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3

The verse is just plain E minor. I understand your initial confusion, but you have to remember that you can bring things in from outside the key without changing the key. In this the harmony is simply built on and utilizes the different scales used for minor which are the natural, harmonic, and melodic minor. If you were to naturally build 7th chords off ...


1

Am6 would be a minor chord with the 6th scale degree included: ACEF#. This chord occurs naturally in the Dorian Mode and the Ascending Melodic Minor scale. Most commonly I find this chord associated with Dorian. As you may have noticed in other circumstances, chords and other notes used within a piece of music do not have to stay within the key specified. ...


0

That sounds rather confused. Am6 does not contain C#, and the natural A minor mode does not contain an F#. So it is not clear how you derive your rule. Assuming that you base your rule on the melodic minor scale (the only A minor scale actually containing F#), Bm6 is equally "in scale" with melodic A minor as Am6 is.


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A good way is to try and write a simple bassline, and see what sounds good. It's easy to come up with note clusters higher up where the root note is ambiguous, but much harder (but not impossible) to hide from it lower down the pitch scale. Also, make up a melody that fits your chords. Then write a bassline that fits that same melody, and that could point ...


3

Patrx2 and Dom's answers are both very good. To add to them: Usually I determine the root (C or A) taking into account clues like: The happy or sad feel of it all I think Patrx said it quite well, I would add that minor sounds darker to most people than major, but adding meaning and emotional content to the sound is the function of the artist, it ...


3

Check your phrase ends/points of cadence, also your "roof" and "floor" (the successions of highest notes in the treble, lowest notes in the bass). Dom is quite correct that a lot of music doesn't start with the tonic. Starting deceptively has been a valid technique since at least C.P.E. Bach and Joseph Haydn. Establishing a tonality is often an active ...


3

You don't need to start on i or I on any piece of music and one chord alone will never tell you what key you are in. You need more context to actually know what's going on. The rest of the progression will tell you what key you're in especially when you come across dominants chords and cadences. If you encounter a lot of E7 chords I'd expect it to be in A ...


0

I can only speak for my own instrument but I don't think this is unique to guitar. There is definitely some practical considerations specific to instruments as well when considering keys. For instance piano music is relatively open in regards as to key but for guitar you are always wanting to go to the natural guitar keys (E, A and D) Playing guitar music ...


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It is just a small chromatic motif in the melody. It starts with the dominant chord (E Maj) chord and then moves back to the a minor chord where there is several variations in the picking from the a minor chord. It is used somewhat similar to an upbeat.



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