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1

I'm not entirely familiar with that term but I believe I can provide some insight. There appear to be two things happening in your example. The first is the idea of arpeggio superimposing and the second being an alteration to the G7 chord. If I'm properly understanding what I briefly looked up just now, arpeggio superimposing is basically playing an ...


6

There's a huge difference between the two. A tonal center is the note your harmony and melody will sound at home at while guide tones are the notes that not only greatly define the harmony at that point, but typically help lead from the last chord to the next chord. Think of it this way. In a typical ii7 - V7 - I7 in C major, C is the tonal center ...


3

Take a II, V, I progression in the key of C. Here's two ways to approach it. Over the II chord, play dorian, over the V play mixolydian, over the I play Ionian. I personally don't like thinking this way. I prefer the second way, to think "key of C" and listen to the unique sound of each chord and define those chordal notes. This may be what these ...


2

Jimmy Bruno is an extremely competent and technical guitar player who would definitely know all about modes from a performance viewpoint. If you could provide the quote I could give you a better answer but here's what I think he's talking about. Players like Carol Kaye and Joe Pass form solos from chord notes with connecting notes. There are a couple of ...


1

Thelonious Monk played many pieces at an easy pace. Your challenge with him will be figuring out his chords. Bud Powell also plays at a moderate pace and uses simple chord voicings. But if it's simple speed that's an issue for you then try Software that slows down music to help in transcribing


1

Wynton Kelly played a fairly simple, blues-influenced style. His solo on "Freddie the Freeloader" is a good first solo to learn.


3

There are loads of different ways to do this. A simple one is 1-3 on 1st chord, leading often to a IV chord, so 1-3 on that. if the sequence is I to V, then play 1- lower 6, then 1-3 on the V. If the second chord has a note in it which is a semitone away from one of the first chord notes, then make them the 2nd and 3rd beat notes. Using a passing note on ...


1

Adding to Dom's answer, C#4 SHOULD include C#, E#, G# and F#. Whereas C#sus 4 will only contain C#, F# and G#. That's because the suspension of the 3rd, replaced by the 4th, is why it's a sus. chord. If the composer wants the triad AND the 4th note, it's C#4. As in other answers, by the time we get to numbers larger than 7, we generally inlclude that 7, and ...


2

In Jazz, they usually think the chords in thirds. This means that they will take the root and ascend thirds to find the other notes: C# (1), E# (maj 3), G# (5), B (b7), D# (9 or D b9), F# (11 -or Fx #11), A# (13). So, if you have a C#7 chord and want to play F#, you would mark it as C# 11 and not C# 4. Like Dom said, this chord will also have D# in it. If ...


4

It's actually a very big difference. C♯11 is easily seen as an a extended chord that contains the notes C♯, E♯, G♯, B, (D♯), and F♯ though typically the 3rd (E♯) is omitted due to the clash with the 11th (F♯). C#4 is ambiguous, but most people looking at it would imply it is a C♯sus4 chord spelled C&...



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