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0

Aside from knowing your theory and understanding what notes go with what chords, the answer is in your question. Phrasing. Phrases, just like spoken language. Breathe, pause, accent, get quiet, get loud, shift rhythms. Don't just ramble through run-on sentences of notes. Learn to sing in your head or out loud as you play. Rhythm is so import and to phrasing. ...


0

don't take classical lessons. It doesn't prepare you adequately for jazz. The problem is that classical teachers don't teach you about chords (harmony) and they don't encourage you to play by ear or to improvise - all of which are fundamental to jazz. So, my recommendation is to find a jazz pianist in your city, someone who plays in a way that you like, and ...


3

Here are a few things that jazz players play over a dominant chord and give a 'jazzy' sound Let's say the chord that is being played is G7. What you can play is: G#o Arpeggio (G# is b9 of G7, so that note can also be added in the chord) G# auxiliary diminished scale If the chord is G7#5, you can play the whole tone scale. If the chord is G7(alt) (which ...


0

Reharmonization of the chord progression so as to provide different target tones for your improvisation. That's what it boils down to. I recommend you learn reharmonization techniques.


0

If you are talking about improvisation, every jazz musician must get to know how to get the phrases. Everybody is different. You should know what jazz types are you. Swing, ska, blues-jazz, fusion, rock-jazz, etc, you can choose more than one, so it'll make you unique. Then you choose your favorite artists. Perhaps if you chose blues-jazz, you can pick Jimi ...


5

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


4

You know what you should do is learn jazz tunes. Learn the heads on the standards then worry about improvisation. It is limitless what can be done in the Jazz world but you have to know fundamentals. Your second post is too general, so I am assuming you need to learn standards and listen to a lot of Miles and look at transcriptions of his playing. Start ...


6

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


1

In most tunes, four bars is the smallest unit you will find a complete phrase, musical idea, or melody. although you will often see it in eight as well (a complete chorus or bridge or A section of the tune), but youll never see it in two because two bars is too short to express a complete musical idea.


3

This is a really subjective question. If you like playing on a 5 string bass then by all means get a 5 string bass. You might even want to try a 6 string before making that decision. Use however many strings you are comfortable with. There really isn't an absolute answer. Any number of strings is good for any kind of music. In any standard configurations, ...


2

As a classically-trained pianist who is now beginning to learn jazz piano, I would recommend taking classical piano lessons because with that comes classical music theory which is an important thing to understand, regardless of your chosen style. Once you are suitably adept with classical piano, you could then begin to learn the features and practices of ...


0

A b13 voicing can be exactly the same in sound as a #5 voicing, but it depends on the notes you use in the construction of your voicings. The nomenclatures are different because each implies different notes which can be added to the chord. For example, in the case of a b13 voicing, you could use BOTH the natural fifth and the b13th, but in the case of a #5 ...


2

If a jazz pianist were to ask you the exact same question about classical music (in its broader sense), where would you start? I have taught jazz to many experienced and professional classical pianists, and I know of no shortcut to years of study and practice. If your question was intended to mean where could you start, I would recommend The Jazz Piano ...


0

There are so many chords that you can use in Jazz Music. Like Major7 (maj7/M7), Major9, Major11, even Diminished which have a form like 1-3-5-7 in maj7, 1-3-5-7-9 in maj9, or 1-b3-5-7 in min7. There are so many genres of jazz that have different chord to use. Like bossa-nova, they play basses just the 1st and 5th note. Swing, they do walking bass which a ...


5

That's a valid voicing of both a B7#9#5 and a B7#9b13 as long as we aren't concerned with the spelling. Jazz musicians often are less concerned with spelling and more concerned with things being easy to sight read at the gig. I (and others, but not everyone) often think of the chord nomenclature as implying things about appropriate scale choices: #5 ...


0

B=root. D# =maj.3rd. G = b6. A = m7. D = m10. There is no b13, as G natural is too soon in the rising note list.Had the G been an F##, then B7#5 is a starter. Then the D on top, which could have been a C##, making #9, could have been B7#5#9. BUT it isn't.As is, it may be called B7b6b10, but that's hardly a common chord name.Someone goofed.


5

Chord nomenclature is dependent on context. Without knowing the context, that chord could have different (and possibly equally correct labels) such as Eb+maj7(#11) (if respelled) or Gadd9(b13) to give a couple of examples. I do not think you are correct in your reasoning - read on! I disagree that interpreting the chord with an F## would imply a G# in any ...


1

Even if your interest may not be in classical music, you need to work on classical harmony, for it is the basis of any tonal music (jazz, etc, included). There are many books on classical harmony, but one I suggest you look at is Tchaikovsky's Guide to the Practical Study of Harmony, as it is short and well explained, and freely (and legally) available at ...



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