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13

This is a question without a single, solve-everything answer. There are a number of different approaches you can take, and different people will have their own preferences. Fake it. This works well in some traditional music, bluegrass, rock, or jazz, where a certain amount of improvisation is expected of a musician. With a song you haven’t played in ...


12

Leaning basic theory will always help a player regardless of instrument because there are general patterns in music that are prevalent including scales, chords, and progressions. The ability to recognize these common patters will allow you to group songs that utilize these patterns to aid in memorizing songs because instead of remembering a group of notes or ...


8

You can't tell for certain either which key this is in, or which chords would appear above these bass notes, but for different reasons... This short excerpt of music has only four pitches: E, D, F# and G - these notes are found in the scales of several keys: G Major and its relative minor E Minor (natural minor) have these notes: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D D ...


8

You're not breaking any unwritten rules here. It is in fact pretty common to use the 5th of the chord leading up to the root a fourth higher in the bass. However, in your bassline the question is if you really mean an A minor chord in the last bar. If you hear an A minor chord over both bars in the bottom line then - by definition - that's the way it is ...


7

Simple: don't try to "learn new stuff constantly". If you want to gain proficiency at pieces you already know, and you don't want to forget them, you must practice them and that in turn entails making the time to do so. That is time that you cannot spend learning new stuff. I'd say this comes down to learning patience.


6

It depends on the individual, but I'm going to talk about my own experience. Two things to note: It's not really true that each hand is doing something different. Both hands are working together to create a piece of music. Although at first glance it's "special" to have one hand playing one aspect of a piece while the other hand plays a different aspect ...


5

How you describe the harmony (chords) at a point such as the beginning of bar 4, depends upon what any chord symbols are going to be used for. There are in fact several ways to notate the passage you're describing. (For this answer I'm assuming that you do indeed want an Am chord sounding with all the bass notes in bars 3-4). Here are some options: if you ...


4

Learning the notes on any staff is a lot of memorization at first. There are a lot of little tricks to remember what each line and space is on the staff, but it can be a lot to learn at once. I've taught a few younger kids how to read the treble and bass clef (not any teenagers though) and while FACE and Every Good Boy Does Fine helps some it confuses ...


3

I assume that this person already understands the stave and can, slowly and methodically, translate between a stave position, a note name, and its position on an instrument (that is, which key to play, which fret to hold, etc. depending on the instrument). I assume this because they're simple concepts. What he needs is practice; and to encourage him to ...


3

You could work at recognising the chords in your piano pieces too, if you find that easier. I think that's kind of the key, understanding the music rather than just memorising it - knowing where it's going. Professional players seem able to play just about anything they know - but they aren't playing it note-perfect, they can work out from how the song goes ...


2

With a "MIDI keyboard", you are not going to learn the basics of piano but rather of keyboard play. Basically all keyboards that have action seriously suitable for actual piano play also have their own sound generators and more often than not built-in amplifiers. While they may also sport MIDI output, using that is optional and, short of rather high ...


2

I'm learning oud since 5 months now. I don't have any experience with banjo, but sitar (from Indian Classical Music). To address your questions, in my opinion, oud is a bit easier than sitar, but probably more difficult than other instruments, specifically for getting the right intonation (and we're speaking microtonally). As always, the more you practice, ...


2

A certain amount of "forgetting" is normal when you don't play a piece very often. Usually you can refresh a piece that has been memorized with much less practice than it took to initially learn it. You may want to start thinking in terms of what your personal repertoire is. Whatever those initial (pick a number) favorite tunes are, make sure to ...


2

On a digital audio recorder (or equivalent), record the melody only for the song. Do this for each song in your set list. When you practice a song, playback the melody first on the recording. Then harmonize it (fit the chords to it in both hands). Do this by ear. Repeat periodically with random tunes out of your set list, until you are able to play and ...


1

I gather that we are talking about practicing. I think it is good that you notice these issues. There is another can of worms to bring up, that sometimes it is good to separate your left hand and right hand practice on the guitar, depending on what you are trying to achieve.... Experience guides guitarists to recognize tricks that often aid the performance ...


1

Thoughts from a drummer who can't read notes anyway... Practice, practice, practice... Ideally with someone else. This will turn practicing into a performance. You will play better knowing someone else is listening; being more critical of yourself. Recording can be used to substitute the mental heightening the 'listening' of another player causes, though ...


1

Not entirely sure what question you're asking, but any octave for a bass note will work. When you're on, say, Am, then frequently the bassist will be playing any of the notes which constitute that chord :A,C and/or E. Certainly at the 1st and 3rd beats of a 4/4 bar - the strongest, usually. The last beat or half beat may stray so that it points to the first ...


1

I think it depends on how you learn a piece. Sometimes you might learn a piece by learning all the particular movements related to each other. Playing these and these notes on these beats and so on. However, most of the time, pianists will learn one hand, then the other. Ultimately they will try to learn one well enough, so playing that part almost ...



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