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30

Computer: You're using one right now. You don't need a fancy new computer to make music. DAW: There are many free DAWs. REAPer is free if you don't mind a nag screen, Audacity is free and open source. Keyboard/Synth: You can get an entry keyboard for $100 that will work fine. VSTs: There are many free VSTs available from plenty of websites. Samples: Free on ...


29

Get a teacher Try another instrument Try some different styles of music Play with others Make a deadline to perfect a tune Go to an open-mic night Record yourself playing Change the practice regime - 10 mins max Learn something challenging Use the syllabus for an exam - and take it! Don't give up. It may only be a phase


20

It doesn't need to be expensive. Computer: You don't need an expensive system, and chances are that the one you are using right now is more than enough. I have used a 2GB RAM, 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo system for production (including mixing). The more powerful your system is, the bigger your real-time toolbox is: more channels, more effects, more programs, ...


17

I would say that the last paragraph of your question is closer to the truth. I wouldn't consider knowing the names and shapes of some chords as knowing theory. I know for a fact that people can play very well with little to no theoretical knowledge, since I have friends with this ability. Theory wasn't there before music, theory is a tool to understand and ...


14

If the only reason you want to learn piano is for ONE song at your wedding, I'd say don't go down that road. A non-sucky wedding song is usually at least intermediate level. Pay someone to do it right. Then learn the piano later if you're up for the amount of time and money that takes. Are you going to be ABLE to practice for several hours a week? Are ...


13

Yes. They might be brash and full of bravado, but they will see the long term effects when they age. They will not be able to play for as long during their lifetime as they would if they were healthy. Quite simply: Wind instruments need wind. Smoking inhibits your ability to create wind. Therefore, reduced wind production reduces tone production, ...


13

One last update. The question as I understand it has numerous nested questions: "...if this statement can ever make sense: "X didn't / doesn't know any music theory and is one of the all time greats..." "...is the above statement really saying that these guitarist essentially make up chords as they go along based upon intuition and ear alone?" "...Is ...


12

There is a shortcut, yes. The secret is to practice smart. I used to tell my students there is a difference between practicing and playing; between cleaning up all the difficulties and going into the small details, and playing just for fun or for others. The more time you spend in cleaning grey zones, being careful with sound quality, with fast exercises ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


11

As the horn section you met has demonstrated - smoking and brass playing are not completely incompatible. People can play brass, and play well, despite smoking, at least for a period. Smoking definitely damages your ability to breathe; it reduces lung capacity; it stiffens lung tissue; it narrows breathing passages; it causes excess mucus; it reduces blood ...


11

All F's should be sharp unless they have accidentals.


11

Definitely. For one thing it's much easier to memorise a piece if you understand the theory behind it. Imagine memorising a seemingly random sequence of letters. Now imagine how much easier it is to memorise a poem, because you know how the letters fit together to make words, the words go together to make lines, the lines have a rhythm, some of the words ...


10

Walking away from something and letting it "marinade" is a learning technique known as incubation. When conscious, incubation occurs in the sub-conscious mind where your brain will continue to essentially run series of diagnostic tests addressing the problem it has been presented with. When sleeping, incubation occurs in the unconscious mind, and some ...


10

Expensive compared to what? If you looked at learning sax, guitar, piano etc., and bought new, as you appear determined to do, you would shell out a load of money with those.Especially electric guitar, because you would feel you need a decent amp., then effects, et al. When you learned to ride a bike, you hopefully didn't go and buy a $3000 racing road ...


10

There are several services on the internet which can help you with that. If you have access to a recording of the song If you have access to a recording of the song and a smartphone, Shazam can help you. It’s a service which helps you identify a song by computing a “fingerprint” from the sounds it record. To use the service, you need to download their app ...


10

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to achieve all of your goals within a year - they are a perfectly reasonable. 1.5hrs of practice a day is a typical average of many college musicians, but I digress. Let me address your questions directly: Is it possible, within my barriers, to achieve my goals? What would a weekday excercise (1.5 hours) look ...


