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0

The The Jazz Piano Book by Mark Levine is kind of a reference for jazz standards. I learned starting by open and close positions for major, minor and dominant chords as shown in the book. Then practice playing II-V-I combinations in 5ths (that is pretty much a Jazz standard) alternating between closed-open-closed exercises and open-closed-open exercises. ...


2

Here's what I was taught by my teacher with regards to solo piano when I was first starting off with him. It is a method to play solo piano with the chord spread out between both hands and the melody as the top note of the chord. It's definitely not the only approach to this, but it is a systematic approach that really helped me. Let's say you're playing ...


4

I think it would be a great mistake to "forget" the alternate picking technique that you learned and start all over with economy picking. What you should probably due is two things: first, work on and improve your alternate picking technique. You definitely haven't reached the limit yet. The second thing you should do is add other techniques to your picking ...


2

You've lots of low notes at your disposal! Just use them with l.h. and put the top parts of the chords in with r.h. Assuming you're accompanying a soloist of some sorts. If not, then you'll have to maybe arpeggiate 1,5 etc. with l.h. and some sparse chords along the melody with r.h.


0

Ignoring all discussion and answering only the title question: a b5 means you are replacing the 5 and keeping all other notes (including the 4 intact.) A #11 means you are replacing the 4th and keeping all other notes (including the 5) intact. So the answer is: whichever is correct when used in the context of the surrounding chords and melody of the song. ...


0

Whether or not notes are dropped on the harmony instrument (piano or guitar) partly depends on the voicing. It's perfectly acceptable to play both 3rd and 11 or #11, but you may choose to do this with a spread apart voicing rather than close together. The jazz pianist usually includes the third and seventh, as you know (or the 4th if sus), with everything ...


0

I bet we could identify 20 or so "valid" spellings of that chord. And herein lies the rub: enharmonic spellings are the bane of existence for musicians trying to understand harmony. A chord symbol has two purposes: to name a particular grouping of notes such that it can be communicated to others intact, and to identify its FUNCTION within the harmony. ...


-1

That looks like a G augmented chord in first inversion with a ninth added and fifth doubled. If you are wondering if that D# is a raised fifth then I will say yes that is a G chord with an augmented fifth. Also my question will be if the other D in the chord is raised or not?


0

I agree that writing a chord voicing that leaves out the 5 is a bit of a curveball. The reason it's a b13 and not a #5 is basically because it IS a G in a B chord, and that's the "least gymnastics" way to annotate it. Also, if there's any note you're going to leave out of a dominant chord voicing and still maintain the flavor, the 5th is the one that can ...


0

The book answer is incorrect. By convention, a B7(b9 #11 b13) has an unaltered fifth and also an augmented 4th (11th). The technically correct answer for the written chord is B7(b5 b9 b13), because the written chord does not have both the #11 and b5. The general rule is that notated available altered tensions do not replace or alter chord tones.


1

Your answer is fine. The books answer is fine. Jazz. Altered dominants. You could also call b13 a #5. avoiding the altered fifth nomenclature may indicate the 5th is included E.g. #11 might indicate inclusion of the fifth. While b5 mans no unaltered fifth. Same goes for b13 vs #5 b9 and #9 are also used on some altered dominants - These indicate not ...


0

Don't try to learn all the modes at once. Each mode has a distinctive "flavor" that can only be recognized with practice so concentrate on mastering the sound of one mode at a time. You have had your whole life to get used to the sounds of the traditional major and minor scales and these patterns are deeply ingrained - even untrained musicians can usually ...



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