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one of the very early considerations that led to many clubs getting their own, or an act carrying its own, was the fact that they did not require tuning, could not get out of tune. No surprises at the next gig.


1

It's a matter of voicing: many chord changes happen by just changing few notes slightly. If there is a dedicated bass note keeping track of the respective root, it tends to jump around a lot, not maintaining a melodic line of its own. Omitting such a bass line makes the resulting changes more subtle and work on their own, like reciting a poem without ...


1

Depending on how much the audience is used to the type of music being played, it can "hear" the root although it's not there. As if the player was saying "I don't play the root D there, but you know what I mean". The context helps pretending the root was there. A bit like when someone is playing a very minimalistic version of a standard tune, if the ...


1

There are a number of cases where it's possible to think of chords from different perspectives. One example would be the way that a C major 6th chord and an A minor 7th chord have the same notes in, but in different contexts it might make more sense to think of the chord as one or the other. Another example would be when modulating, say using a common chord ...


4

First thing which comes to my mind is that you get a (rootless) D-9 when you play FM7, so you add color to your chord (the 9th). And if you play the root in the melody, you don't "lose" a voice by doubling a note. The second thing is that playing the rootless chords, especially when playing standards, change the feeling of the chord progression: playing ...


0

When transcribing, it's easier to understand WHAT'S happening, after a muso has actually produced something. When looking at the theory behind it, this will explain WHY and HOW it works. As said previously, you need both to make your playing a success. Merely doing the first, you will be able to play copycat phrases all day long, without actually knowing ...


4

Consider an analogy with literature. You can become an author by reading good books, or by studying language and grammar. In reality, you will want some of both. Each is valuable, but in different ways. The latter provides understanding and insight into the first. Music theory is sort of the grammar behind music, and the extent to which it helps you will ...


1

The two go hand in hand. As you transcribe, you'll see that certain patterns apply (like the ii V I turn-around). IMO, you don't need as much theory as you think... I was focused on learning modes and chord substitution but have gotten much more from transcribing and practicing the language. But like you said, transcribing is more important.. you can ...


1

Raising pickup will make it sound more characteristic for position. So neck position will become more fat and bridge will have more treble. Lowering should do opposite. Set best for you.


1

Ragtime can be considered as one of the precursors to boogie woogie. Ragtime itself came initially from rearranging marches by the likes of Sousa (considered part of the classical tradition) for piano whilst adding in polyrhythms. The rhythmic changes are in some part down to the limitations of piano orchestration as opposed to marching band orchestration ...


4

I don't know how much the boogie players were classically trained on average, but to answer the question "Is there anything in the pre-20th century classical canon that resembles the boogie-woogie bass line" the Alberti Bass, as pointed out by Laurance Payne, sure comes to mind. But I would add a number of pieces by Bach. Take for example the second prelude ...


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Beethoven got close in the final movement of his last piano sonata (the relevant part is from 0:30 to the end of the video)


3

I suppose you could draw a comparison with the Alberti Bass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass


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According to the Wikipedia article on accordion music genres, many popular bands of the 1910s and 1920s employed an accordion player, including the Paul Whiteman Orchestra and the Horace Heidt Orchestra (though I'd not heard of the latter before reading the above article). So it looks like the answer to my question is that accordions were used in ...


0

Average "accordion patches" try to capture the look&feel of a "typical" accordion. Which lean a bit towards the awful side. The accordion is really a portable harmonium with much more delicate pressure control (which is one reason harmoniums went out of fashion and accordions not). An "accordion patch" does not offer this minute continuous control, ...


0

The explanations I could think of: The composer could have decided that the piano part can be played by an accordion as well to give it a different timbre (Experimenting with the instrument setup) The charts are sort of universally written so accordion players can participate as well. This way it's the arranger's choice to include an accordion. And ...


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Head is intro + AABBAABB "kicks do not hold for solos" means don't play the figures above the staff in the B section during the solos.


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It's a really round about way of notating a G7sus4. The + is telling you to raise the note and the 3 is referring to the third of the chord so it's telling you to raise the 3rd. Since a raised major 3rd is just a 4th you'll typically see this chord as just G7sus4 which tells you to play a G7 with a 4th instead of a 3rd. If you even search the chord symbol ...



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