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1

For guitarists, I strongly recommend that you learn songs by ear. You will gain a deep understanding of the song that you will probably remember for life. There are tabs all over the internet which you can use to check your work, but they should be a last resort. It might seem difficult at first, so start with easy songs. And be prepared to spend multiple ...


6

There are many different ways to approach playing bass and depending on what style you are trying to go for it may be all you need to fill the sound. I'll explain a few simple styles and techniques that can spice up a bass line. Octaves Rather simple, but effective. Your still playing only the root note, but changing the octave is a very simple and ...


4

The first suggestion I would make is learn some music theory. While not necessary, music theory can help make sense of what your doing. For example, lets say there is a song that rotates through a very basic I-V-vi-IV progression. Music theory will help you understand not only how the notes of each chord relate to each other but also allow you know what ...


2

For instance this? choord: | D | | G | | D | | note: | D - - - | A - - - | G - - - | - A B C# | D - - A | D E D C# | Bm | | G ... B - - F# | B C# B A | G ... Most commonly, the bass would play the root (1st) and the dominant (5th), and less commonly other notes of the ...


0

I've been a self taught drummer for 20 years and I wish I had this tool when I was beginning. Is it gonna make you a great drummer? No, but it will teach you dexterity in your limbs and rythms every drummer should know for a solid base of rock drumming. .


4

I play bass in a classic rock cover band. Our repertoire is currently somewhere in the 50-song range, so I've dealt with this problem. Firstly, the more you practice, the more you will retain. It's a bit easier in a band setting where you're running through your setlist at rehearsal every day/week/whatever. So even though it seems like a huge task, it ...


0

One great way to "internalize" a song you wish to perform is to post a video of you performing the song on YouTube. Knowing that you are playing for a "worldwide" audience will encourage you to want to do the best performance you can muster. Which will encourage you to practice until you reach a level of proficiency that would allow you to feel good ...


2

It sounds like in the case of learning simple written music, you are relying primarily on muscle memory. This means that your brain has memorized the series of movements, rather than a series of conscious decisions, in order to perform a piece. When you look down at your hands, your conscious mind gets in the way of the largely unconscious process that is ...


2

It puts your visual analysis in gear and makes you conscious of your movements. But watching your movements arrives with a delay and detachment as opposed to initiating your movements: for anything but trivial play, movements are anticipated, so the brain activity in the motoric region precedes the actual action while your watching it trails in behind. You ...


2

Thoughts from a drummer who can't read notes anyway... Practice, practice, practice... Ideally with someone else. This will turn practicing into a performance. You will play better knowing someone else is listening; being more critical of yourself. Recording can be used to substitute the mental heightening the 'listening' of another player causes, though ...


0

It depends a lot on how you learn a new song. Your memory will to some extent be dependent on the method you used. The best way for a piece to really "stick" is to use a variety of approaches. The more senses you can engage in the learning process, the better: Listen, preferably to various versions. Listen while following along in the sheet music or tab. ...


0

Your are human and unlike us the machines your brain is very limited.You can either: 1) Accept your limitations (deal with it!). 2) Wait for a couple of decades until artificial brain enlargement is a common procedure and human race becomes a bit less pathetic. 3) Use a machine to store and replay your music. As a common rule, you should always leave the ...


2

A certain amount of "forgetting" is normal when you don't play a piece very often. Usually you can refresh a piece that has been memorized with much less practice than it took to initially learn it. You may want to start thinking in terms of what your personal repertoire is. Whatever those initial (pick a number) favorite tunes are, make sure to ...


2

On a digital audio recorder (or equivalent), record the melody only for the song. Do this for each song in your set list. When you practice a song, playback the melody first on the recording. Then harmonize it (fit the chords to it in both hands). Do this by ear. Repeat periodically with random tunes out of your set list, until you are able to play and ...


16

This is a question without a single, solve-everything answer. There are a number of different approaches you can take, and different people will have their own preferences. Fake it. This works well in some traditional music, bluegrass, rock, or jazz, where a certain amount of improvisation is expected of a musician. With a song you haven’t played in ...


7

Simple: don't try to "learn new stuff constantly". If you want to gain proficiency at pieces you already know, and you don't want to forget them, you must practice them and that in turn entails making the time to do so. That is time that you cannot spend learning new stuff. I'd say this comes down to learning patience.


2

I gather that we are talking about practicing. I think it is good that you notice these issues. There is another (related) can of worms to bring up, that sometimes it is good to separate your left hand and right hand practice on the guitar, depending on what you are trying to achieve.... Experience guides guitarists to recognize tricks that often aid the ...


12

Leaning basic theory will always help a player regardless of instrument because there are general patterns in music that are prevalent including scales, chords, and progressions. The ability to recognize these common patters will allow you to group songs that utilize these patterns to aid in memorizing songs because instead of remembering a group of notes or ...


0

It's more complex than just a melody and bass line - obviously a melody line exists whenever there is a vocal but the music could also be considered as a sequence of chords or as a bass plus multiple lines if you are playing multiple notes at once. The actual "bass line" isn't even shown on a guitar tab; you're only seeing what the guitar part for that song ...


3

You could work at recognising the chords in your piano pieces too, if you find that easier. I think that's kind of the key, understanding the music rather than just memorising it - knowing where it's going. Professional players seem able to play just about anything they know - but they aren't playing it note-perfect, they can work out from how the song goes ...


