Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

When you write that you've studied loads of scales and arpeggios but "I don't have many jazz heroes to borrow those licks from," it sounds to me like you are facing an obstacle faced by many young musicians today: with all the instructional material and fake books around, it is too easy to think you are learning the music without actually listening to the ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


7

Knowing what modes/scales to use over a chord can be approached a number of ways. Here's an over simplified way to know what scale you can use over a certain chord (DISCLAIMER: THIS IS OVERSIMPLIFIED): Is it Major? (R 3 5 7) Is the fourth sharped? (Yes - you might try Lydian) Otherwise, use Ionian or all of the above Is it Minor? (R b3 5 b7) Is the ...


0

G#dim7 is a rootless inversion for G7b9, making it a nice substitution for this type of chord. The b9 is an altered tension that goes well before a minor chord (look for the altered dominants in a minor 2-5-1). The G#dim7 kind of acts as a G7, which itself is a tritone substitution for a C#7. C#7 is the V7/II - secondary dominant for the II chord, F#m7 - ...


1

In my opinion, finding a scale fitting in a chord is a nice solution for jazz improvisation. Any scale or modes which does not conflict with the chord is a good option, even if you can not name the scale. The scale you see in the video he used for A7#5b9 is an A Altered scale (thanks to Matt). The concept of this video is, improvise a scale starts from the ...


1

When I want to play a song, I listen to it again and again. And then again and again. Then I listen to some other artists playing the song. I listen to it many many times, so I can see how different everyone is playing it. Also, what I do is to try and sing the solos. I don't care if I sing the notes 100% correct 1, just what I can catch with my ear. ...


3

I will share 3 of the methods I know for playing outside: Chromatic Approach Notes: Right before you hit a very consonant note, especially if it's a downbeat, you can place a chromatic approach note in the upbeat, which is one semitone apart from the target (usually the root or a tone of the chord being played). Arpeggios are a great way to educate ...


4

I think listening to and learning solos from your favourite guitarists is incredibly important. You will the form your own improvisational style as a mixture of players you really like (because you like their tone or style) and your own. Transcribing solos is a great way to fully understand how a player is interpreting a set of changes, and shows you ...


5

You can do all of the above. But I find it important to not overwhelm yourself with loads and loads of information. Find things that catch your ear and figure them out. Make up your own licks and shed them. They might not show up in your playing for months, or even years, but they will eventually bubble up to the surface, and will inform your concept of ...


3

Listen to Louis Armstrong. He often plays the melody, but never without a special touch, getting there a little early, leaving a little late. Adding a subtle filigree of ornamentation. Never overplaying. And don't let it bother you that he is a horn player and you are not. Satchmo has been the teacher of every kind of musician - guitar players, piano ...


1

I wanted to add some information to the already-good answers, about how to properly "spell" this chord. Because chords are made up of stacked thirds, a seventh chord built on G will have to have some form of the notes G-B?-D?-F? (I'm using '?' to represent a yet-to-be-determined accidental). In the case of a Gdim7, these would become ...


4

One simple technique for playing outside is to play around on the pentatonic scale based on the extension of V chord you are playing. Since most outside/extensions/alterations happen on the V to create a stronger resolution to the I, it "sounds" right to go outside on the V rather than the ii or I. So, if I were playing a ii-V-I in C, I would add an ...


6

For me, the most important tool when it comes to the outside concept is the Jazz Minor scale. The jazz minor scale is essentially the ascending melodic minor scale. (In the classical world, this scale is different depending on whether you are ascending or descending the scale, but in a jazz context it remains the same. Study the jazz minor scale in all ...


14

The pentatonic scale is a great vehicle for moving outside. It has a very clear structure and sound which the listener is familiar with. Due to its simplicity and familiarity, you can get away with playing it, even if it does not fit the harmony in a traditional sense. The first thing I experimented with when I got into playing outside was "side-stepping", ...


3

Why is the diminished scale 'artificial'? In the sense of the quote you gave, it is artificial because it was not constructed from the overtone series. What is an overtone series? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_series_%28music%29 explains it very well. How is a major scale derived from it? There isn't a direct step by step method. It is easier ...


2

An artificial scale is a constructed scale, usually showing a lot of symmetry. The diminished scale is a perfect example: it alternates whole tone and half tone steps (e.g. starting from C): C D Eb F Gb Ab A (Bbb) B Note that the odd notes (1, 3, 5, and 7) as well as the even notes form a diminished seventh chord. Due to the symmetry there are only three ...


4

Overtones are the notes found when you play natural harmonics.Sometimes called upper partials. I've grouped these names together, but they're not strictly synonyms. Using a guitar (or bass) string, open gives note. Let's call it the root. The first harmonic, half way along it is an octave above the root. Next, at 1/3 comes a fifth. The next, at 1/4 is ...


4

This is a good example of a non-dominant diminished chord with a diatonic function (i.e. resolving to a diatonic chord). Note that often diminished chords function as dominants. This is the case when the root of the diminished chord is the leading tone to the root of the diatonic resolution chord. However, in your example this is not the case because then ...


3

Maybe because Gdim7 is the same thing as C♯dim7? That means that, between the C♯m7 and the F♯m7, two notes are going to be held from the first chord, mainly C♯ and E, and there is going to be descending chromatic motion in parallel minor thirds between G♯ and B in the C♯m7, and F♯ and A in the F♯m7, because the remaining two notes of the C♯dim 7 are G and ...


0

Examples of such linear harmony are found in Chopin, many times per page. Start with his opus 10 etudes in minor keys, for instance.


0

Or Dm7/G. Beware of G11. It's often used as a rough shorthand for F/G. If it matters to you whether the D is included or not, say so by writing F/G or Dm7/G. Think Plagal cadance with a dominant root.


3

The question whether Cm7 can be considered a dominant chord has already been answered (the answer is: no). But now for the chord scales. Any scale containing a Cm7 chord can function as a chord scale for Cm7: C dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb C aeolian: C D Eb F G Ab Bb C phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb The difference is the number of avoid notes that these scales ...


3

It's definitely not dominant because you don't have a diminished triad between the 3rd, 5th, and 7th so it can't function as dominant. If you break it up, you actually get a minor triad between the root, 3rd, and 5th and a major triad between the 3rd, 5th, and 7th. It is just a minor 7th found in a few different scales/modes pretty much any natural mode ...


0

If you limit the case in a modern jazz world, I believe you can consider "loosely dominant" a minor seventh chord if you establish its "tonic" a fifth below. For example in a dorian mode. This one is the first proper mode for a minor seventh chord.



Top 50 recent answers are included