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To play jazz, you need to understand chords (harmony), which major and minor keys these are derived from, and how to voice these chords on your instrument. You need to understand the theory. This is the only thing you need at gigs. People generally don't take sheet music to gigs, they take lead sheets which just give you the chords and melody (so if you ...


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If you're playing this style, I would suggest that instead of looking for a list of Freddie Green chords, you should procedurally construct all drop 2 chords using string set 6543. Freddie Green chords are merely drop2 chords on strings 6543, but with the note on string 5 always omitted to leave a little bit of space for the rest of the ensemble. (Straw ...


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Bill Frisell's technique differs from mainstream jazz in that it is entirely dependent on the melody, not the chord structure. Interviewer: Your approach to melody seems unique in that you break it down piece by piece until you are dissecting the elements of sound within the context of melody. Can you explain that process? Frisell: When I first ...


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M-Base is: Macro - Basic Array of Structured Extemporizations which means... Building a common creative musical language on the collective level (macro, basic, array). A way of thinking of music as growth through creativity, not a musical style to be set in stone. Emphasizes conceptual growth as opposed to technical growth. "...A non-western conception of ...


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Debussy surely influenced the piano playing of trumpeter Bix Beiderbecke. It is also said that the bebop harmony has been inspired by Western Music; from people like Debussy and Schoenberg. Kubik, Gerhard. "Bebop: a case in point. The African Matrix in Jazz Harmonic Practices." (Critical essay) Black Music Research Journal 22 Mar 2005. Digital.: While ...


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Here are a few generalizations: Traditional Jazz education: follow the chord tones and tensions. Jerry Bergonzi method: Beginnings of improvisation are mostly in major or minor tetra chords. Bebop: follow the chord tones but precede them with chromatics or double chromatic approaches, being sure to put the chromatics on a weak beat such as an upbeat. ...


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I disagree with the previous posters in that I think there are several good arguments with opposite conclusions. One way to look at it is that the name of a note should depend on how it is written. In this example, a Db is b5 (or b12) and a C# is #11, period. This is the standard practice in the world of classical theory. Another way to look at it (which ...


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I would say that your answer is actually correct and the book is wrong in this case, and let me tell you why. It seems likely that this is a very modern book and that if they would say it is a #11, they wouldn't penalize you for writing the technical correct b5. Chords are based on scales. In a typical 7 note scale scale, you will write the intervals as so: ...


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If it's a #11 then it must be written as such. As a b12 it doesn't make sense, so the dots cannot be accurate.Otherwise we have anarchy. (Again).If you can make anything of this exercise, then maybe you're past this level!!


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Bill Evans was the king of sparse playing in a trio context. Five Ways to Play like Bill Evans Left-Hand Rootless Voicings: His four-note, rootless chord voicings consist of guide tones (thirds and sevenths), along with chord tones, color tones, extensions, and/or alterations. These compact voicings also have inherently smooth voice leading. Right-Hand ...


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Without knowing exactly at which level you are I can only offer you generic solutions: For a start you could use chord substitutions. Just in case you are unaware of these, see here a nice explanation with examples (for guitar though). If you are not doing it already, you should detach both hands and play chords and rhythm with one hand (traditionally the ...



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