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Good luck with your software. Your list is rather incomplete, as it only lists majors and minors. (I'm not sure how much this matters but you should definitely be aware of this limitation.) On the other hand you seem to be aware that B# major for example is essentially never used as it needs five double sharps. Most "black note" keys use whichever of ...


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This is actually not a simple question, but neither do the answers give an accurate picture of historical practice during the common practice period. The Beethoven Fifth is a good example: we regard it as a "C-minor symphony" because its first movement is in C minor. Within that movement, C minor is, as we often say, the tonal center: it's the key to which ...


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If you know the basics of reading music, you could probably get a score of any piece written before 1900 from the IMSLP and quickly page through it looking for key changes. For example, if you scan the score for Beethoven's Fifth, the first movement is in C minor, the second movement is in A-flat major, the third movement has sections in both C major and C ...


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It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


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If a symphony has the key "C Minor", can it also have another key? I think the misconception you are having is that certain instruments are transposing by their nature. The Bb clarinet for instance when it plays a C what you are actually hearing is a Bb. So if the strings play in C major, the Bb clarinet would have its score written in D Major. This is ...


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Every symphony ever written has more than one key -- usually several different keys. A symphony may have the name of a certain key in its title, but this only refers to the main key that occurs throughout its structure. Each symphony will have many changes to different keys. Each symphony will tend to be unique in how it uses multiple keys. Different ...


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A composition like "Symphony in C minor" refers to a key in the piece, with which key the composition starts and with which it ends. There is a certain number of notes and chords in that key, so if a whole composition was built only on that key, it would sound repetitive. That's why during the composition changes keys. Usually it's more than one, but it ...


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Having spoken to a guitarist I work with who planted a mandolin neck onto his acoustic guitar complete with bridge and soundhole, and pup, (it works really well with both!) he said that he thinks of each as a separate instrument. Guitar chord shapes belong to one set, mandolin shapes to another, and the twain never meets. So, just like learning a new guitar ...


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If you understand intervals and chord tones, this should serve you well learning the mandolin, because you can learn a few "core" shapes and fingerings and then know how to modify then to get the full palette of chords. In this sense, your guitar knowledge shouldn't get in the way of learning mandolin. For example: learn the basic open major chords on the ...


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I would say scales are easier and chords are just different. It's almost like learning the same chords in a different position on the neck of the guitar that you've never learned before because that "position" doesn't even exist on guitar. It's also only four courses so it's a bit simplified. For example, an open G major chord is easy on mandolin: It's 0 0 2 ...



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