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If you are willing to learn major and minor scales, and Basic Chords on a keyboard, you can do so by applying these simple formulas. W = Whole Step H = Half Step Major Scale: W W H W W W H Minor Scale: W H W W H W W You Can Build 12 Major and 12 Minor Scales by applying the above said Formulas Now Major Scale is 1st note + 3rd note + 5th note Minor ...


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wow, i am definately shocked at how under-estimated speed-typing is, perhaps most of the commenters are actually just pianists and not speed-typers, if you're a speed typist or really know about it, then you must know that speed-typing gives a great ability to control and coordinate all your ten fingers naturally to the point where it's so fast and yet ...


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Traditional music theory is basically diatonic harmony. I disagree with previous poster saying that the guitar is not an ideal instrument to learn theory on. Of course it's ideal, because it's a harmonic instrument (you can play chords on it). It and the piano are both ideal to learn theory on. Plenty of music teachers can instruct you in theory. And there ...


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You can go to a music shop that is well stocked with sheet music, method books, etc., and ask them to point you to the music theory workbooks section. Pick out Volume 1 of each series (all the major publishing houses have such a series), take them over to a comfortable chair, and choose one that appeals to you. Please don't be put off by the small amount ...


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You are right. Guitar method books don't teach much traditional music theory. This is because the guitar is not an ideal instrument upon which to learn music theory. Traditional Western music theory, as it is taught in colleges, is based around choral music. You learn to read and analyze choral music, and later to arrange and write your own chord ...


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Get a teacher. Nice and simple. One with a college degree where he or she did at least four years of theory studies. Ask him or her what kind of melody and harmony work he or she did. If he or she can write fugues and has a good knowledge on counter point then he or she would get you far. Just remember that for every 10 practical teachers there may be one ...


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You can definitely learn by yourself. Note that you will need to have discipline to learn. You will need even more to learn alone. Using someone else words: Piano is a very deep art. The fact that is polyphonic with all the scope of dynamics make it a complex machie to master. People spend a life studying piano. If your goal is to play a couple of simple ...


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To play from C6 upwards, you don't need to "power" your way through it. Instead, think of a garden hose. The more you cover the end with your thumb, the faster the water comes out. To play that third octave comfortably, you'll need to use a very concise aperture and a lot of fast-moving, concentrated air. Think about it like this: The tone hole of the ...


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You should be sure to have a good breathing technique and play from the diaphragm. The muscles in that area, should remain hard for support, even when you are low on breath. You can do excises, when breathing normally (not playing). When you breathe out, think of pushing your diaphragm down. Your abs should be firm at that point. This combined with keeping ...


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I searched out this topic to see if it is indeed a labeled phenomenon. I don't necessarily walk away from the instrument, but from some new, difficult pieces. When I come back to them a week or two later, several of my previous "sticking" places in the music have miraculously worked themselves out. I honestly believe it has something to do with hearing ...


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As someone who first learned the piano and then learned guitar, I would say it would be best if you now learn piano. The reason for this is that once you understand the piano keyboard, music theory will become much more easy for you to understand because each note on the piano only has one place and the piano is designed to play all chord inversion easily. ...


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Well, don't fool yourself: violin is difficult. But... Personal experience: I was (at the age of 15) in a similar situation as you are now. Knew guitar, wanted to learn something more classical. I tried violin. And tried. And failed. Actually I didn't try that long, nor did I take professional lessons. But I really couldn't see it going anywhere. The ...


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The answer is to learn both. They are not exclusive of each other, and as you say, you're going to learn both eventually anyway. Both require development of your music reading skills. Spending time on the one will not detract from the study of the other. Virtually all advanced, university-level music programs require the student to have fundamental basic ...


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You could think about how you use the guitar most, if you mostly play to accompany yourself singing, the piano may be a better choice. If you treat the guitar as a solo (melodic) instrument, or regularly have other musicians to play with, the violin may be a better choice. For what it's worth, playing the piano develops and uses a lot more transferable ...


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Fretless electric bass is no more difficult to play than fretted electric bass. Especially if it has guide markers to help you learn positions. It's like committing to a relationship with a specific woman. Seriously. (or, gender-bend that if you're a hetero woman bassist!) Nothing is easy in this life, it's a matter of committment and time in. THE BIG ...



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