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Bb is the natural scale starter for brass combos, so Bb minor is a natural for funeral marches. Brass instruments are decidedly not equally tempered, so different minors have different characters. If you are playing a natural trumpet (valveless), and that's sort of the instrument type that was quite a bit around when the key associations were established, ...


0

I compose in B-flat minor for some time now.. And you can easily do a positive melody in this key. For me this scale has deep feelings and definitely lot of hope in it. So i believe it can be used for death in movies (to awake feelings), but kinda the way -everything is gonna turn around, not everything is lost.


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A modulation is any change of tonic note or root pitch, so yes you can modulate without actually changing the key signature. Interestingly, changing from C major to C minor is not by this definition a modulation in the strictest sense. But it is common that people will also call this dramatic change a "modulation" as well. I don't believe this is strictly ...


1

Like Bob,from the title, I thought you meant C to Cm, the tonic or parallel minor. But, yes, it's a modulation, if a 'minor' one. Forgive the pun.The key signature won't change, although when reading the dots, there is usually the clue of the G# (in Am), as that note is not diatonic to C, but often is used in Am. You could say that the C maj. is Ionian, ...


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@BobBroadley is right, but there's also a point of view in which this particular phenomenon is described by the term "mutation." I don't think the "mutation" people would disagree that it's a modulation, but they find "mutation" more specific and therefore more helpful. (I learned "mutation" myself, but I haven't studied this stuff for a long time so I ...


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Yes, this is a modulation to the relative minor, which shares the same key signature. In classical music, although sometimes in popular music too, accidentals would be used to create strong cadences within the minor key. For instance, the leading note of A minor would be raised to G#, particularly when used as part of chord V, to create a major V chord, and ...


1

Short answer: It's a convenient way to identify pieces that were typically not given other titles. More involved and Bach-specific answer: Choice of key was an important part of the composition for two reasons (with the first being much more important): Different keys had different tunings and hence sounded different before the widespread use of equal ...


4

These are all good answers, but I'd just add a historical note. Composers before the time of, say Beethoven, composers like Bach and Mozart, often did not publish all or even most of their musical works, either because no one wanted them, or because they wanted to keep the pieces for their own use. The vast majority of Bach's music was not published in his ...


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It's not so much that the choice of key was fundamental, it was more a case of identifying each particular piece, with the form being so similar in some cases. If Bach's friend said after a concert "I really liked that fugue", Bach may have said "You mean the Bb one?" It was so much simpler just to label them with keys anyway.It didn't happen all the ...


5

"Fugue" is just a form and style of composition of which Bach alone wrote hundreds. Same thing for "Sonata", "String Quartet", "Symphony", etc. it's not that the particular key is of central importance or that transposition would necessarily change the piece entirely, it's just a convenient way to distinguish between various iterations of the same form. They ...


1

In this case, these were pieces in a collection called "The Well-Tempered Clavier" And in this case preludes, fugues, simphonia and inventions were numbered according to their appearance in the collection and the key. "Invention #1 in C" "Prelude and Fugue No. 17 in A-flat major" for example. In these pieces, the exposition or main theme was presented in the ...


4

It depends on how many different chords there are in the song. For jazz, the traditions of chord substitution, use of ii-V progressions, possible polytonality and shifting key centers may mean you have to look at a dozen chords and grok the chord movement to understand the key. But for the overwhelming majority of songs you only need one chord, the final ...


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95% of the time the first chord will tell you what key the song is in


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There isn't any hard and fast rule. The first thing is that the key signature narrows it down to two keys. So, for example, if there are no sharps or flats in the key signature, the key is either C major or A minor. Most of the time, the first few measures in the piece will establish whether you're in the major or minor key. Beethoven's 5th symphony is a ...


3

Chords, I'd say two. One will be the tonic, and the other, usually, the dominant. There are songs that use tonic and sub-dominant, which, funnily enough, is the same relationship, but the other way round.Given a minor key, the dominant may well be major, so it's easier to determine.Obviously, the more the merrier.Working through a song, three could be enough ...


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If the song is simple enough (or we just focus on a section with no modulations) and we have a pitch reference (or perfect pitch!), then identifying the key boils down to identifying the tonic and the modality (major, minor, something else). With proper training, identifying the tonic is easy. You just need to find the note that gives the feeling of ...


2

Unless those students have perfect pitch - absolute pitch is an accepted term- this is nigh on impossible. They will be able to identify WHICH part of a piece has the tonic in it, but that's a different 'skill'. I say skill as absolute pitch is often an inborn thing, although it can be learned to a degree. Finding that tonic part of a piece:often, but not ...


4

For stringed instruments such as the violin, playing in sharp keys (more accurately, 0 to 4 sharps) means making multiple main notes of the tonality coincide with open strings. This amplifies the instrument's show-off potential in two ways: In fast passages, fingering is simplified because any time the melody touches on one of the four open strings, ...


2

In this case, as someone who sight reads jazz, I would definitely agree to start with the first key and write key changes within the song, unless it's very often. there are certainly some songs that are written all in accidentals a because there simply is no key for the song. if the key changes are helping the ready by providing a clear view of what's ...


1

It depends how much and how often the 'key centre' is going to move. Any piece will have what most would call a 'key centre' as in the start or finish sounds like home. This then would establish the key for the piece. A key signature would then be helpful. For changes of a bar or two, usually accidentals are used - they tell the reader that something has ...


10

This depends on the circumstances, but I would suggest it is more common to write no key signature (or the best closest match like "F" if all B tends to be Bb.) especially in the case of changes that last only a few measures. Here are my reasons: 1) It's not normal for jazz music to include alot of key changes written as new key signatures. This will happen ...


5

I'd say to write all the key changes. Average sight-readers should be able to glance at it and instantly recognize it and reposition. If you're writing accidentals then they have to check every single one. That isn't a problem for experienced sight readers, but it's still more work.


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Very interesting !! Just listened to the opening bars, and it's in C#minor. That's probably why it sounds like a C#, not a D. Now whether the recording has been slowed down a smidgen is conjecture, or whether the cello is actually tuned differently I don't know. So, yes it sounds like C# 'cos it is. Couldn't find one in 'Dm'.Unless, of course, the tuning was ...



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