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8

Well, "non-reed" eliminates most of the woodwind family, leaving only the flute family. Recorder is pretty easy. There's a reason it's the instrument of choice for elementary school music programs. It takes zero embouchure (mouth position/strength) and almost no air support--you pretty much just blow into it gently and it works. Other recorder-like ...


5

The unfortunate thing about singing is that you can do your voice and yourself damage if your technique is wrong or you over exert yourself. It's for this reason that I would say getting personal feedback is a top priority; however this doesn't mean you need to shell out hundreds on a face to face teacher. you can: Join some singing forums Sign up to ...


4

Irish whistle (aka pennywhistle aka tin whistle) is not only the easiest to learn, it's also the probably the only musical instrument in the world where you can get a professional level instrument for around US$20. A great starter site for Irish whistle is Chiff and Fipple.


4

I think that starting with C and G chords is a throwback from other instruments, particularly the piano, so things could be learnt easily on the 'white keys'. There are none on a guitar, and initially sharps and flats don't need mentioning. Changing from C to G (and vice versa) involve a big change or finger/hand/arm movement with open chords. Not easy or ...


3

Instead of C/G/D I'd probably start them with Am7, Em, Em7 and CMaj7. They offer interesting sounding chords, are absolutely simple to play and in the case of Am7 and CMaj7, you can transition directly to C and show them the relationship and why one finger makes all the difference. Once they get C, transition to G and so on. If it were me, I'd also start ...


3

There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


3

My suggestion would be to work on singing from your center - using your diaphragm. While it will be nice to hone the edge of the tool (fine-tuning the pitch of your voice), you must first shape the tool into its form. Once you are able to effectively sing from your center, I think you will find that your range will be defined by how you sing when you are ...


3

Scotland the Brave is relatively simple, but if you find it tricky to play both hands, starting with simpler music is a good idea. Generally you would start with single hand practice, left and right, learning simple scales individually, then together, and working up to more complex figures. Once you have note placement, chords can come later. This is best ...


2

I'm going to bet the recorder fits this bill.


2

This question will probably get closed soon but the song is "Life in Technicolours"


1

When teaching students traditional guitar chords I would start with Em to Am. Students have issues starting on the C chord because of the stretch with the third finger on fifth string. Using Em with second and third fingers to Am, using same fingers and adding the first on the second string first fret, I see more success introducing chords. Use C Major ...


1

My advice to this: play with what you want and what feels good to you! Take other's advice, but do your thing with it. If you want 17 guitars, go ahead, buy 17 guitars. As long as it feels good to yourself! So , if you really want to keep the guitar: keep it! If you want to sell it, sell it! I wouldn't sell it because it wouldn't bring you that much money ...



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