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1

You mention "...showcase a vocal range" -- sometimes it's out of necessity rather than showcasing. Two examples I can think of offhand include: Islands in the Stream as recorded by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. Kenny has the vocal lead for the first verse and chorus (in C major), but then the song modulates two whole tones lower (A♭ major) so that Dolly ...


2

In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


0

What's to "approach"? Those are the chords. They don't fit any neat system of all being in one scale. It would be ridiculous to invent constant modulations. Lots of music does this. If your system of theory doesn't "allow" it, find a better system!


2

I don't know of any clear-cut fully worked out published approach, but there is a lot of research out there. Here are some pointers. David Temperley's is a leading researched in this field and his paper An Algorithm for Harmonic Analysis his the most in depth approach I've seen so far (although very heavy on the music theory side). His book The Cognition of ...


7

Transposing instruments are so due to convention, not by a technical property. The main advantage is, that different instruments of the same family can share the same mapping of note->fingering and so makes it easier for the player to switch instruments. The disadvantage is, that the sheet music has to be adapted to exactly the instrument used and therefore ...


20

There are two concepts and ideas that happen in music which, when combined, explain why this happens. The first is that the way certain instruments are constructed affects what sounds they can produce. The E♭ alto saxophone, the B♭ clarinet, and the horn in F each can easily play in the key designated. Typically, when learning to play these ...


1

The simplest approach is to consider the tonality as G Mixolydian; here, Bb is simply an altered chord (the III borrowed from the minor).


0

A Bb chord is not in the scale of C major, but it's perfectly acceptable (common, even) to use it in a song in that key. It doesn't need any special justification, or to be "borrowed" from anywhere. It's just the chord on the b7th. Very commonplace.


1

There is often the facility in a song to use the PARALLEL KEY. For instance, in C maj., there's C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bo. In C min., there'll be Cm, Do, Eb, Fm, Gm, Ab, Bb. So any of this bank can and are used in a piece 'in C'. This then says that the piece in question could well be 'in C'. Thinking another way, with all but the G chord, it could be in F. ...


2

There is no key which contains both G major and Bb major. Because that would require both B and Bb notes. It could be voiced as an A#, to fit the standard rule that a scale has each lettered note name exactly once. The Chords describe these notes (although they may be 'spelled' differently, meaning Bb can be expressed as A#) G, A, Bb, B, C, D, F No ...


3

I would say it's a G mixolydian. I listened to the song, and the G and C both had strong tonality, although the G felt more like tonic, so it's the mode of C starting on G which would be mixolydian. The Bb chord is probably a result of the artist trying to give the song a minor feel, because it modulates to g minor, then promptly back into the G mixolydian. ...


1

TL;DR: It's just better to write since F♯-minor has a lot less signs to write than G♭-minor. The original tonality you listed was G♭-major; it has six ♭s. "Converting" major tonality to same-named minor one requires to flatten it triply: add three ♭, or remove three ♯s. (Of course, you should use circle of fifths; this is a ...


2

G-flat minor is, as you note, a terribly awkward key, since its relative major is B-double-flat. That is, the third scale degree is enharmonically equivalent to A, but it's actually B-double-flat. That has nine flats in its key signature (or, actually, five flats and two double flats). F-sharp minor has the rather more normal relative major of A major, ...



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