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I don't think we have to worry about the sax being a transposing instrument in this case. He's seeing a piece in one sharp, he'd like to play it in two sharps (let's gloss over the possible B minor/D MINOR? confusion for now). So it was in G major or E minor. He wants it it D major or B minor. Either way, it's going to have to be transposed down a ...


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When you play a 'C' note written on alto sax music, you produce Eb concert.So concert Eb key is written in C. Concert Dm is written in Bm, with 2# on the sax music. You want to play in 2#, but major. That's D on your music. Watermelon man is G concert, so needs for you to be in F concert so your sax music will have to be written in D, 2#. That's if I've ...


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Okay, take your tune, figure out what degree of the scale it begins on. (You can do this by comparing the tune with the scale that fits it.) Let's say the tune begins on the fifth degree of the scale (i.e. the fifth note of the scale). Let's say you want to write it down in the key of B minor (as you would see it written for your E flat instrument). ...


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off drpylon's A#m example: Without this "strange" enharmonic notation, the chord built on the 4th degree would be notated as: natural F, G#, natural C. Looking at this on a score would not look right; I read somewhere that the one of the purposes of enharmonic notation is to allow the writer (and reader) the ability to visually see what appears to be a ...


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These scales logically exist but, you're right, it's hard to imagine a circumstance where we'd need them! Occasionally it's appropriate to use a scale outside the scope of key-signatures (they only go as far as 7 sharps or 7 flats, we don't use double sharps or flats in key-signatures). G# major is not ridiculous.


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Regarding key signatures, you'd be hard pressed to find a musical work which has a key signature in either of those keys you've mentioned. The screenshot of your examples are even without any key signature; it's difficult for a staff to accommodate that that many accidentals and they were likely never intended to be able to encompass every possible key ...


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Truth is that it IS flat; however if you played A natural up high it wouldn't sound too bad because it's so far away in frequency terms. If it sounds "ok" then that's why.


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Most scales are assumed to be octave-repeating, due to the way that we hear a similarity between notes that are an octave apart (the reason for this being that with many instruments, any note contains harmonic partials at the frequencies of all the overtones of a note an octave below). This includes the diatonic scale, which is the scale that standard ...


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In principle key signatures apply to all octaves, while individual accidentals apply only to the octave, where they appear. Sometimes score editors are helpful by repeating individual accidentals (courtesy or cautionary accidentals); if these are not especially marked (smaller print, parentheses) it makes the rule more diffcult to recognize for the ...


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Most scales are assumed to be octave-repeating, due to the way that we hear a similarity between notes that are an octave apart (the reason for this being that with many instruments, any note contains harmonic partials at the frequencies of all the overtones of a note an octave below). This includes the diatonic scale, which is the scale that standard ...


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Accidentals in a key signature always apply to any octave you play in. The human ear hears the same note in neighbouring octaves as almost identical (in fact, many people have a hard time distinguishing them at all). People sing along to a tune in a higher or lower octave with no qualms, and often without noticing. Some instruments, e.g. kettle drums, emit ...


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They're just extreme versions of enharmonic scales-that is, scales that exist in an identical sounding key but are spelled differently. It simply has to do with the fact that we have to have as many keys as possible to allow correct spellings of chords and whatnot. For example, A# minor is the relative minor of C# major (they share all the same notes). Now, ...



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