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I will explain below how to record the audio output from your Privia to your computer. But from the question, it appears that your goal is to produce a video, with a separate, clean audio track to go with the video. To do this, you will want to record both the video and audio - (with all the ambient noise and extraneous sounds you want to eliminate), ...


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At the most basic level, to record the direct output from a digital piano, it'll need a line out jack. You'll need to connect to some kind of audio interface on your computer, and then use a DAW (like Audacity, Garage Band, Reaper or others) to record the sound. For home recording, audio interfaces typically take in XLR or 1/8" plugs and connect to a ...


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Weighted action is easier to play as a piano. Unweighted is a great deal lighter to carry to a gig! (I think weighted is worth it!)


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What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


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Hammer action is noisier. Of course it is dwarfed by the sounds you hear, but when you have excellent reason for playing through headphones, that reason might also make light action desirable. Also if your main instrument is not a grand piano but a harmonium or accordion or organ, there is no point in an percussive attack, and it may detract from the fine ...


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If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


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You have to be aware that playing a sample-based keyboard on "overdriven guitar" sound requires different voicing than playing an overdriven guitar. The reason for that is that with a guitar, the overdrive is applied after combining the strings whereas with a sample-based keyboard, the "overdrive" is sampled before combining the strings. As a result, you ...


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I've played in numerous bands and spent years and years perfecting tones and playing style to blend with different guitar parts, or approximate (but not simulate) various lines. I even have a bunch of pretty exact guitar patches when matched with amp sims, just feel like I'm chugging on an SG (I did this in a band without guitars and no one really noticed). ...


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Typically people buy dedicated MIDI controllers because They have more options for transmitting MIDI than a general purpose keyboard with MIDI built in - for example they may be able to do more complicated key splits, send program changes, have a number of controls for transmitting MIDI continuous controllers, and so on. (This is often relevant if you are ...


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I have played and loved playing both a Nord Electro and a Korg SV-1, so I am no detractor of electronic keyboards. However, there is a significant difference, in my view, when playing an acoustic piano - or at least a certain sort of acoustic piano. The sort I mean has two features: acceptable key and pedal action, and pleasing tone. There are many new and ...


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All of the sound energy in a piano comes from your fingers. That requires a certain finger strength and will also provide a lot of opportunity for poignant play and constent articulation that is much less prevalent with typical keyboards, both regarding the keyboard action itself as well as the typical music's tendency to exploit it. A hybrid form would be ...


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In many cases they are the same and in fact I would consider the differences between them to be similar to the differences between an electric and acrostic guitar. The two biggest difference is that keyboards tend to be unweigthed (although keyboards with weighted keys do exist) where in a piano they are always weighted and piano tends to make more use of ...


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The number of keys is not everything. From the product website it is very questionable if CTK-1200 has velocity sensitive keys (nothing is written about) and also looks like it does not have any pedals even between optional parts. Your expression will suffer significantly with such a keyboard regardless of the number of keys. Thinking positively, maybe ...


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Looking at the spec., it appears not. The ports are for headphones out and power in. Lots of keyboards do have extra ports for other things, often assignable. Last part - for playing piano, as opposed to most of the other sounds available, the answer is yes, but probably not as a beginner. After some playing,(maybe a year or so, difficult to say), you'll ...


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I will aim at the original question: How to play things on a shorter keyboard. The positioning of the keys for various sizes of the keybed is the following (click to enlarge): (Note that some 73 or 76 keyboards can be slightly shifted.the) That's how you should position your music on the keyboard. The red key is "the middle C" (I made it C3 here, but it's ...


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It probably depends on the keyboard's expander whether it supports this kind of input. It probably is linked to the "expression" controller or pedal. An obvious candidate for Midi expanders dealing with this kind of input are those which specifically support use with an accordion since reasonably recent accordion midification sets usually include a ...



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