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3

Repeating the cantus firmus (c.f.) would not have been wrong at all, and it is done a lot. However, there are other options of course: You just play the harmony, i.e., the keyboard plays moreorless only large choords in some proper way, by both hands. The right hand plays another melody that you think out. There are several possibilities: You can play a ...


0

I went from a board with 61 keys to one with 73. It was a vast improvement. I still miss the very lowest keys, not so much the highest octave. Happily I have my old upright at home for when nothing will do but that low A, or Bb. When gigging, I need to stay away from too much bass anyway, so it is not so bad. But if this is your only keyboard, I expect ...


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If you already play classical music surely you can answer this yourself to some extent. How many times do you play keys in the top and bottom octave in the music you've played? Classical music covers a massive range, I think if you were utilising those extremes of pitch you'd probably remember!


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A piano has an orchestral sound imprint and thus is really mostly a solo instrument. With a digital keyboard, the main question you will be facing is what role you play in the context of your band. The principal advantage and disadvantage is that you are the "joker" who can produce any kind of sound. For cover bands imitating a number of originals, this ...


8

An 88 key piano will have a TOTAL of 88 keys. White keys + black keys = 88.


2

Nord's warranty on a $4000 stage 2 HA88 is one year (some purveyors offer +1). It is up to you to determine whether this would have been an economical purchase if it broke after that. Only time will tell and I suggest against buying any hardware that isn't properly vetted. Tried-and-true. My super-cheap 'toy' 25yo Casio SK-5 still works like a champ even ...


3

Certain brands of synth/keyboard are very high quality: Nord, Technique, Kurzweil. These can and do last for years with common-sense care. Sometimes there are internal parts that wear out and need to be replaced, which a qualified keyboard technician can do pretty inexpensively ($100-$200). Perform such "maintenance" regularly and you'll have a keyboard that ...


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On your keyboard, each different voice selection will call for a different technique. If you don't have weighted keys, the piano will feel pretty strange to you, of course. I tend to stay away from acoustic piano on any key board that does not at least approximate a real one. But the pad sounds you reference are a different story. Any organ sound or other ...


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A common failing of excellent piano players who find their way into a band - church bands commonly (which I think is what you mean) - is that they want to play piano. Beautiful, complicated stuff. This has it's place but is not the norm any more than you'd have an electric guitar player soloing all over the place while your acoustic player demonstrates ...


2

I wouldn't know about lifespan of electric pianos, but as for keyboards I remember hearing about a problem with Dave Smith Prophet 08 Pots, so he offered a DIY upgrade kit (which involved soldering). ---link--- I think if something is designed as a signature model / flagship or designed to be a timeless keyboard then a good designer would make it fixable ...


2

Extremely dependent on how much they get played. Imagine an electronic piano (keyboard) that sits in the parlour only to be played on highdays and holidays, compared with the same model being played, say, in a teaching situation, 6/7 days a week. Mechanically the latter will wear out sooner, whereas the former may start to break down (capacitors leak, etc.) ...


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Yes there should be some. Just keep in mind that you always concentrate on the client selection and importance of the ceremony for which you have been hired. For more detail please feel free to take a look at mildjs(dot)com


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Besides weighted action, they can be as well called "hammers", because actually, there is a hammer inside of some of them, for example in this GH3 (image taken from yamaha.jp webpages): GH3 stands for Graded Hammer 3rd generation. The word graded indicates that the keys change a bit from low tones to high ones, which reflects the behaviour of a true ...


1

This is probably most likely to occur if you are stretching your hand, playing notes for apart, then a part of your finger could get stuck under a key, which wouldn't be good fun while playing a piece. However, if you have good piano technique and keep your hands over the keyboard, rather than beyond the end of it, this shouldn't really happen.


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Question 1) I use an 88 key Roland stage piano with midi out when I need it. Stage because it saves space and fairly portable (still 25kg) and have sometimes packed it away in flight case when not being used. Still requires a dedicated space in any room. Question 2) I got fully weighted because its main purpose was to learn how to play classical piano, but ...


2

With a "MIDI keyboard", you are not going to learn the basics of piano but rather of keyboard play. Basically all keyboards that have action seriously suitable for actual piano play also have their own sound generators and more often than not built-in amplifiers. While they may also sport MIDI output, using that is optional and, short of rather high ...


1

The manual says "On 117V models the AC cable is permanently attached to the unit." That would indicate that there are three different models (117V, 230V and 240V) and that if your power cable is permanently connected, you have the 117V model. In this case you will need an external transformer to run this on 220V or 240V. 2:1 ratio will be fine. They are ...


2

I'd go by what is put on the keyboard: the manual might just list the power consumptions for the different various models. Or it might state the current setting and there is a selection switch inside of the case itself. May depends on whether you have an external power supply (which then might need replacing) or an internal one (which has a higher ...


1

The most common way to power busking equipment is to use a deep-cycle marine battery and an inverter for the voltage and current you want to run at. The article below also discusses almost-silent gas-powered generators, which are pricey. If your keyboard takes batteries and doesn't eat them too quickly, then you might consider using rechargeable batteries ...


7

I'm a violinist, not a pianist, but it's very common for beginning violin players to have severe pain because they are too tense, especially when they are self taught. I'm going to suggest a few generic techniques to start minimizing tension. When you sit down at the piano, think about how you are sitting. Look for any tension, especially in your neck and ...


1

Key velocity is a poor replacement for mechanic action since you are missing the tactile feedback. For doing percussion and its ilk, that might work reasonably. But the control will just not be detailed and graded enough for playing simulated piano. So you are probably better off switching key velocity off for piano play or at least reducing the ...


1

Weighted action.Not as complex as an acoustic piano, but feels close to it, as opposed to a 'switch', more like an organ feel. If one is used to a proper piano feel, it's quite different when using a non-weighted feel. While some digitals have velocity sensitivity, it's not the same as a weighted action, and it's not so effective putting expression into the ...


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Your best learning material for this is to find someone who plays this style, asking them to play while you watch and video tape it. Ask them questions if needed. Ask them to break it down. Take the video home, slow it down, watch the keys and learn. There aren't any books I'm aware of for this style, and transcribing albums can be daunting. Best to watch ...



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