0

I use flash cards with my students. This is something that you have to do by rote, like learning multiplication tables. A few things can help, though. FACE and Every Good Boy Does Fine (and then All Cows Eat Grass and Good Boys Do Fine Always for the bass clef) are useful mnemonics. But also, consider looking at middle C in both treble and bass clef. ...


0

To me, the most important is being able look at it with all the factors around it. The last thing I would look closer is that the one you are asking actually. The reason is that nowadays there are so many great schools are offering a sort of high-end education with all the educational opportunities. But to me, the music life is not about school; the greatest ...


0

As an encouragement, you might want to think about the different movements involved in driving a car. (Especially if you have driven a stick shift before.) You had to practice before you could get all the movements down correctly. Once you did, you did them without thinking about them. So it is with the piano. Visualize what needs to be done and do it. ...


0

I've played the piano for over 40 years. Something to remember is that it's music, not a set of sequentially formatted computer instructions. ;) So, there are several possible ways that any one brain might approach playing a two-handed piece, and for any two brains, there might be at least one or two more. Let's say, as an example, I have a piece with an ...


0

Human brain has left and right sides. Left side is primarily responsible for the right hand, and right side for the left hand, but also there is a good coordination in between. Hence there is no any reason to assume that brain would have difficulties in using both hands for a complex work.


0

It's just practice and perseverance. If you aren't able to stick for 5 minutes doing some exercise by rote and want to just play the whole time, there's not a lot that can be done. Conversely, even a little disciplined practice will make a big difference.


3

I assume that this person already understands the stave and can, slowly and methodically, translate between a stave position, a note name, and its position on an instrument (that is, which key to play, which fret to hold, etc. depending on the instrument). I assume this because they're simple concepts. What he needs is practice; and to encourage him to ...


0

This is just a personal anecdote, as I have no experience in teaching. But I've recently started trying to teach myself basic music theory from scratch as an adult, so I may have some insight. The lightbulb moment for me came when I saw the grand staff. Middle C is between the staves. Then it just goes up alphabetically into the treble staff, and down ...


2

I'm learning oud since 5 months now. I don't have any experience with banjo, but sitar (from Indian Classical Music). To address your questions, in my opinion, oud is a bit easier than sitar, but probably more difficult than other instruments, specifically for getting the right intonation (and we're speaking microtonally). As always, the more you practice, ...


5

How you describe the harmony (chords) at a point such as the beginning of bar 4, depends upon what any chord symbols are going to be used for. There are in fact several ways to notate the passage you're describing. (For this answer I'm assuming that you do indeed want an Am chord sounding with all the bass notes in bars 3-4). Here are some options: if you ...


1

Not entirely sure what question you're asking, but any octave for a bass note will work. When you're on, say, Am, then frequently the bassist will be playing any of the notes which constitute that chord :A,C and/or E. Certainly at the 1st and 3rd beats of a 4/4 bar - the strongest, usually. The last beat or half beat may stray so that it points to the first ...


8

You're not breaking any unwritten rules here. It is in fact pretty common to use the 5th of the chord leading up to the root a fourth higher in the bass. However, in your bassline the question is if you really mean an A minor chord in the last bar. If you hear an A minor chord over both bars in the bottom line then - by definition - that's the way it is ...


0

Your brain always does several things at once, walking/talking, chewing gum, etc. .. Your ability to do it on the piano depends partly on practice and partly on natural ability. When a pianist sees a written score, they see a single thing that is shared between two hands.


6

It depends on the individual, but I'm going to talk about my own experience. Two things to note: It's not really true that each hand is doing something different. Both hands are working together to create a piece of music. Although at first glance it's "special" to have one hand playing one aspect of a piece while the other hand plays a different aspect ...


1

I think it depends on how you learn a piece. Sometimes you might learn a piece by learning all the particular movements related to each other. Playing these and these notes on these beats and so on. However, most of the time, pianists will learn one hand, then the other. Ultimately they will try to learn one well enough, so playing that part almost ...


8

You can't tell for certain either which key this is in, or which chords would appear above these bass notes, but for different reasons... This short excerpt of music has only four pitches: E, D, F# and G - these notes are found in the scales of several keys: G Major and its relative minor E Minor (natural minor) have these notes: E, F#, G, A, B, C, D D ...


0

Question 1) I use an 88 key Roland stage piano with midi out when I need it. Stage because it saves space and fairly portable (still 25kg) and have sometimes packed it away in flight case when not being used. Still requires a dedicated space in any room. Question 2) I got fully weighted because its main purpose was to learn how to play classical piano, but ...


2

With a "MIDI keyboard", you are not going to learn the basics of piano but rather of keyboard play. Basically all keyboards that have action seriously suitable for actual piano play also have their own sound generators and more often than not built-in amplifiers. While they may also sport MIDI output, using that is optional and, short of rather high ...


0

Every kid wants to play guitar, drums, or even keyboard, when your in second and third grade you don't even know what the musical notes sound like. Thus the recorder is the best way to teach children the sound of notes and to read sheet music.It is why most children learn to play it first.


0

I think the key to this question is: what is your reason for using solfege? The commonest use for solfege, is as an aid to learning vocal parts - especially harmony parts where the main melody can distract you from the harmonising pitches you're supposed to be singing. Having trained yourself to associate the words do,re,mi... with intervals, the words ...


0

Your best learning material for this is to find someone who plays this style, asking them to play while you watch and video tape it. Ask them questions if needed. Ask them to break it down. Take the video home, slow it down, watch the keys and learn. There aren't any books I'm aware of for this style, and transcribing albums can be daunting. Best to watch ...



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