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1

If this is what I have heard described as a palm smear - though I believe it is technically a glissando - I have a couple of strategies to try. If you are playing more informal music (blues, rock and roll, etc.), consider using the palm of your right hand, sweeping across your body ready to hit your destination note with your left, then quickly switching ...


2

If you mean a glissando, I'd recomend using the back of your fingers; hitting the keys with your fingernails. With certain keyboards it has helped me a lot, since you can pressure the keys easier this way, and your fingers will be angled so you probably wont get them stuck.


0

WiFi is unlikely, at least not with regard to radio interference: that's rather weak. Mobile phones, however, are pretty strong in that regard. They don't just need to get through to the next few rooms but half across town. That results in seriously stronger potential for interference.


1

A vacuum cleaner. True story: a friend of mine used to be an organ tuner. So he was there in a church, doing the final intonation of the registers (that's even after the tuning, making sure that all of a register responds in style and consistently) and all the personnel had been notified of the requirements for absolute silence. So he is working on this ...


1

It's possible. David Hirschfelder used to do that with LRB: though he's miming, not playing live in that video. The best way to play a Keytar is to drop it off the top of a tall ...


1

The problem sounds like the MIDI routing is going into a feedback loop. This means the sampler device getting signals from Studiologic, is sending the MIDI data back to the Studiologic. And Studiologic doesn't understand that it is its own signal returning back but thinks that the MIDI signal is coming from another controller. Therefore Studiologic passes it ...


4

I have a tool made just for this: http://www.michalpaszkiewicz.co.uk/chordprogressiontool/ The program is open source too, so you can take the code and do what you like, or improve upon the project itself.


1

This is pretty close, but not exact. This site has a good amount of chords under separate urls. http://classpiano.com/chord-dictionary/ You could send your friend: AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ Bb : http://classpiano.com/b-flat-chord/ Gm : http://classpiano.com/g-m-chord/ Ab : ...


0

For a beginning piano student you can get by with a less expensive digital piano made by Williams, Yamaha or Casio. In order to better translate the feel to a real piano, you will want fully weighted keys that feel more like a real piano. Don't fall for the semi weighted - and touch sensitive is not the same as weighted. Since space is a concern, the ...


2

It is not hard to work out a number of keys when avoiding remembering this by heart. A full piano has: 4 full octaves up from the middle C (C3) 3 full octaves down also from the middle C plus 3 additional keys at left next to C0. An octave (e.g. from C3 to B3) contains 12 keys. The number of keys: 3 extra keys at the left 3 octaves at the left, ...


2

Unfortunately, neither keyboard will respond like a piano. Properly weighted keys are far more important to learning piano than the number of keys. Therefore, if you really must have a keyboard now, go with the one you like the feel of better, and that sounds like the Yamaha. But seriously, if you want something that feels like a piano, then wait a while, ...



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