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2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


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There's only one way you can learn theory without knowing how to read music: a teacher explains and shows you. So you can get this either with in-person lesson (teacher sitting next to you) or online video lesson. That's it.


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Learning music theory without sight reading is like learning poetry without reading. Sight reading is not essential to music theory, but scores are the written language in which the music theory has been laid down. Now with a guitar, "sight reading" mostly describes a reproductive skill, like being able to recite a text you did not know before. It is not ...


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Yes - I compose orchestral music as a hobby, but I don't play any instruments. So, yes, technically you can learn theory without knowing how to sight read


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Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...


1

Whilst agreeing with most of Shev's answer, I feel that sight reading is a lot more straightforward on a keyboard type instrument.For each note on the stave, there is only one place to play it. Thus it makes more sense, and the 'geography' of a melody is simpler to translate onto the keys. With a guitar, there are sevceral different places to play the same ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


2

Except at the "toy" end of the market, almost any synthesiser or electric piano you can buy today will have MIDI in and out. Reading between the lines, I suppose the challenge you have is that you want a good keyboard, with budget sounds. That may be difficult to find. I would recommend shopping around and basing your shortlist on the mechanical aspects of ...


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Only M-Audio knows why they were discontinued. (I'd guess that they were not able to keep updating their drivers, which were needed because they were using a non-standard protocol.) There are many MIDI keyboards with integrated synthesizer; they are called stage pianos.


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Ok I've figured out an easy way to do this! So here are the notes I'm playing: B, A#, G#, F#, F, D# C# There are two semitone steps here: A# to B and F to F#. So to play on the white keys, A# and F must map to a white key that has no black key to its immediate right. So, via trial and error, you can first map F to E and if that doesn't work you can map it ...


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A synth is a machine that generates (synthesizes) sounds. There are many different types: old-school 80's style FM synthesizers, even more old-school modular synths like Moogs, software synthesizers that run on a computer, etc. Although some have a keyboard, that is not part of a synthesizer per se, that's just the controller. A controller is a thing that ...


2

Here is a chart for you: from G flat or F sharp major go up or down 6 half-steps. from F major go down five half-steps, or up 7. from E major down four half-steps, or up 8. from E flat major down three 1/2 steps, or up 9. from D major down two 1/2 steps, or up 10. from D flat major down one half-step, or up 11. from B major up one half-step, or down 11. ...


4

The buttons Pressing the # key once will move the transposition up half a step (from a white key to a black key, or between two white keys that don't have a black key between them). So from C to E: C#, D, D#, E, that's 4 steps. Quickly recognising the transposition required From the question, it looks like you know about scales and keys. So you probably ...



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