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There's a boogie pattern 1-3-5-6-b7-6-5-3- used for 12 bar blues. Walking bass patterns (usually on each beat) use all the notes from the scale of the key you're in,- you can use any order, preferably starting a bar with the root note. Theory says that there's a good chance one or two of the other notes in the bar will fit the chord, even random notes ! But ...


4

Interesting - there is a 'top down' for guitar music. I'm thinking of popular guitar tunes, rather than classical guitar. People who self-teach generally start off learning chord shapes which will enable you to strum your way through a song. A lot of guitar tutorials work this way. You can also learn "basic" chords which will work, and add more intricacy ...


2

I once asked a famous violinist this same question, and this is what he said to me: If you only learn the technique for a certain piece, you need to begin anew with every piece that you learn. If you achieve technical mastery before the music, learning the piece becomes a matter of applying your technique. All that said, it's not fun drilling etudes for ...


2

There is no need to train on exercises only. My piano teacher gives real songs and exercises in somewhat 50 : 50 % proportion. Many really nice piano pieces like "Love me Tender" or "Jingle Bells" or "Let it Be" melody line are actually not so difficult to play. There is no lack in "easy piano" books with adapted, simplified versions of really great, real ...


2

Just a few notes: What Tim describes as "a boogie pattern" some people call the money-walk and it varies slightly, sometimes walking half-steps up and down from the 3rd to the 5th and occasionally touching on the flattened 5th. Play around with this one, it's (over)used in 50s and 60s rock quite a bit. A common country bass-line (some call it the eat-shit ...



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