Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Different people think in different ways, and what works for you may not work for other people. So you need to do some exploring, to find out how your own mind works. Some alternatives to thinking in terms of intervals for each step: Concentrate on how it sounds For some people, it helps to have an idea in your head of what the scale will sound like, then ...


2

If you're learning scales for guitar, then a powerful way to practice scales is to play the arpeggiated harmonized scale. Take for example C major. C D E F G A B The harmonized scale are the diatonic chords that use each note in the scale as the root. C Dm Em F G Am Bdim The harmonized arpeggiated scale would be: C E G D F A E G B F A ...


1

The way I memorized modes and scales was playing some jazz. I would analyze the piece and think about which scales could sound good over each chord. Playing at a slow tempo, very slow usually, I'd go through the piece trying to come up with ideas using the scales. This is a very lame way of playing jazz, but you'll sometimes be surprised at the things you ...


8

I would venture that you're doing it correctly, and that it takes awhile. I was still reaching new levels of mastery over the same basic scales for many years after I began. One thing that accelerated the process, beyond what you described, was practicing the scales in two ways: Imagine "C" is the scale of choice. Imagine its notes C D E F G A B are ...


3

This is another example where it's a culmination of finding a technique that works for you, and then sticking to a practice regime when you find one that works. One way I have found particularly useful, was using the circle of fifths as you said, and going one way round (i.e through the sharps) and then back the other way. Once I had this, I started doing it ...


1

I went to amazon.com and did a classical guitar book search, and evaluated based on the reviews. It seemed to be somewhat of a draw between: The Christopher Parkening Guitar Method - Volume 1: Guitar Technique Solo Guitar Playing - Book 1 I settled on Parkening, but I haven't launched into it at all


2

Interval complexity is a direct function of the distance between the lowest note of the interval as compared to the highest note of the interval with the closest note in the harmonic series of the lowest note of the interval. (Phew!) Let me explain: Poor Man's Harmonic Series: For the sake of this explanation, let's pretend the harmonic series represents ...


3

When I studied classical guitar, my teacher based his course on the Carcassi Method. I would give it a thumbs up. Get a foot stool or use your guitar case as a prop in order to achieve the proper posture. Develop both the rest stroke and free stroke for your picking hand, and keep your fret hand thumb behind the neck rather than atop it. Best of luck! Enjoy ...


2

I would say it's much more important to get her singing than to get her singing lessons. She can sing in a childrens' choir, form a band, etc. There are so many different things one can do with singing, and early formal study as (say) a classical singer could (maybe! not necessarily) be counterproductive if she ends up wanting to front a band. Or vice ...


2

Play within your reach. The time necessary to stretch out for certain +1 and +2 chords may inhibit you from playing them at tempo. If you must, use them at the beginning or after a suitable rest period, so that you have time to set them up. If you take the opportunity to watch jazz masters, you may discover that there are an incredible number of chords ...


2

Might be a good idea to combine finger stretching exercises with actually learning some guitar basics. If your goal is to eventually play solos/lead guitar, then you could learn the pentatonic scale in the most common shapes. There are tutorials like this one all over the web. I often struggle with the stretches for just one or two chords (basically ...


2

I learned a few of the scales first and learned some chord progressions that a teacher told me fit over them, and then learned chord theory, and that worked out. For chord theory you should learn first major and minor scales, because those are the most straight forward. The chord has to have only the notes of the scale in it. A chord is formed by the root, ...


1

Whilst leaning all the scales will be of great help in your playing, and probably understanding, the main one for this purpose is the major scale. Chords basically are made up of 1-3-5 of a scale. These are triads- 3 notes. Using the major scale, these will be major chords. To get minors, you could just make the maj. 3rd into a min. 3rd, rather than use the ...


1

The answer depends on the teachers available in your area. If you live near a big city, or near a music school you will have more options than if you do not. 1) Choose a voice teacher experienced in the style of music you wish to learn. Many teachers will lie and say they can teach every style. If you want pop, find a pop teacher, if you want classical ...


