Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

The issue is your assumption that the horn and trumpet are in fact in F and B-flat. Trumpets can be pitched in a variety of keys, and horn historically has played in one harmonic series or another without the use of valves, but by using crooks to pitch the instrument in one key or another. In this case, the horn part is written in C and the trumpet part is ...


2

When you write the analysis, mention your knowledge of melodic and harmonic scales, and your decision to use the natural minor scale instead. Discuss whether the lack of a strong dominant>tonic structure including the G# leading note allows it to be in a "key". And make sure the piece IS melodically centered on A. That should cover any possible ...


0

Contemporary music uses the natural minor form basically as a scale on its own but in traditional harmony at least the natural minor form is only used when the melodic minor goes down after going up. (The sharpened sixth and seventh scale degrees then going natural when going down.) You may want to investigate whether this non traditional use of the natural ...


0

If your piece focuses on notes "A" and "E" rather than "C" and "G", then you are in A natural minor. In other words, "A" and "E" represent "home base": the song tends to resolve to these notes, target them, land on them and stay there, etc.


3

It is very typical for the key of A minor to have the G# leading tone, which helps to add tension to the V (E) chord, and brings a clear resolution to the tonic (A). However, even if only G-natural is used, if your listener still feels a sense that A is the tonic, i.e., the piece revolves around A, then that would make a safe argument that the piece is ...


1

First off, two links. One person's transcription of the chords for "Crush": http://www.azchords.com/d/davematthewsband-tabs-1009/crush-tabs-104305.html And another person's "accurate Dave Matthews Band tablature": http://www.dmbtabs.com/song.php?sid=41 Those two seem to match pretty well and seem good to me compared to a live performance with just Dave and ...


22

The fact that you are in A minor without G# (or F# and G#) means that you are in A natural minor. What defines a scale as minor or major, is the third of the scale, not the accidentals. If you have A as the root of your scale and the third is a C, then the scale is a minor one. There are 3 different types of minor scales: A harmonic minor (it has G#) A ...



Top 50 recent answers are included