New answers tagged

0

E C#m G# A: Answer, key of E. Sharps in E are F#, C#, G#, D#. A is a natural note in the key. To determine sharps in a key: The note before the Key which would be D# in key of E is the last sharp. The rest follow the circle of fifths clockwise (each a 5th apart): F# C# G# D# and you're at E. C#m, G#, A, E: This is the same, key of E, using the same ...


0

Luckiest Man- Dm/F - which when written on the stave have the same key sig. one flat. However, he's playing with capo on fret 1. Say it Ain't So - Eb, moving to relative minor of Cm. Where is my Mind - E, and its relative minor, C#m. All use the V of the relative minor, which is usually a major or 7th chord not found in the relative major's armoury. A ...


3

The way I was taught to determine a song's key is fairly straightforward: You list the pitch class (all the known pitches in a melody) and use that to determine the key. In this case, we have a collection of chords instead of a melody, so let's use that. I'm doing this more or less in my head, so please consider this a rough draft and let me know if there ...


3

There is rarely one unique scale (key) that a given set of chords will fit into; usually, at least two scales will fit pretty well. Another way to see this: the difference between two scales can be a single note that is different; but if the distinguishing pitch is never played during the song, then which scale is correct? The answer is, whichever the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included