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To expand, enharmonic equivalence is an invention of convenience. Musical intervals are just frequency ratios, and ratios with smaller numbers sound more consonant. For example, the octave is 2:1, and the perfect fifth is 3:2, the two simplest. Compounding ratios by stacking intervals serves to create more notes. However, since no nonzero power of 3/2 can ...


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Technically, there could be, you just keep extending the pattern. You could even keep extending it to the point where you need to start using double flats, though this is almost never done in practice. The key of F contains: B♭ The key of B♭ contains: B♭, E♭ The key of E♭ contains: B♭, E♭, A♭ The key of A♭ ...


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There is already a key signature starting on E. So there is no need for one. Also C♭ major is the last of the flat keys and it has a flat on every note in the scale. So where exactly are you going to count from there? Even if you do get a scale starting on F♭ it will most probably just be 8 notes that are all enharmonic equivalents of E major so, ...



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