Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This is a common beginner problem, and there are exercises you can use to help you. It sounds like you want to gain independence of the fingers. In addition to finding a reputable exercise volume that includes finger independence exercises, you can do the following things: Practice scales, two to four octaves up and down, all twelve keys, especially with ...


0

Go to a music store and ask for the method books section. Grab a little stack of volume 1 books from different series. Take them over to the electric piano demo area and try out some of their tunes. I am very partial to anything by Faber and Faber. And I absolutely LOVE Waxman's Exertudes. You'll probably have to order this. But these etudes give you ...


1

To my mind scales and arpeggios are something you should consider. There's a lot written about them in various answers on this site, but from your angle, they will help to create independence between the fingers of each hand, and each hand itself. As the fingering for each scale is different, (when looking at each hand), as you play, although the notes will ...


3

Great responses. I recommend the following (I used to do this often): Take any given passage that involves that "finger stuck" problem. Using the correct fingering as if you would normally play it (it would be helpful to write down the correct fingering if you are not comfortable remembering it), play those two notes (thumb and index finger) while also ...


7

Widor's suggestion of slowing down is great. Another than can be used in conjunction with it or on its own is to play staccato. Staccato obviously necessitates lifting your fingers back off the keys, and it will change the sound drastically to ensure that you are concentrating on it. It also has the added benefit of building strength, which can help you ...


9

Releasing notes after the correct duration is all part of practising. Just as the attack of a note starting at the right time is important, so is the release. I practice this by slowing the tempo right down, by half or even more. Whatever you need to give yourself enough 'thinking time'. Then really focus on each note length and when notes in each voice get ...


3

Mentorship: If you want to be a performing musician, then your teachers should be other performing musicians--your current and future peers. Teachers in an academic setting don't always know how to perform. I've had a stable regularly performing band for about twenty years now. Everything I learned about being a performing musician I learned from other ...


1

Particularly in a University setting, you should contact the director of the school's band or orchestra. There are likely many, many small events in the school calendar where a music ensemble would be very welcome. Any sort of small reception or lunch can be made more inviting with a musical group. I was in my school's Jazz Combo which was one of a few ...


0

Adding a few minor 7 flat 5 chords (or half diminished 7ths) to that list would open up your repertoire quite a bit. Many songs with circle progressions - Autumn Leaves and Stranger in paradise, etc - use this type of chord. Em7b5, Am7b5, Bm7b5 and F#m7b5 all have simple open shapes. eg. Em7b5 - 010030 Am7b5 - X01013 Bm7b5 - X20201 F#m7b5 - 202210


1

Check out R.G.T exam grades, for both electric and acoustic, also Rockschool exams.(Both in U.K.) Intermediate may be construed as grade III or IV.


0

AS E & A not strummed put capo on 5


0

If you play Classical Guitar: Try raising the footstand a click so your wrist can remain straight. Make sure your arm isn't on anything (like the arm of a chair). Barre Chords are essential. You can ignore the rest of this post. If You Play on a Steel String Acoustic or Electric: Assuming you play Rock, Blues, Metal or even Jazz (I am open to be ...



Top 50 recent answers are included