New answers tagged

6

Yes it stays in the same key. There is a very specific way to notate a key change on sheet music and in this case if it were changing to the key of C major/A minor you would see all the places there would be flats have naturals in their place. You can even see in the chord symbol that the D notes are still flat in that measure.


4

For a temporary change of clef, there is no need. However, if the 'left hand' continues to use the bass clef , say, in the next line, it will revert to the proper key sig., with the four flats (in this case) in the appropriate places for the bass clef, which obviously will be signed.


2

Yes the key signature remains the same. Piano music may have several instances where both hands play high and really there is no reason to reiterate the key signature when the change of clef is just to not use unruly ledger lines.


0

sure there is. same way ya do it manually. relying on chords won't be as good as just using melody. due to the chords often being dom7 and that minor7 being out of keysig. kinda. take the melody, see where it's 7 most popular notes are, boom - there's your keysig usually. due to pop usually being in major, vocals and bass usually staying in keysig. ...


1

I think you are on the right track, because you limit your question to a simple pop context. But, I would suggest this: Always keep in mind a song can modulate. The whole song may be in one key, but you might also need to apply some "local" key changes to sections of a song. Caveat: when pop styles use minor harmony there is a tendency for the music to ...


1

Key signature and note collection notwithstanding, a musical composition that is written in F Lydian is NOT a mode of the key of C major - even though the key signature would be the same as for C major and all of the notes in F Lydian are also in C major. In fact, the so called “key signature” does not always tell you what key a musical work is written ...


0

let's simplify this and first answer a couple of basic questions about modes and modal music; (1) All music is modal (2) A true mode (other than Maj./Ionian or natural minor/Aeolian ) are limited to 5 tones and only to 1 octave range, from the tonic to the dominant. In other words, 5 tones are not enough to establish either major nor minor ...


1

F lydian has the same key signature as C major (in other words it has the same notes, the same number of sharps and flats, in this case zero.) It also has the same key signature as A minor. However all three are different keys, because they have different tonal centres. A key is named after the note it tends to gravitate to. A passage in A minor clearly ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...


14

Both C# minor and E major keys have the same key signature, so there is no difference there. This relationship is called 'relative key'. Each major key has a relative minor one, with the same key signature (to find it, descend a minor 3rd or ascend a major 6th from your tonic). Similarly for the minor key. To sum up the difference: These two keys have the ...


2

This isn't in one key. I cannot say for sure what is going on here, but I can understand the chords used: First 4 bars: G# minor Next 4 bars: D major First 3 bars (second line): E minor, which I figured from the second bar Next 4 bars: G# minor Last 2 bars: D major. There are chromatic alterations from bar to bar which most likely changes the key ...



Top 50 recent answers are included