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5

All of the below assumes whatever you do will involve daily practice (at least half an hour but an hour is better) and study (of resources on how to play). You don't need a teacher to learn harmonica but if guitar is your first instrument then a teacher is highly recommended, and for violin almost everyone needs a good teacher to succeed. A diatonic ...


3

It's going to vary, and you have to remember that there are also a lot of pros that learned by listening and copying what they heard on records without learning to read music. Notes can be known "personally" and this includes knowing all the various chords and scales as they relate to them. There may be no names or functions involved--I think of it as a kind ...


3

You should really base your choice of what to learn based on which one you most like rather than which one is easiest. In truth, no instrument is easier than any other when played at the highest level of musicianship, just some instruments are easier to get started on than others. Violin and guitar are fully chromatic instruments meaning that every note is ...


2

As a guitar player, I learned notes by shapes and positions. The same note can sound in various places on a guitar so guitar players learn to find sweet spots on the guitar where a particular melody can be played without shifting position too much. Which shapes? The standard set of shapes are found in the CAGED system but I found that a little too ...


2

Because music is an abstract language, I'm not sure your question can be answered easily or in any of the ways you described. For me, it's a combination of my mental image of the notes on the staff, vague mental image of those notes on the keyboard, and muscle memory of how both images are supposed to sound and feel. I don't know that I consciously think of ...


1

Someone asked me to convert and elaborate a comment to an answer, so here goes: I believe that once a level of mastery (being a 'professional', as was termed in the question) is obtained there isn't much thought really, more just expression. To explain, asking someone what they are thinking about when they are talking in a native language would likely ...


1

Previous to learning scales, for me it was very much hit or miss. Certain notes following each other became familiar, rather like using the same few words in several sentences. When I knew scales, it changed rather. Listening to a piece, a key is established, the sort of scale used is recognised, and the fingers (usually) tend to follow the tune ...


1

Well since there is no "trick" to correcting wrong technique from one day to another (especially if you have been doing it for 5 years) I'd say this is going to be a matter of a lot of practice and concentration. Every time you pick up the guitar and play you should actively focus on how you are holding it and only play with the correct technique from now ...


1

From my own experience (I've been separated from the piano for 5 years), you'll need one or two months to fully recover. That is something which has stayed in your brain and muscles. As Czerny said : "One should never have to relearn (technique, especially, EdN) what he already had". Now, I'd say it's even better to step away, from times to times, and ...


1

Considering your prior level (Inventions, Fur Elise, etc.), prior amount of practice per week (3 hours), amount of time off (4 years), and current age (17?), you should not have any difficulty picking right back up almost within the first month, maybe even 1-2 weeks. Find a good teacher, listen to that teacher, and enjoy. I promise you that what you're doing ...



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