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1

Here's a 'formula' for finding the natural and sharp notes, expressed as Python/numpy calculations (MATLAB would do just as well). It's not a refined calculation, just an easy way to generate the numbers and group them (mixing arrays, sets and sorted lists). i = np.arange(5,200,7) # numbers from 5 up, stepping by 7 natural = set((i%12)[:7]) # modulus by ...


0

The "missing" in "Are we missing something?" implies a value judgment, so instead I'll just address some of the key differences between equal temperament and historical temperaments. At least these things would be different: Older tunings, meantone or tempered, generally had a set of keys where the important major thirds were just, or at least closer to ...


0

Some of the "mood" is cultural, e.g. certain Maqam are said to evoke feelings of a distant desert, which might be tricky if the audience has never even seen such, or for one who does not know that minor keys indicate sadness because their musical culture is based on rhythm, leaving classical works to sound much the same to them.


-1

I don't think so, as instruments were tuned to sound good in one particular key. True, they didn't sound good in another key, due to the tuning vagaries, but in one key, it all worked. So, with 12et, now, we could play a piece in any key we wanted, and it would sound authentic, but what difference would that make?


2

A somewhat simpler answer, for us mere mortals. Write the note names around in a circle, as in the numbers on a clock face, in the same order that you did earlier. C can go anywhere - I put it at 12 o'clock. Start at C (no # or b), and count clockwise 7. You get to G. 1#. Go another 7, you get to D. 2#. And so on. Now back to C, this time count ...


1

Yes, there is a pattern. The initial starting point is the following two facts: Traditionally, the western musical scale was based on a 7-note scale, named A-G. Acoustically, the most basic harmony, aside from unisons and octaves, is the perfect fifth (P5), which can be very closely approximated by 7/12ths of an octave (where each 12th of an octave is ...


1

As you already do have a minor chord on the V (C#m) you could, at the end of your verse, turn it into a C#m7 and add a little ii7 - V7 - Imaj7 progression to give your chorus some new kick to shine. -> C#m7 F#7 Bmaj7 and use the chords of your new tonic B (or even Bm)... or add a little bridge between verse and chorus that executes that ...


2

Matt's answered the first part, here's the second. In the key of F#m, relative to A maj., the easily usable chords are : A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m, G#o. Another set is available to add interest : the parallel minor set of Am, Bo, C, Dm, Em, F, G. Using sus chords will give another dimension, by taking away the 'gender' of the chord - maj/min. But don't use one ...


3

The Bm chord has the note D as its third, so you aren't in the key of C# minor, but in the key of F# minor. So your progression is actually: || F#sus2 | C#m | Bm | Esus2 || The reason why the C# minor pentatonic scale works is because it is (also) a subset of the F# (natural) minor scale, which is the basic scale fitting all 4 chords of your progression.


0

Just for clarification about the term modulation: As a musical term it means the process of moving to another key (as TONICA) (root) by means of a chord-progression that clearly establishes the functional part (TONICA) of the new key. Sometimes it is enough to play a DOMINANT seventh chord to establish the new TONICA of a chord that lies a pure 4th above ...


0

As pointed out in @mramosch's answer, there is no standard seven-note (heptatonic) scale containing both an Eb and an E. Also note that we're not talking about modulation when we encounter the movement C to Cm (see below for the most common occurrence of this progression without modulation). When playing a melody over the change C - Cm you want to make the ...


0

One possible answer is E harmonic minor. E harmonic minor has all of the notes I'm looking for. http://www.jazclass.aust.com/scales/scahar.htm


1

You can never have a scale that includes an Eb and an E at the same time because that would mean two notes are derived from the same root, namely E. That is not the definition of a scale. You can only have each note once!!! If you said C D# E -> this would be possible but that would not leave any place for a D. So you are stuck with a one-and-a-half ...


0

The relative key modulation would not be Cmin to CMAJ but rather C minor to Eb Major the relative Major key. This will enable you to use a couple of pivot chords that smooth out the modulations. If you have your c minor phrase and you end the phrase on the dominant you can let it resolve with the chord c-eb-g which could either be tonic chord of c minor or ...


0

Sounds like the notes belong to A pent. min. There should probably be an open key sig. as the key refers to C major. With chords of A7, D7 and E7, as you state, it's firmly in A blues. No other key has I, IV and V as those. If there are no Fs or F#s, then they won't get played anyway. The writer may as well have put Fb in the key sig! A lot of tab writers ...


0

On the piano today you'll get only the sound of your melody or harmony higher in pitch (minus different resonances of the instrument itself). This is so because the piano is tuned equally (bad) ie. all keys sound the same. This is called equal temperament. Some people think it is bad because one could say only octaves are pure, the rest is an approximation. ...


2

There's two issues here: what happens in music NOTATION, and what happens in the MUSIC, when you transpose to a different key. The short answer on the music notation is that the pitch intervals from note to note of a transposed melody don't change when you change the key, thus for example if you had a melody in the key of C, starting on the note E, then ...


1

Seeing as Major scales have semitones all in the same place transposing between different Major keys will still garner similar (If not identical) general Major tonality. You often want to do this for practical considerations. Guitar music that is not written specifically for guitar almost always has to be transposed either to E / A or D. This does not take ...


8

This is called Transposition. For instance, if you are in C major and have this melody: C-F-E-G-C and you move to E major scale, the melody would be: E-A-G#-B-E. You have to keep the intervals the same (A perfect fourth remains a perfect fourth etc), but the notes change.



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