Hot answers tagged

17

Depends on what you mean by "may be able". Different instruments and music styles and instruments and practice material pose different hurdles and motivation for different people. That's not specific to playing music but any skill. The less discipline you have, the more you are dependent on upcoming hurdles and short-time rewards matching your current ...


9

If you have the drive and dedication to get over the initial awkward and difficult learning curve then I don't see why you can't play any instrument you want. When I first started guitar at the age of 15 I played for probably about 3 weeks or so and then "quit" because I was getting so frustrated and felt like I'd never be able to get it. After about 3 ...


5

All of the below assumes whatever you do will involve daily practice (at least half an hour but an hour is better) and study (of resources on how to play). You don't need a teacher to learn harmonica but if guitar is your first instrument then a teacher is highly recommended, and for violin almost everyone needs a good teacher to succeed. A diatonic ...


3

You should really base your choice of what to learn based on which one you most like rather than which one is easiest. In truth, no instrument is easier than any other when played at the highest level of musicianship, just some instruments are easier to get started on than others. Violin and guitar are fully chromatic instruments meaning that every note is ...


3

The way I approach polyrhythms is this: I break them down much as you do, in terms of their lowest common denominator, but I try to memorize the sound of the pattern right away and not rely on seeing it graphically. At UC we learned an example for two against three: "FARMS in BERkeley". I then practice it in many different ways- tapping the two parts with ...


3

You played piano for a fairly extensive length of time, and reached a fairly high level of playing (Inventions aren't the easiest thing to play), so you would probably jump back into it fairly quickly. The muscle memory from playing never completely disappears, so with consistent (and productive) practice, you could easily reach the skill level you were at, ...


2

It's hard to say for your specific case, but it only took me about six months to get back to where I was when I went back to classical piano, and I didn't have a teacher when I came back to it, and I had a longer break. I think you'll find the skills come back very fast, but not the stamina. So you have to hold back and slowly build up how long you play ...


2

The duration of the beat is set by the tempo marking, usually an italian word like lento, andante, vivace, etc. that you may have noticed at the beginning of musical scores. These words correspond to an approximate setting of beats per minute (bpm), that you find for example in wikipedia and is usually also marked on the scales of metronomes. But the ...


2

While most answers bring valuable assessments, I would also add the fact that you need to accomodate with the instrument you want to play. Piano players think their instrument differently than guitarist do, same for drums players. So, added to the fact that you must build up your skill, supposedly try to get a teacher or understanding how instrument works, ...


2

There are two basic hurdles to learning a new instrument - the theory, and the technique. For someone who is competent at one instrument, it shouldn't be hard for them to pick up the theory of playing a different one. However, different instruments have different technique challenges. Piano and guitar are relatively simple - it's just a question of where to ...


2

The difference is that while tapping out the beats, you're supposed to sing a note—any note—on the beats that have the line over them, and not sing on the beats that don't. You're supposed to sing a single note, and that note is supposed to last the length of the beats that have the line above them. In other words, you tap or clap out a steady beat, and for ...


1

Well since there is no "trick" to correcting wrong technique from one day to another (especially if you have been doing it for 5 years) I'd say this is going to be a matter of a lot of practice and concentration. Every time you pick up the guitar and play you should actively focus on how you are holding it and only play with the correct technique from now ...


1

I can understand and relate to your frustration. My mother was an accomplished pianist and taught piano. But when she tried guitar, she gave up quickly. She kept the guitar and so growing up I had access to both instruments. I became enamoured with guitar after starting on piano so I have experience learning both. The good news is that if you really ...


1

Barring physical disability, anyone CAN play any instrument. The easier Bach Inventions are regularly set for Grade 5 examinations, so in 6/7 years, regularly prodded by a teacher but not practicing much, you made rather less than average progress. This indicates a degree of talent, I suppose! Are you taking guitar lessons, or trying to teach yourself?


1

One beat is as long as the composer says it will be. Usually signified at the beginning of a piece with 'bpm', This stands for beats per minute, so if it stated 60bpm, there would be one beat every second.A tune twice as fast would be 120bpm. No-one actually times abeats per se, but instead would use a metronome to set the speed of the piece.It's also very ...


1

I learned to recognize intervals by associating each of them with a different melody. For example: Minor second - Jaws theme Major second - Do Re Mi Minor third - Greensleeves Major third - For He's the Jolly Good Fellow Perfect fourth - Yankee Doodle Augmented fourth - The Simpsons Theme Perfect fifth - Star Wars theme Minor sixth - Love Story ...


1

should I read the score without even touching the piano? Definitely. Sports coaches use the term "visualization". If you can't imagine "inside your head" what you are trying to achieve, most likely you won't achieve it. You don't need to be sitting in front of a piano (or a cello) to do the thinking. should I try and play the whole thing even if I ...


1

After learning the basics of playing the piano, you can do a shortcut since you are basically only interested in playing popular songs. On udemy.com there are several courses on harmony and improvisation. You learn a standard set of harmonies for the left hand which can be played for any melody. It is simple to learn. You might check out the "Learn ...



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