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15

Brass have their overall sweet spot around 2 flats, strings about 2 sharps. That's because their layout is based on some natural notes related by pure intervals. Essentially those you can play while leaving valves or fingerboard alone. In contrast, many woodwinds have a sort of "piano keyboard" with the difficulty being more or less that of working with ...


9

I've been playing trombone for a while and I think I'm fairly well positioned to answer some of your points: They will often say that the piece we are playing is too hard due to relatively basic rhythms... The effort needed to articulate a distinct note is greater on a larger instrument - this complicates playing complex rhythms, as the end of one note ...


8

Make or buy yourself some flash cards for bass clef notes. Begin with a very small subset of cards -- choose several that you can identify reliably, such as middle C. If you have, say, 3 easy cards and 2 slightly harder cards, that's a good combination. On the back of the card, write the name of the note. Now shuffle and quiz yourself. Say the names of ...


8

I think that a well-rounded guitarist should use both. Regarding negative effects, my answer is no, provided that you continue to occasionally go back and practice the other style. For example, if you've been using a pick for a long time, and then decide to play fingerstyle for an extended period of time, don't hesitate to go back to using a pick every ...


8

The amount of air that a flautist is moving and a lower brass player is moving are substantially different. It's much quicker to articulate on a flute. Also, you have to barely move your fingers to change notes, where brass has to move the full height of the piston. When it comes to knowing the fingering, flutes look up a flute fingering chart, and they're ...


5

Chances are you took lessons on oboe and flute. Assuming you did, and the teachers were good, you would have appreciated their input. If not, you'll never know! Included in lots of the answers on this site is the phrase 'get yourself a teacher!'. And not always written by teachers!! Your worry about picking up bad habits will be allayed by having a ...


5

I doubt that what you are attempting could be possible in the amount of time you have. You should start calling up every piano teacher you can find, and keep going despite their rejections and see if you can find one teacher willing to teach you. Very few if any teachers will be willing to take on a student to learn to play "just one song", considering ...


4

Shift your perception down by one whole line/space. C below the treble clef is one line below the clef; C below the bass clef is two. High F is the top line of the treble clef; the top F of the bass clef is the second-from-top line. C on the treble clef is the space above the middle line; C on the bass clef is the space below the middle line... and so forth. ...


4

There are a couple of factors here. Some instruments are similar, but vary in terms of their technical difficulty For example, if you were to compare the flute, clarinet, oboe, and bassoon, the flute has the least amount of variation between registers, required alternate fingerings, and keys in general. The clarinet has more keys, different fingerings ...


3

Your preeducation will mean that you can work with a teacher much more effectively since you'll be focusing mostly on piano playing mechanics rather than general music. After a few lessons, you might be able to cut down the frequency and still get frequent enough input to make a decisive difference. So in effect, you get quite better value out of a (good) ...


3

I've played both piano and bass guitar, and what helps me is a bit of transposition. Find a tune that you can play on your right hand, in treble clef, well. Make sure it's something you could stand to listen to like 100 more times. Using a blank staff (lines on a piece of notebook paper work fine), transpose that line into bass clef. A G in treble clef ...


3

There simply is no easy way about it. You begin at your entry points (as I like to call them) F being on the second line from top and G being on the bottom line on the staff. You may also find it useful to write the letters A-B-C-D-E-F-G out on your answer book. You have notes on lines and in spaces and when you go down on the staff you count backwards and ...


3

First of all I want to say that I am very sorry about the loss of your Dad. And your ambition to learn to play this song in honor of your Dad is very noble indeed and I truly admire and respect what you are hoping to accomplish. I know he would be honored to know you were willing to even think about learning to do this for him. The piano teachers will ...


3

This is something that will improve with time, but you should practice regularly if you want to improve it faster. Even a few minutes a day only spent reading bass clef (not playing the piano) should be enough. If you’re taking public transportation, this is a great place to practice. The restroom is a good place as well.


3

Playing with your fingers allows you to play multiple notes on distant strings at precisely the same time and to play cross rhythms with ease. It is, on the other hand, a lot easier to learn to use a plectrum and it is especially much easier to learn to play fast using plectrums. There are no negative effects with learning to use one. They are different ...


2

When I was in college, I helped a few people with learning to read new clefs. One tuba especially really needed help with treble clef. Know that whatever method works for you to learn it, eventually you become fluent and the method disappears, much like it did with treble clef. As you guessed, what you need is exposure to more bass clef and you'll be able ...


2

I'm a guitar player, so naturally I learned the treble clef first, and only much later did I need to learn the bass clef. I remember what helped me a lot then. It is maybe trivial and all too obvious, but as a pure visual help I imagined that the notes stay where they are (with respect to the treble clef) and that the lines shift up by one. I.e., I tried to ...


1

Get a book of songs in whatever style/genre you like, transposed for bass/baritone. Best is if the book contains some songs you know well and some you don't. Every day choose a song and spend some time sight-singing. Sight-singing creates strong connections in your brain; I really think it's the best method.


1

It helped me to write notes on an empty stave. Perhaps you could start with scales in different keys up to let's say three sharps, three flats. When you feel comfortable, try to write chord progression, e.g. tonic, subdominant, and dominant (I, IV, V) in those keys and then try different variations. Another popular chord progression is II, V and I. This will ...


1

Practice sight-reading a single line on the bass clef on its own. You can find plenty of music for cello, bassoon, songs for bass voice, etc, to download from http://imslp.org/. I started as a keyboard player, and The way I taught myself to read "less common" clefs, like C clefs on any line of the stave in old vocal scores was to focus on just a few ...


1

I would advise you to first master one type of picking technique before you go on to another. It takes years and many hundreds of hours of practice to truly master the picking technique so if you are constantly changing between the two you risk becoming a jack of all trades and a master of none. Main difference is the amount of notes you can play together ...


1

Using simple examples, just as Michal has never seen 'Recuerdos de la Alhambra' performed with a plectrum, I have never seen 'Tumeni notes' performed finger style. I can't say either is impossible but then, neither is moving Scafell Pike with a soup spoon - how much time do you have to work on it? There are no negative effects of trying either provided you ...


1

Some of this answer will address your original question before all the edits. Learning to play the guitar is very rewarding, but the rewards come slowly in the beginning and require dedication, persistence, and commitment (and pain tolerance). One thing that has become abundantly clear to me after many years of playing guitar, is that no matter how much ...


1

It is important to note the differences in attack, as well, that are available. Though it is a generalization that master players mitigate through careful technique, use of a plectrum usually introduces an attack with a different sound profile than the attack one hears from finger picking. Of course there is is continuous spectrum of softness to harshness ...


1

No MIDI input, but I found DrumSchool a great way to learn. It has basic patterns, fills, adjustable speed, scrolling notes. There are also embedded videos that helped learn read the drum tabs in the beginning. -Alx



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