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I want to tell you that YES! You can totally learn to play piano using YouTube, Google and music store resources completely and BETTER than with personalized instruction. Let me encourage you by telling you this: In six weeks, I have taught myself all major and relative minor scales in four octaves hands unison. I've taught myself how to read music from ...


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Well, "non-reed" eliminates most of the woodwind family, leaving only the flute family. Recorder is pretty easy. There's a reason it's the instrument of choice for elementary school music programs. It takes zero embouchure (mouth position/strength) and almost no air support--you pretty much just blow into it gently and it works. Other recorder-like ...


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No! You cannot define the "clarity" of a sound in absolute terms. If I stand next to you and gargle The Star Spangled Banner, did you just hear a "lo-fi" version of the national anthem, or a true-to-life rendition of the national anthem as heard bubbling up through liquid held in equilibrium in a human throat by the force of air being exhaled? If you ...


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I'm going to bet the recorder fits this bill.


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The violin is one of the least anatomically sane instruments. Left to your own devices, you'll end up cramping it into position, and cramping your handling into something with as few variables as you think you can manage. Once you've locked yourself into this kind of corner, it will take a lot of work getting out of there again. And violin is not a ...


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Scotland the Brave is relatively simple, but if you find it tricky to play both hands, starting with simpler music is a good idea. Generally you would start with single hand practice, left and right, learning simple scales individually, then together, and working up to more complex figures. Once you have note placement, chords can come later. This is best ...


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I have here a tune to play with tremolo harmonica. Its the most basic, common and important tune "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU". Here, the minus (-) sign indicates drawing or inhaling and plus (+) or no sign indicates blowing. Be careful, you should start with high sound side. The numbers represent the number of the hole you should draw or blow. Using the above ...


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I agree with @Mischa Arefiev. Learning the piece sloppily is not the way to go about it. As one who had studied the 'cello, you should know better than that. :) The same practice methods you use for your 'cello are the same for the piano. There's no shortcuts in this at all. Over the years, I've spent countless hours reading through new music, slowly and ...


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To an extent, you can practice on anything which has the right kind of 'bounce back' for the sticks. You don't even need that iof you're just practicing getting things in the right order. It helps if you have two objects with different sounds, so you can hear differences if practicing strokes between the two, eg like a paradiddle etc. However for practicing ...


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Depends on your frustration tolerance. Piccolo has a more challenging embouchure than flute, but you know what? Fife has a much more demanding embouchure than either, and I learned fife first. This meant it was about six weeks of assiduous blowing making nothing but a "wwwwfffff" sound, before I actually got a noise out of it. Another week or two before ...



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