on their own, like reciting a poem without ...


1

Depending on how much the audience is used to the type of music being played, it can "hear" the root although it's not there. As if the player was saying "I don't play the root D there, but you know what I mean". The context helps pretending the root was there. A bit like when someone is playing a very minimalistic version of a standard tune, if the ...


1

There are a number of cases where it's possible to think of chords from different perspectives. One example would be the way that a C major 6th chord and an A minor 7th chord have the same notes in, but in different contexts it might make more sense to think of the chord as one or the other. Another example would be when modulating, say using a common chord ...


4

First thing which comes to my mind is that you get a (rootless) D-9 when you play FM7, so you add color to your chord (the 9th). And if you play the root in the melody, you don't "lose" a voice by doubling a note. The second thing is that playing the rootless chords, especially when playing standards, change the feeling of the chord progression: playing ...


0

When transcribing, it's easier to understand WHAT'S happening, after a muso has actually produced something. When looking at the theory behind it, this will explain WHY and HOW it works. As said previously, you need both to make your playing a success. Merely doing the first, you will be able to play copycat phrases all day long, without actually knowing ...


4

Consider an analogy with literature. You can become an author by reading good books, or by studying language and grammar. In reality, you will want some of both. Each is valuable, but in different ways. The latter provides understanding and insight into the first. Music theory is sort of the grammar behind music, and the extent to which it helps you will ...


1

The two go hand in hand. As you transcribe, you'll see that certain patterns apply (like the ii V I turn-around). IMO, you don't need as much theory as you think... I was focused on learning modes and chord substitution but have gotten much more from transcribing and practicing the language. But like you said, transcribing is more important.. you can ...



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