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1

I find it a bit depressing to see a lot of questions refer to a musical situation as "acceptable" or even "Correct". I think there are three ways of going about making music: 1) Classical/formal training: Learn to play (often amazing) pieces of music written on a page. I've never done this so I'm not going to say too much about it, but having played with a ...


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There is nothing wrong; it is the order of things. Teenagers find out that driving (and love) is not what they learned in school. College kids find out that their degrees do (and don't) prepare them for their careers. Parents find out that despite all the books, they just sort of make it up as they go along and hope for the best. Music students find out ...


3

From a classical training on piano, where no teacher actually explained that the scales I had to learn would be useful - they were merely something I would have to play in the exam, to realising, 30 years later, that they were in fact the basic formula from which a tune in a particular key could be made. It was long, hard journey, but for many years now, I ...


2

What are we doing wrong? Sounds like teaching theory more than actual pieces. If we never taught theory there would be no concept of key, scale, or chord in a limiting or structural sense. If we taught mostly pieces that challenge (or flat-out reject) typical western music theory and structure, then there would be less of a perception of the theory as being ...


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Edit: Answering as a student rather than an educator. The biggest factor for me was starting with and focusing on only classical music for years. This "play what's on the page, as perfectly as possible" and a focus on the key signature instructing what "valid" notes are led to my personal conclusion that you must perform in key and block out notes that ...


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I would like to answer this as a music student who has studied harmony, modern harmony and counterpoint for the last years and I find myself asking the same question as well as others in the same context. I have yet to see a theory method that focuses on the creation of the melody, rather than its harmonization. Also, minimum and untimely attention is given ...


1

If your sample is anything to go on, your progression isn't really Cm-G-Dm-Am (or its transposition up a tone), it's (Cm x 3)-G | Dm-Am-Cm-G | (repeat last phrase ad lib.). Each phrase is ending on the major chord, so what you really have is, tentatively, i-i-i-V | (v of V)-(v of ii)-i-V | etc. I say "tentatively" advisedly, as Laurence is quite right that ...


2

There are two ways to determine what key something is in. The first is to look at the set of notes (the scale) that you're using, and find a key signature that matches. The second is to find which note chord is being "tonicized." This is done by using a rising-fourth chord progression, which acts as a V-I (dominant-tonic) relationship. Both of these methods ...


0

Some observations: 1) It's interesting that base of the chords moves by fifths, I mean: C +5 --> G G +5 --> D D +5 --> A Is this a thing? I don't know... 2) Having plain chords Cm - G - Dm - Am (having no seventh, sus e.t.c) that contain both Eb, E and F as notes, makes it imposible to be just one minor or major key. 3) Transposing it by a tone (just ...


1

EDIT: Clarified that the logic outlined herein is best explained as parallel modulation between the MELODIC minor (not natural minor) and major key (see explanation below). Well there does not seem to be much agreement on what key the song is in and I have seen no completely convincing arguments that put this progression solidly in any one particular key. ...


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Not every song has to be "in a key". Yours is ambiguous. That's fine.


3

I'll tell you what my ears tell me. I'm referring to the progression that you actually played: Dm A Em Bm I hear this progression not in one key but I hear two tonal centers. The first is A major: iv I. The second is B minor: iv i There are several reasons why this works and why it keeps circling seemingly without end. In both tonal centers it is a ...


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Taking a chord from the parallel minor of the associated major key is a thing! Let's break your song down to simple notes: Cm chord - C, Eb, G G chord - G, B, D Dm chord - D, F, A Am chord - A, C, E The only accidental here is Eb, but we also have B and E, so it's safe to say we're not exactly in Bb major/G minor. Notes C, D, G and A appear in more than ...



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