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Yes there is, it's called a computer :-) Like you said, you have an USB MIDI controller. This type of device is designed to be connected to a USB host, i.e. (in general) a computer and used with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) software. However you can install a MIDI (standard) port in your computer connecting also to a USB port. The Roland/Edirol UM-1 ...


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I completely agree with General Nuisance but I just want to add something. Throughout the learning process compose as often as you can. Composition is just like any other craft, mastery comes with experience.Use the music theory you learn and consciously put the various elements into your compositions. The more you write, the better you will get.


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Where to start: music theory classes. It's easy enough to compose little ditties and melodies just one note at a time, but to add harmonies and chords it takes an understanding of music theory. Piano is a great instrument for learning theory because you have all of the notes laid out in front of you, and for the same reason it's good for composing. I ...


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Music has to comes from heart. For this I think musician need a dedicated intense practice and cute listener capability.Then good music can compose.


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MIDI isn't sound, it's just information about when keys were pressed (and some other info). If you're connecting via MIDI then you can't get the on-board sounds. If you want the sound off the keyboard, you need to connect via audio connections.


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If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


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Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


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Electric pianos are (typically) vintage instruments that produce sound in a mechanical way, capturing the sound with an electro-magnetic transducer of some kind (much like the pickups of an electric guitar). The first models of these type of instruments appeared in 40's and 50's and the technology become mainstream in the 60's and 70's with two most ...


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Yes, many old organs were built with only some of the 12 chromatic keys in some octaves (particularly the lowest one, since the biggest pipes are the most expensive ones). The reason is that the more remote chromatic tones were rarely used in compositions of the time, and so this saved a lot of money for only a little inconvenience. The same was also done ...


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I would check out the music courses on udemy.com, especially by Rosa Suen. There are basically two types of music lessons -- one is for classic music which is what many piano teacher teach, but the other is to play by ear. Rosa teaches you how to take a "fun melody" and how to harmonize it on the left hand. Most popular music sheet music shows the melody ...


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Having an actual MIDI output (instead of USB MIDI) is a good thing, because this allows you to connect devices without a PC inbetween. Rack-mount modules (e.g., Motif-Rack XS, Integra-7) are large, and correspondingly costly, but there are also "desktop" modules, such as the Mobile Studio Canvas. It might be cheaper to buy some used, discontinued model ...


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CPE Bach certainly made that assertion about his father, but remember that they both had very limited access to anything except "contemporary music", compared with what is available to anyone today. If you look at any collection of 16th century keyboard music written 50-100 years before JSB), it is full of octave stretches, especially for the left hand. ...


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(Sorry, this was to be a comment continuing on the previous thread, but I wanted to include pictures) This picture was used in a video class I've seen, by Prof. Craig Wright from Yale where he corroborated the perspective that primite (late medieval/early renaissance context) keyboard playing was done without using the thumbs. He also referred to what he ...


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Rumour or hearsay, I think, abetted by C.P.E. Bach. Yes. Evidently Santamaria's Arte de taƱer fantasia from the 16th century gives examples of quick scale passages using the thumb, and also warns about using the thumb on black keys except when paired with an octave. I'm getting this secondhand (Historical Harpsichord Technique: Developing La douceur du ...


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There's no simple and general guideline that I know of, except to use the fingering that works best for you. Of course that's not much help if you don't know where to start. Traditionally, you learn by studying fingered scores from easy pieces and instrument method books. Look for a beginners book with fingering indications, like suggested by Todd, and ...



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