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0

When answering this question I always answer with 'meh, I know a few chords'. This demonstrates modesty, which some people perceive musicians to be lacking and doesn't set anybodies expectations too high. If people are interested in you joining their band then no descriptions can really be a substitute for actually hearing you play. Now, in terms of ...


5

I'm sorry, I can't find the quote, it's pre-WWW. But I think it was in an interview in "Guitar Player," that Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones once replied to some flattery by saying that he was only an intermediate guitar player. Because he was better than a lot of guitar players but a lot of guitar players were better than him. So I'd go with ...


7

Not the easiest of questions to try to answer, but - exams have always been a way to determine this kind of level. In essence, someone on, say, grade V on any instrument could be construed as as advanced as another who has grade V. Especially if it's on the same instrument. However, there are various different styles of guitar, and playing.This has been ...


2

Most of the other answers have covered your options, but there is one more possibility you might want to consider before buying an electric guitar. They make sound-hole dampeners for acoustic guitars that are used to fight feedback when playing an acoustic amplified on stage, but they also provide some dampening of the volume of the guitar. Check the link ...


2

I agree with the others that you should try an electric. Quite with no amp. Or would it be possible to find a place other than your flat to practice?


5

For acoustic style (nylon string or steel string) there is also the possibility of buying a silent guitar. Such guitars create the same output volume as electric guitars when not plugged in.


3

If you can get an electric guitar, that'd be the easiest approach. Just play it without amplification. And you could even use headphones to make sure you could hear yourself. If you're using an acoustic, you can do a few things to muffle the sound: Put a t-shirt inside the body (inside the soundhole) to dampen it a bit. Weave cloth between the strings by ...


1

If you had an electric guitar you could play it without using an amplifier. The sound would be very low but YOU could hear it if there wasn't too much other noise around. Also some amplifiers have a headphone jack that can cut off the speaker and send the sound only thru the headphones. I also think that you can play an electric guitar through your ...


1

I'll caveat this by saying that I'm just going by ear here, and I don't have a keyboard handy to check my results. Listening to the song, I think you're pretty close. You're hearing the bass/root motion descending a third, then ascending back up by two steps. However, I think that what you're identifying as III is actually the tonic (I). If you listen to the ...


8

You're part of the way there. The mistake you're making, is hearing which chord is the tonic, and so which key you are in. In fact, the first chord is chord one, the tonic (Fm on the live version I just listened to on Spotify), so the progression is: Fm Db Eb Fm etc. In other words, this is i VI VII i using the chords taken from the natural minor scale (i.e. ...


6

I have two answers, but first a caveat: I'm a singer, and I firmly believe that, as a singer, a solid technique should let you sing in any style — but rap isn't really my thing (like, I don't even recognize the name "Mike Shinoda"), so my advice is going to be about basic, healthy vocal technique in general (especially for men, which I'm guessing you are one ...


0

You can check out ChordZone It has all the vital information of the songs such as scale, tempo, time signature etc. All the chords used in the song can also be found there. You will also be able to suggest songs that you want to learn.


1

I suggest doing it by means of Finale and Sibelius. Also Musescore is useful, but... If You're not acquainted with the programs, You may and will have troubles with any of them. This is why, You shouldn't do't by Yourself, just order scores and get it back in PDF, print them and play flute or else. I suggest this service: ...


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


0

There's only one way you can learn theory without knowing how to read music: a teacher explains and shows you. So you can get this either with in-person lesson (teacher sitting next to you) or online video lesson. That's it.


0

Some motivational material, enjoy! Videos Avicii working with EDM: David Guetta speaking about the development with melody (feeling) and energy: ...


0

Learning music theory without sight reading is like learning poetry without reading. Sight reading is not essential to music theory, but scores are the written language in which the music theory has been laid down. Now with a guitar, "sight reading" mostly describes a reproductive skill, like being able to recite a text you did not know before. It is not ...


0

Yes - I compose orchestral music as a hobby, but I don't play any instruments. So, yes, technically you can learn theory without knowing how to sight read


1

Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...


1

Whilst agreeing with most of Shev's answer, I feel that sight reading is a lot more straightforward on a keyboard type instrument.For each note on the stave, there is only one place to play it. Thus it makes more sense, and the 'geography' of a melody is simpler to translate onto the keys. With a guitar, there are sevceral different places to play the same ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


2

It's not too late at all! The obvious answer to this question is to practice. A great way to practice singing is to sing along with songs that you love. During my initial foray into the wonderful world of singing, I used to extensively practice my singing while driving. If you have access to an instrument this will greatly aid your vocal abilities since ...


7

This is a Very Hard technical problem, so very few sites or apps do it. The ones that do are inaccurate most of the time, either in subtle ways or in super-obvious ways. The expectations they set in their marketing copy are way out of line with the realities. Some products to try: Chordify, Riffstation, Capo (Mac app). Prepare to be disappointed. :-) ...


1

chordify.net creates chords by analyzing youtube videos... But it is often wrong so I wouldn't trust it with more technical songs. Should be fine for pop or most rock songs. Try learning music by ear instead. It is much more efficient once you are experienced enough, and also strengthens your ear for chord relations, intervals, modulations, etc. I can ...



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