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3

The verse is just plain E minor. I understand your initial confusion, but you have to remember that you can bring things in from outside the key without changing the key. In this the harmony is simply built on and utilizes the different scales used for minor which are the natural, harmonic, and melodic minor. If you were to naturally build 7th chords off ...


8

This is an Ab major 7 flat 5 (Abmaj7(b5)) chord (if you hear Ab as its root). Many people would call it an Abmaj7(#11), because the b5 and the #11 are enharmonically the same note, and if you have a #11 you almost never have the perfect fifth in the chord anyway. I often use this voicing (from low to high): Ab G C D In the key of Bb major, this chord can ...


0

Basically, what you're asking is how to play a solo on an instrument that you are technically not very skilled at (yet) and still make it work. What you need to do is Play fewer notes. Longer notes and more space between them (e.g. play 3 notes in 2 bars, then rest for 1 bar, etc.) Keep it simple. Choose 1 or 2 notes on each chord which you want to hear ...


0

The answer to whether to play your solo on trombone or euphonium is one of personal choice. If you want to develop your improvisation skills, trombone might be the better choice since it is a much more common instrument in jazz. You probably won't get invited to many big bands as exclusively a euphonium player. Regarding the question of how to improve your ...


1

I believe that SpiderShlong is confusing a guide tone line with a walking bass line. The typical guide tone line starts at the 3rd of a chord and ends on the 7th which is usually a half step away from the next chord's third. In a walking bass line, you start on the root and end with a note to approach the next root, either chromatic, diatonic or a fifth away ...


1

I believe that the best definition of the concept avoid note is the following: Avoid notes: The pitch or pitches of a chord scale which are not used harmonically because they will destabilize the sound of the chord. (from The Chord Scale Theory and Jazz Harmony by Barrie Nettles and Richard Graf) This definition avoids the problems inherent in the ...


5

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


1

You have two things going on here. In general, it's given the chord Fm7 because that's the general quality of the A section. You can tell by the bass line, which is 1 5 7 8 — three out of four of the notes of the Fm7 (lacking only the third, which is given to you by the right hand). That said, the scale is an F dorian scale, so it's OK to have those ...


2

I wouldn't say that this is exactly in Fm7. Fm7 could be played on top of the melody, and it would sound good. Here's why: (1st beat) First chord is clearly Fm: F, Ab, C. (2nd and 3rd beat) Bb and D are passing notes that go to C and Eb respectively. The bass is C and the chord could be Cm (no5), that sounds good over the F minor chord, because it's like ...


1

The way I see it is this: the root is definitely F. What is happening on top is a standard F dorian pattern. The basic seventh chord in F dorian is Fm7, so in a lead sheet when you want to write down a simple harmony, the best choice is Fm7. You're of course right that this chord is implicit, but out of all basic seventh chords with root F, the only one that ...


3

How then can we say that this is an Fm7? That's just our best evaluation of the situation. This is the not-so-secret truth behind music theory: it does not absolutely dictate or categorize music in all cases. It's just a guide and framework to help us communicate about musical ideas, but many musical ideas defy the conventions of music theory, and in ...


1

Following on from Shev's really good answer, other facets are to be able to play each song at different tempos, and in different keys. Often jazz players 'mess around' with standards, and use different tempos, and sometimes time sigs change, just for fun - or a challenge. Keys will change for songs as they become dependent on the vocalist. "I know xyz is in ...


4

What I think you should be able to do is: Play the melody fluently; if you can learn it by heart, even better, but if not don't worry. Play the melody slightly varied. If you listen to the same jazz song by many artists, you'll see that none of them play it the same. Everyone changes it a bit here and there. That's something you'll have to do yourself. ...



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