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4

The answer is to learn both. They are not exclusive of each other, and as you say, you're going to learn both eventually anyway. Both require development of your music reading skills. Spending time on the one will not detract from the study of the other. Virtually all advanced, university-level music programs require the student to have fundamental basic ...


4

At the end of the day they are all the same scales just the application to learn them is different. Every system has it's own uses and reasons. The CAGED system gets you to focus on how the different barre chords you play and the pentatonic scales they are related to line up. The sweeping patterns is thinking of the scales in terms of the sweeping lead ...


2

To play from C6 upwards, you don't need to "power" your way through it. Instead, think of a garden hose. The more you cover the end with your thumb, the faster the water comes out. To play that third octave comfortably, you'll need to use a very concise aperture and a lot of fast-moving, concentrated air. Think about it like this: The tone hole of the ...


2

I searched out this topic to see if it is indeed a labeled phenomenon. I don't necessarily walk away from the instrument, but from some new, difficult pieces. When I come back to them a week or two later, several of my previous "sticking" places in the music have miraculously worked themselves out. I honestly believe it has something to do with hearing ...


2

You could think about how you use the guitar most, if you mostly play to accompany yourself singing, the piano may be a better choice. If you treat the guitar as a solo (melodic) instrument, or regularly have other musicians to play with, the violin may be a better choice. For what it's worth, playing the piano develops and uses a lot more transferable ...


2

You are right. Guitar method books don't teach much traditional music theory. This is because the guitar is not an ideal instrument upon which to learn music theory. Traditional Western music theory, as it is taught in colleges, is based around choral music. You learn to read and analyze choral music, and later to arrange and write your own chord ...


1

You can go to a music shop that is well stocked with sheet music, method books, etc., and ask them to point you to the music theory workbooks section. Pick out Volume 1 of each series (all the major publishing houses have such a series), take them over to a comfortable chair, and choose one that appeals to you. Please don't be put off by the small amount ...


1

Get a teacher. Nice and simple. One with a college degree where he or she did at least four years of theory studies. Ask him or her what kind of melody and harmony work he or she did. If he or she can write fugues and has a good knowledge on counter point then he or she would get you far. Just remember that for every 10 practical teachers there may be one ...


1

Well, don't fool yourself: violin is difficult. But... Personal experience: I was (at the age of 15) in a similar situation as you are now. Knew guitar, wanted to learn something more classical. I tried violin. And tried. And failed. Actually I didn't try that long, nor did I take professional lessons. But I really couldn't see it going anywhere. The ...


1

Yes, humming is melodic -- one note at a time (for most people). You may easily develop a "linear" style of sliding up and down a single string for your melody. Depending upon the range of notes, you may have to switch strings. Overall, a sliding "linear" approach is very straightforward. In time, the other strings are there to support harmonic playing -- ...


1

It's not easy 'remembering how each string sounds at each fret'. In fact, that's not a lot to do with learning to play guitar - or any instrument. You may find that RECOGNISING the sound of open strings will be helpful as well as being able to tell if one note is higher/lower, a bit/lot higher than another. As the first answer says, if you can hum, you can ...


1

I've upvoted Slim's answer but I just wanted to add something: Etiquette. You haven't mentioend the instruments involved but if it's a setup where there's no notion of a "stage" reuiqred to play - eg acoustic guitar / woodwind etc can just play where standing - then I can see that anarchy could easily prevail. One handy thing about an electric jam (drums ...



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