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7

It's a bit of all sorts. Finger/hand strength and mobility are important, and will improve with more playing.Some new chords will require adaptations of existing fingerings, such as putting a pinky down as a changed note in a barre chord for a 6th or 7th. Thus, they're easy to learn. Sometimes, one finger needs to be flat across 2 or 3 strings, whilst the ...


6

If I'm not mistaken, you don't count every single note, because they are really fast and it would be really tough. Instead, you break them in groups of two. You count them as you would count 16th notes (semiquavers), but with two beats on each hit: Image source Another video which states the same: 1 e and a, but two ...


3

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when ...


2

The question is quite broad, however here are some tips: Familiarize yourself entirely with scales and arpeggios. As boring as it sounds, it is incredibly important to know your way around a piano. Don't just familiarize yourself with major scales, work with natural, harmonic, and melodic minor, and even the blues scales! It is also a good idea to work ...


1

If you want your kids to practice a lot, it would probably be best to get an acoustic piano, and then transcribe into piano role on your computer (I use FL Studio, so using piano roll w/ mouse and keyboard is very easy, and I recommend it). Now, if you really want to play directly from piano to computer, I know there are electric pianos that can easily be ...


1

Good questions! Well Lets do it step by step; 1- You do not have to know if you are singing is a G or Ab, it doesn't matter, if you can transpose thats enough... 2- About knowing if it is W (first note) or WHWWWH... hum well this is not too important but is more than your first question, lets say you want to know if you are sing a melody (a motive) based on ...


1

Q1. Probably a better scale shape to learn and use will be (for example) the one in A that encompasses the 4th to 7th frets, starting on the fat string, 5th fret. It's good as it means you can play two whole octaves, without a hand position shift. Most songs will fit into that, and it's moveable down to key F, and up as far as your hand will reach. You can ...


1

1- I really don't understand this question. But it sounds like you need to work on memorizing/understanding the fretboard. 2- Keep four fingers in a single position and learn a scale (CAGED or otherwise) then focus on connecting scales to stay in a single key up and down the fretboard. Then, especially for guitar and play-along, learn your modes. Between ...


1

Try to get hold of some easy piano tutors, even very simple ones for children, perhaps. There are also some very easy pieces by serious composers you might look at. When I started, as a mature learner, one of the things I used at the start was book 1 of Bartok's Mikrokosmos. The first pieces are very simple with both hands playing in parallel one or two ...


1

I looked up "bass clef quiz" and found a number of good hits. No doubt some of these links will be broken before long, but hopefully that query will find new ones by then :) http://www.studybass.com/tools/bass-clef-notes/ http://notationtraining.com/bass-clef-practice Edit: I just created one of my own. http://bassclef.info/



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