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1

Weighted action.Not as complex as an acoustic piano, but feels close to it, as opposed to a 'switch', more like an organ feel. If one is used to a proper piano feel, it's quite different when using a non-weighted feel. While some digitals have velocity sensitivity, it's not the same as a weighted action, and it's not so effective putting expression into the ...


1

Write the song with the melody BEFORE you worry about what key it's in. I think you'll only limit yourself (box yourself in) if you try to choose a key first (since it sounds like you've mostly learned by ear up to this point, anyways.) Make the song/tune/piece sound good to you first and then you can figure out what key it's in. I've played with some ...


13

I would actually consider this to be ♭III - IV - I in B major, with the ♭III borrowed from the parallel minor key. In fact, with the ♭III chord, it's somewhat similar in character to one of the "Fellowship of the Ring" themes: I - ♭III - I (in your key, that would be Bmaj - Dmaj - Bmaj). It's the first three chords here. Soundtracks aside, this type of ...


4

Not all the chords in a chord progression need to be strictly in the key. The best way to look at this chord progression is a ♭VII - I - V in the key of E major. The D major chord is a chord that exists in E mixolydian (on of the other modes of E) and it is very common for someone playing in the key of E major to borrow it. The E major and B major are ...


1

Honestly, it could fit in several different keys, including C major, C minor, G major. There's not enough data here to tell for sure. At least one of the chords must be borrowed, though, since there is no single key that contains the E natural (in Am and C) and the E flat (in Cm). In order to define a key, you really need a cadence: a dominant-tonic ...


3

Far more often than not, the first full bar of a song contains the key chord. This 'sets the scene' for the listener. and establishes 'home'. In this case, it COULD be in C minor, which then brings the Am into question. This is explained away with the idea of 'parallel key', which gives another set of harmonies to use. As in not only the Cm set - Cm, Fm, ...


4

What I think fits perfectly here is that you are on the G major scale and you borrow a chord from the G minor scale. The chords G major and A minor fit perfectly with the scale and C minor is the 4th chord from the G minor scale. You are allowed to do that and it sound pretty good; it is also pretty common. Here is an example where Elvis uses it: ...


0

@Dom answered this from the perspective of harmony, so I thought I'd complement that with an explanation about melody. There is an old theory of melody (maybe it was in Fux' Gradus ad Parnassum? Don't have time to check) that a melody starts "at rest", then "moves", then "returns to rest". This pattern is generally found on at the level of the musical ...



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