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In short, I would recommend increased exposure, learning to play specific songs by ear, and having a reference book. There are always a few different ways to go about learning a new style. One of the more important things is to listen to that style as much as possible. This will ingrain the feel of the style. You can learn a lot of theory from books but ...


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As everyone here has already said, the fundamentals are fundamentals. Whether you choose jazz, pop, or hip hop, if you really want to be a better musician and understand music as a language, you must know the fundamentals. "What are the fundamentals?" Well, the Theory 1 class of Hunter music school defines the fundamentals as the following in their ...


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To understand the theories that are used in jazz, it helps a LOT to first understand the basics, which are contained in what is known as classical theory. In order to appreciate altered chords and scales, it's easier when the original ones are known - the alterations start to make sense then! So start with basics, then branch out once they are known.


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I would probably just be the contrarian here but I do not think there really is such a thing as 'Jazz Theory' as much as there is 'Baroque Theory' or 'Romantic Theory' A proper understanding of the core principles of music theory and history opens the door up to any style you may want to pursue.


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Basic classical theory is fairly easy to get into and uses almost the same exact building block that jazz theory uses. Most jazz theory classes someone would take require a basic music theory class as a prerequisite. There are many sources to get you started in classical theory including MusicTheory.net's lessons which if you can learn and understand them ...


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Let me give an answer that is from a broader perspective (and supports Tim's response). All western music that you hear, whether it is techno, jazz, or hip hop, is based off of "classical theory" (a.k.a western harmony). Therefore, you will need to know the classical theory fundamentals. However, those fundamentals will naturally be taught first before ...


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As for the sound of the F#dim chord, I would guess that the reason it doesn't sound compatible is that F# is the one note where A Dorian differs from vanilla A Minor. It's not in our "normal" musical system to have only a raised 6th in a minor key, so having a diminished chord build on that note is out of our common experience. My assumption is that this is ...


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For your first solos I suggest you write it down, practice like hell, and play that. If you want to learn improvisation on the trombone, listen and transcribe j.j.Johnson, and Curtis fuller, you will learn all the tricks


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You are asking, (1) which instrument will you use, and (2) what advice can we give you for getting started with soloing, which you find rather daunting at this point. You can buy a book and play along CD. Once you've learned a tune well, you're reading to try improvising with both instruments while listening to the play-along track. Hopefully this will ...


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To answer the question of what an F blues is, it is a 12 bar form largely based on dominant 7 chords. F would be: one bar of F7, 1x Bb7, 2x F7. 2x Bb7, 2x F7, 1x Gm7, 1x C7, 1x F7, 1x C7. That is a basic form of the Jazz blues. There are many, many ways to augment that progression including substituting some of the chord for dominant 7s that lead up to the ...


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So an F blues refers to the song form over which you'll need to improvise. The good news is, if you know how to improvise on a blues scale, your work is largely done for you. There are infinite ways to improvise over a blues form, but one of the simplest ways that's also very effective is to use the blues scale. So in this case you would use the F minor ...


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In this case, the diminished chord is kind of special, in that it works as a passing chord to harmonize all non-chord tones. What I mean by this, and what I think is sort of implied by your question, is that in taking a scale (C major for example), if you harmonize all the notes in this scale, with locked-hands, block-chords style, for the notes C, E, G and ...



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