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Title Why do I always sound better when I play violin with my teacher? One skill in violin playing is pitch. There are no frets on the violin's fingerboard: we choose the pitch of the note. So for us violinists intonation (pitching) is a skill. Many say that good intonation comes from inside the violinist, which is true, but it really helps to have a ...


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I'm not aware that this is a common problem. As a young student, I always sounded best in my own practice room and much less well during lessons. I can think of two main reasons why it might be so in your case. You may trust your teacher and your natural musicality may induce you to imitate what you hear without knowing just what it is that you do. ...


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If you want to rock right now, then the E minor pentatonic is a great place to start. It's really easy to play, sounds awesome and it's used in a bunch of tunes like Rumble, Shakin' All Over, Back in Black and many, many more. Here's the pattern: That being said, it's not a great place to start if you want to understand what you are doing. Although it ...


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B# and C are basically the same note. They are called enharmonic tones. In modern musical notation and tuning, an enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval, or key signature that is equivalent to some other note, interval, or key signature but "spelled", or named differently. The one note differs from the other depending on the harmony of the song. ...


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Your question is broad, but there is already some info about tools in other answer, so I'll focus on the mixing process. A possible approach to begin with (and many experienced musicians use it too) is what could be called "mix as you go". Start with your first track and adjust its master fader so that the track meter stays around -18dB most of the the ...


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Some great tools for making game music are FL Studio, LMMS, and GarageBand. There are plenty of tutorials on the internet as well.


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The simple answer to your question is that some people absolutely can, although there are plenty of pros who can't. Have a look at this (great fun):


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I think you are mixing up several different concepts, all called "inversion". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inversion_(music) gives a short explanation of the difference between inverted intervals inverted melodies inverted voices (in counterpoint) inverted chords (in common practice harmony) Some of these concepts might be better described as "...


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You are making it slightly more difficult. Don't forget that inverted intervals change name, too. Thus, C to E is a major 3rd, whilst E to C is a minor 6th. Yes, the 'rule of nine' applies, but the interval becomes the opposite. Take C to Eb, it's a minor 3rd; invert it, Eb to C, and it's major 6th. C to G# is aug.5th, while G# to C is dim.4th. We generally ...


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Actually the inversion of a third will always be a sixth - not a third as posited in the title of your question. 3 + 6 = 9. The inversion of a fifth will be a fourth 5 + 4 = 9. The inversion of a fourth will be a fifth 4 + 5 = 9 and so on. An inversion of an interval (by definition) is simply flipping (inverting) the two notes comprising the interval ...


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The confusion here is natural, because the "inversion" of an interval, in classical harmony, does not mean the same interval in the other direction from a given note, but rather means to move the upper note down an octave, or the lower note up an octave. Thus, the "inversion" of the interval C up to E, which is a major third, is not C down to A flat, also a ...


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If I understand your question correctly, here's the problem: I also have heard that an inversion is simply in the opposite direction of the original interval. So a descending 3rd from F to D is the inversion of ascending third F to A. This should read "a descending third from F to D is the inversion of an ascending SIXTH from F to D." Thus I think the ...


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It truly depends on what you want to play. Classical music Unless you're a true genius hearing and memorizing every single note, that is going to be an unreal challenge. Modern Absolutely possible, assuming you've learned chords. With a bit of practice, you'll reach a fairly nice rendering. If you did not learn chords, that is going to make it ...


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No, but I will say this...you spend a lot of money hiring people to middle your music if you work with an orchestra. Also, hashing out chord structure and key changes takes a hell of a lot longer. If we are talking music "production" as opposed to live performance, a solid grasp on MIDI programming will get you a hell of a lot further than a musical ...


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To answer the question whether a pro can play a piece just from hearing it once, it's more about how good of an ear the person has regardless of whether he/she is a pro or not. Some with very good ears, but with little or no training or experience, can do so with even amazingly complex music. On a general level, yes, a pro can recreate music after hearing it ...


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Sometimes, it will depend on how intricate the piece is. Being able to play what you hear is one thing, being able to memorise it is another. It may take several listens to figure out a piece of music, it can also be tricky to hear a particular part if it is very quiet in the mix.


