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1

What key signatures are "easier" can depend on what instrument you're playing and on whether you mean "easy to read" or "easy to sound the notes". It may also depend on what you're used to. On the piano, I like pieces with a few sharps or flats in the key signature because it is easier to pass the thumb under when you are going from a black key to a white ...


0

You can achieve a certain paradigm shift when you realise that scales are just a series of notes a set amount of semitones / intervals from the root note. The Major scale for instance has it semitones between the 3/4 and 7/8 scale degrees. So if you have 8 notes starting and ending on the same letter name with semitones at these places then you have a Major ...


3

Yes, I think it's generally true for a simple reason: we all (well just about all) learn to read the notes of the staff initially in their default, natural position. We learned our "Every Good Boy Does Fine" and so forth before we learned our sharps and flats. When we do learn about sharps and flats, they're presented as exceptions to what happens ...


0

I believe this is very subjective and varies from musician to musician. To give you an example, I play the trombone (Bb key) and while learning the instrument flats where more common than sharps, so that's what I grew more used to it. In fact, I wouldn't even say it's hard to play the sharps. What is hard is reading when there are a lot of sharps in there, ...


3

I can definitely understand why some keys appear to be more intimidating than others, but this intimidation is most likely caused by a lack of familiarity. For example, consider the sentence "I adumbrated a plan so vague that my fellow politicians slapped my back in approbation." This sentence seems fairly intimidating, especially if you aren't familiar ...


7

Every instrument has keys that are easy to play and and keys that are not very easy to play in. There are even transposing instruments that are built to play in a certaint key natrually that isn't in the key of C so for some instruments playing in the key of C, which has no sharps or flats, is actually harder. For example the first instrument I learned was ...


3

Right after the time signature change you see a natural sign, which would not be necessary for the assumed implicit key signature reset. Key signatures are very important and therefore very explicit. For a change of the key signature typically all existing accidentals are first neutralized and then the new ones added.


1

The only time a key signature changes is when the composer labels it as such. Using the image you provided as an example, the piece would remain in E major, until at some point in the song, the composer states that the piece is to be played in let's say G major. I have taken piano lessons for ten years, and on occasion dabble in composition.


-3

They have nothing in common. Well, that is not enterily true. If you record it and change the speed on the playback not the input source, then you'd be raising a bit the key collaterally :)



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