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I would recommend starting with ear training - since as you will discover - hearing intervals, chords, melodic lines, being able to read and write music and understand what you are hearing is the key to it all. This is https://www.iwasdoingallright.com/tools/ear_training/online/ a tool that will help you get started with a daily program Think of music as a ...


1

There used to be a series of records called Music Minus One which released many concerto recordings with only the orchestra. Perhaps a search on "Music Minus One" may help. They are still around: http://digital.musicminusone.com/ The other possibility is to find a stereo recording where the soloist has been fed to both channels equally. The channels can be ...


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You could try a MIDI rendition, there are quite good ones out there, just do a google search. With a MIDI player that allows you instrument selection of muting (VanBasco Karaoke Player is good one and very simple to use), you can mute the harpsichord and play on top. Now, soundwise a MIDI rendition will only be as good as the sounds you have available. The ...


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The current configuration is historically based. Early singing was based on what are now the "white keys" on the piano. Also, in early time, a Bb was added so that the F-B interval (which was considered difficult to sing in tune, compared to other intervals) could be avoided a bit. The early organization (which contemporary music theorists called modes or ...


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So sorry, but you can't. NOTHING in the world sounds like a B-3+Leslie. I have heard ALL the so-called "electronic" and "digital" fakers, and anyone who cannot pick out a fake either is not a musician, has no ear, or simply is uninformed about a real, live B-3+Leslie sound. You might get "close" and that may be good enough for you, but don't fool ...


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If your keyboard has a low action, you probably need to use piano gliss technique rather than an organ technique, otherwise you will end up injured one way or another. On piano, the basic idea is to you the back of a finger or thumb so that the nail protects you from injury, not the flat part of your fingertips or your palm. For the safest results, you need ...


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My tip on learning glissando's is to use a finger glove or soft thin glove, to have a smooth slide that you feel comfortable with. As the technique develops, drop the glove. It comes naturally. Same with playing glissando's on the bass pedals. I love those and my audience is more interested in my feet! Take your shoe off and wear a soft woolen sock.


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Yes there is, it's called a computer :-) Like you said, you have an USB MIDI controller. This type of device is designed to be connected to a USB host, i.e. (in general) a computer and used with a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) software. However you can install a MIDI (standard) port in your computer connecting also to a USB port. The Roland/Edirol UM-1 ...


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MIDI isn't sound, it's just information about when keys were pressed (and some other info). If you're connecting via MIDI then you can't get the on-board sounds. If you want the sound off the keyboard, you need to connect via audio connections.


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


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Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


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Electric pianos are (typically) vintage instruments that produce sound in a mechanical way, capturing the sound with an electro-magnetic transducer of some kind (much like the pickups of an electric guitar). The first models of these type of instruments appeared in 40's and 50's and the technology become mainstream in the 60's and 70's with two most ...



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