10

Your best bet is to take a few piano lessons. Many piano teachers give their classes at their own place, on their own piano. It may be a fairly expensive option, but I am sure you can find a teacher who will give you a few sneaky lessons and teach you just that one song. But then again, I hope for you that this song isn't anything difficult. :)


10

I would venture that you're doing it correctly, and that it takes awhile. I was still reaching new levels of mastery over the same basic scales for many years after I began. One thing that accelerated the process, beyond what you described, was practicing the scales in two ways: Imagine "C" is the scale of choice. Imagine its notes C D E F G A B are ...


9

I think you've got a good list already, but I'd quibble with the in order part. I'd recommend splitting up your practice time to work on each of these fronts every day. So for a 1-hour practice, you might do Practice yesterday's scale a few times, pick a new scale and practice it. ~ 10 min. Put on your new favorite pop song and try to transcribe the chord ...


9

Leaving out notes is rare; usually you would arpeggiate. In fact, when this piece was written, it was common to arpeggiate smaller chords, too. Here you can hear Scriabin himself play Op.11 No.13. He arpeggiates the big chords and some of the others. None of them are notated in the score.


9

To learn the basics, piano/keyboard is more or less the easiest instrument out there, because the notes are structured so linearly, and you can play each note on it without needing any technical practice. You press any key, and you hear the note associated with it. Want a higher note? Play one to the right. Want a lower one? Go to the left. Once you can play ...


8

As has been said so many times - get a good teacher - at least for a while. I believe anyone can learn to play an instrument by themselves - if they live long enough !! A teacher will guide you to a suitable sax, be it soprano, alto tenor or baritone (quite expensive). Watching videos and using tutor books is good, but they won't answer a question you ...


8

It sounds that you are trying to cram the piece into your head as semantic knowledge, that is to say a string of facts ("...then comes the G7 cord..."). I do not think most -- or possibly any -- accomplished musicians store whole pieces in semantic memory. They store it in procedural memory, and they store it, above all, as the series of sounds of the ...


8

Sometimes boredom is a disconnection from a sense of purpose. That is to say, maybe whatever it was that you sought in playing an instrument, you are not finding. Maybe you need to figure out what it was you went into music to do, and let that reorient what you're doing musically. This can be a hard thing to do. A lot of people don't interrogate their ...


8

You're paying the money, you should, within reason, be asking your teacher to provide pieces that you will enjoy. Give teacher a list of 10 tunes that you feel are within your capabilities, maybe get the dots for them, and present them to teacher, who should be able to find something you can be taught by them.Often, half of any lesson I may give will be ...


8

I was in a similar situation to you when I learned how to play the piano as a kid. My piano teacher was really into classical music and picked literature for me, but I preferred electronic music and contemporary orchestral and piano music. As soon as my lessons with her ended, I quit practicing, and now I can barely read beginner-level pieces. School band ...


8

Learning theory is a major task, but if you are serious about it you will succeed. Here is what I would suggest: a. Find professional lessons in your area This is my first suggestion because when you are first starting learning music theory some of the concepts can be really hard to grasp or understand. Having someone knowledgable is very helpful at ...


8

First off, I'm going to say that many people have key preferences and there's nothing wrong with that. If you want to adapt to major keys for listening or writing, it's all a matter of preference. And not all songs in minor keys have to sound sad; there are several examples of this. Panic! at the Disco, for example. Each key has different components and ...


8

You're part of the way there. The mistake you're making, is hearing which chord is the tonic, and so which key you are in. In fact, the first chord is chord one, the tonic (Fm on the live version I just listened to on Spotify), so the progression is: Fm Db Eb Fm etc. In other words, this is i VI VII i using the chords taken from the natural minor scale (i.e. ...


7

The biggest mistake that many starting-out (and professional) keyboardists, including pianists, make is sitting at the piano incorrectly which results in playing with tension. Make sure you learn everything you can about correct bench height (generally, your forearms should be parallel with the keybed), sitting in a relaxed manner and relieving all muscle ...



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