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Play an easier piece. Think of playing with a metronome as a skill to be learned. You'll be frustrated if you try to use a metronome and learn something else at the same time, so start with music that's so simple that it requires almost no conscious attention to play. If you have a lesson book, try the metronome with one of the early lessons. Playing the ...


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I believe the answer is - it depends! It depends on what type learning style you respond best to. Some folks are aural learners while others are visual learners. I do much better playing by ear and not even thinking about the notes I am playing but rather the tones I am hearing. I can find those tones (notes) on my instrument as easily as I can whistle ...


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It is possible to learn basic rhythms by ear but eventually you will have to learn standard notation to deal with the complex stuff. I have seen this first hand. There is a Suzuki teacher in the family. Suzuki is a method that emphasizes the aural training from a young age. Trough this all though there comes a stage where the rhythms become too complicated ...


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Yes, it's called "playing by ear." In fact, one of the pinnacles of musical performance is being able to play anything you hear or can imagine without thinking of notes at all, just playing. This is why jazz players often sing along with their solos. It's often actually part of their training if they're formally schooled. Notes are like the syllables ...


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It's more than possible, it's very often done. I can listen to a tune a couple of times, and then play it, without reference to written music. I have to do it some of the time when students bring a recording along, and want to learn it. I can't waste their time - they want it now! When I'm part of the house band at open mic sessions, the same applies. I ...


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Yes, it is possible. There are people that can play music without knowing the notes. You can work out the songs either by ear or have someone tell you what to play. People use notes because it's easier to communicate with each other and it is easier to have many songs written rather than remembered by heart. It might be easy to remember 10-20 songs by heart,...


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Looking at the site you linked and clicking on each fret to change the pattern, there are actually only 5 (not 9) completely different distinct patterns that repeat. Several are exactly the same notes and some show a slight variation on the same basic "pattern". Allow me to expand on some of the other answers. The basic patterns for the minor ...


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I learned the major and minor pentatonic patterns (which are identical except for which note is the root of the scale) by first learning these five patterns: Then I learned to connect the patterns, first by playing each pattern in sequence up and down the neck and then up and down each string. Then I learned to switch between the patterns starting and ...


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So if you look carefully at the E Major Pentatonic graph, you will notice that the scales are basically overlapping barred chord forms of E (where the nut itself is a bar for open E chord): E pattern; D pattern; C pattern; A pattern; finally G pattern; repeat. By D pattern, I mean the D chord form barred at the second fret (E major). This is, basically, ...


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You can find a list of Major Scales in any basic music theory book . Also look on the web for a list of scales .Each scale has a note name.That is the keynote of the scale. A short trick to help you with sharp keys is to look at the last sharp symbol .In the diagram above the four sharps are shown in a red circle. The last sharp is on the D. So go up one ...


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Someone asked me to convert and elaborate a comment to an answer, so here goes: I believe that once a level of mastery (being a 'professional', as was termed in the question) is obtained there isn't much thought really, more just expression. To explain, asking someone what they are thinking about when they are talking in a native language would likely ...


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As a guitar player, I learned notes by shapes and positions. The same note can sound in various places on a guitar so guitar players learn to find sweet spots on the guitar where a particular melody can be played without shifting position too much. Which shapes? The standard set of shapes are found in the CAGED system but I found that a little too complex,...


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Because music is an abstract language, I'm not sure your question can be answered easily or in any of the ways you described. For me, it's a combination of my mental image of the notes on the staff, vague mental image of those notes on the keyboard, and muscle memory of how both images are supposed to sound and feel. I don't know that I consciously think of ...


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Previous to learning scales, for me it was very much hit or miss. Certain notes following each other became familiar, rather like using the same few words in several sentences. When I knew scales, it changed rather. Listening to a piece, a key is established, the sort of scale used is recognised, and the fingers (usually) tend to follow the tune ...


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It's going to vary, and you have to remember that there are also a lot of pros that learned by listening and copying what they heard on records without learning to read music. Notes can be known "personally" and this includes knowing all the various chords and scales as they relate to them. There may be no names or functions involved--I think of it as a kind ...


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From my own experience (I've been separated from the piano for 5 years), you'll need one or two months to fully recover. That is something which has stayed in your brain and muscles. As Czerny said : "One should never have to relearn (technique, especially, EdN) what he already had". Now, I'd say it's even better to step away, from times to times, and you'...



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