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6

It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


6

Every symphony ever written has more than one key -- usually several different keys. A symphony may have the name of a certain key in its title, but this only refers to the main key that occurs throughout its structure. Each symphony will have many changes to different keys. Each symphony will tend to be unique in how it uses multiple keys. Different ...


3

I'm going to jump in with a startling admonition ... you've made the wrong choice! Learn the scale first :-) And here is WHY ... Western harmony is scale based and chords are triads, or tertian chords, based on the scales. In addition, the naming of chords generally (but not always) refers to the scale (e.g "C6", "CMaj7", etc.). Now, this might seem a ...


3

Playing with a metronome can be a challenge but can help tremendously with achieving proper timing when playing a musical piece as well as refining your ability to maintain the overall tempo throughout the song. I find that the digital metronomes that allow you to choose from a large number of different beats where you can have the accent beat where it ...


2

I would say scales are easier and chords are just different. It's almost like learning the same chords in a different position on the neck of the guitar that you've never learned before because that "position" doesn't even exist on guitar. It's also only four courses so it's a bit simplified. For example, an open G major chord is easy on mandolin: It's 0 0 2 ...


1

This is actually not a simple question, but neither do the answers give an accurate picture of historical practice during the common practice period. The Beethoven Fifth is a good example: we regard it as a "C-minor symphony" because its first movement is in C minor. Within that movement, C minor is, as we often say, the tonal center: it's the key to which ...


1

A composition like "Symphony in C minor" refers to a key in the piece, with which key the composition starts and with which it ends. There is a certain number of notes and chords in that key, so if a whole composition was built only on that key, it would sound repetitive. That's why during the composition changes keys. Usually it's more than one, but it ...


1

Having spoken to a guitarist I work with who planted a mandolin neck onto his acoustic guitar complete with bridge and soundhole, and pup, (it works really well with both!) he said that he thinks of each as a separate instrument. Guitar chord shapes belong to one set, mandolin shapes to another, and the twain never meets. So, just like learning a new guitar ...


1

Since you said that you're having trouble with the off beats, you can set the metronome to count the off beats (instead of quarter notes) to make sure you are playing them correctly. For example, if you are playing a passage with 16th notes, then have the metronome click 16th notes so that each click matches up with a note you are playing. If your piece ...


1

Best way to learn chords is to pick about 20-30 simple, well known tunes: folk tunes, Christmas carols, children's tunes. Working entirely in the key of C major, work out the melody, and then figure out which of the seven basic chords (in that key) should go under the melody note at any given time. In other words, harmonize the melody by ear. This ...



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