2

+1 for the Carcassi Method. My teacher recommended that as well. As for tremolo picking, try this experiment: make a fist. In what order did you close your fingers? Pinky first? Index last? Then thumb? Probably. (That's how I do it.) Consequently, I found it easier to tremolo pick in the same order. For instance, in Leyenda, I would first use p-i, then ...


3

With regard to instruments aging: cheap instruments age a lot more than expensive ones, and well-kept old instruments age very little. My own instrument is a special build from 1960 custom-made for a soloist. Its action is noisier and heavier than that of new instruments of similar class. Its sound and responsiveness, however, is of the kind where you ...


3

There are a number of pieces in the classical music repertoire that were specifically written to help learners develop their tremolo technique. Note: Be absolutely sure to use the correct right-hand fingers in learning tremolo. Carcassi's 25 Etudes, which are in the public domain and can be found in PDF version online, has several pieces which, if ...


2

For right hand tremolo, there is no reason to damp or mute the string. I don't actually know of any pieces where you would do this. You have a range of options - but the most common these days is to use tirando strokes to pluck, which will definitely not lead to any muting. Even apoyando shouldn't. So typically, you would use tirando or apoyando with i and ...


0

One trick that will make your life easier is to place your barring finger in a way that your articulations fall on a string. The fleshy parts of your finger are not your friends! Also try slightly rotating the finger to find the edge with less flesh on it. You will need way less pressure this way. It is true that you need to strengthen your fingers, but ...


2

Slim has a solid answer. To supplement his answer with some resources: There are many chord dictionaries online that can provide you with a comprehensive list of tablature for any given chord. I've found JGuitar's dictionary to be quite nice: http://www.jguitar.com/chorddictionary.jsp I also created a tool that allows you to type in, for your example, ...


0

There are two possible causes for your specific problem of muting adjacent open strings: 1 -Poor fretting technique To avoid muting adjacent strings you need to fret with your finger tips not your finger pads. Fretting with your tips makes the first joint lie more perpendicular to the fingerboard and the pads will not mute the adjacent strings, Fretting ...


2

One of the best guitarists I know of, Redd Volkaert, has the stubbiest fingers I have ever seen. Not an excuse. Remember to play with your fingertips and keep your thumb at the center of the back of the neck. I don't know your material, but be aware that not every string does need to be played, so if an open string gets muted, that can be fine. And play ...


1

If you play daily for at least an hour, you will build the finger callous needed for proper fretting within a few weeks. Practice makes perfect. Keep jamming, My Friend! Watch the hands of experienced guitarists, and look to see if they hold it differently, your grip on the guitar can also change your finger agility.


0

I found that an electric guitar is much easier to play for me as the action (distance between strings and fretboard) is much lower and allows my small fingers to move around more efficiently and accurately. Nylon strings are also more comfortable on the hands when you need to push them down more. Most likely your problem is that you're just starting out... ...


0

Firstly, DO NOT put electric guitar strings on acoustic guitar! I began playing and learning guitar when I'm 10 years old, where my hands are small. If you want to be able playing the guitar as soon as possible, perhaps the problem is in your guitar: Your guitar's action when you got acoustic guitar strings on. Your guitar's quality of nut, saddle, and ...


1

Just to add something to the above answers. Since percussive instruments are rhythmic, you should really really focus on rhythmic exercises. Something that really helped me when I began studying drums were the rhythm solfege books. There many of them and they start from the very basics of the rhythms. I suggest getting the first one and start practicing ...


5

TL;DR: If you are a beginner, your teacher will probably ask you to get a practice-pad and some drum sticks. If you are just starting as a percussionist, you will first need to learn basic rudiments, which will allow you to play a range of percussion instruments, and then specialise at some instruments if you wish to (unless you are starting to learn a very ...


0

The best person to enquire to is the Director of the particular Conservatory you wish to go to. There must be a syllabus to peruse, and a list of appropriate equipment needed, as well as a synopsis of the course you wish to follow and hopefully complete.This sounds similar to the Greek tutor courses which take, I believe, about 15 yrs to complete.



Top 50 recent answers are included