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1

I suggest doing it by means of Finale and Sibelius. Also Musescore is useful, but... If You're not acquainted with the programs, You may and will have troubles with any of them. This is why, You shouldn't do't by Yourself, just order scores and get it back in PDF, print them and play flute or else. I suggest this service: ...


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


0

There's only one way you can learn theory without knowing how to read music: a teacher explains and shows you. So you can get this either with in-person lesson (teacher sitting next to you) or online video lesson. That's it.


0

Some motivational material, enjoy! Videos Avicii working with EDM: David Guetta speaking about the development with melody (feeling) and energy: ...


0

Learning music theory without sight reading is like learning poetry without reading. Sight reading is not essential to music theory, but scores are the written language in which the music theory has been laid down. Now with a guitar, "sight reading" mostly describes a reproductive skill, like being able to recite a text you did not know before. It is not ...


0

Yes - I compose orchestral music as a hobby, but I don't play any instruments. So, yes, technically you can learn theory without knowing how to sight read


1

Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...


1

Whilst agreeing with most of Shev's answer, I feel that sight reading is a lot more straightforward on a keyboard type instrument.For each note on the stave, there is only one place to play it. Thus it makes more sense, and the 'geography' of a melody is simpler to translate onto the keys. With a guitar, there are sevceral different places to play the same ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


2

It's not too late at all! The obvious answer to this question is to practice. A great way to practice singing is to sing along with songs that you love. During my initial foray into the wonderful world of singing, I used to extensively practice my singing while driving. If you have access to an instrument this will greatly aid your vocal abilities since ...


2

This is a Very Hard technical problem, so very few sites or apps do it. The ones that do are inaccurate most of the time, either in subtle ways or in super-obvious ways. The expectations they set in their marketing copy are way out of line with the realities. Some products to try: Chordify, Riffstation, Capo (Mac app). Prepare to be disappointed. :-) ...


0

chordify.net creates chords by analyzing youtube videos... But it is often wrong so I wouldn't trust it with more technical songs. Should be fine for pop or most rock songs. Try learning music by ear instead. It is much more efficient once you are experienced enough, and also strengthens your ear for chord relations, intervals, modulations, etc. I can ...


1

You should understand that Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits uses a playing technique that is quite out of the ordinary for electric guitarists. He does not strum or play solos with a guitar pick, not ever. He plays "fingerstyle", in a fashion similar to that used by classical guitarists. He plays all his guitar parts by alternating strokes between the thumb, ...


3

This is way old but I want to comment because I'm a massive Dire Straits fan. I started out my guitar playing career working on Sultans of Swing from videos on the internet. I play finger style, no pick, so it was hard to get both the right picking action and the left hand movements. Because I started with a song I know so well, backwards and forwards, I can ...


2

Good sites and great suggestions especially in the second link. Give them a try. But always stay under the limit and don't go beyond such that you end up breaking your precious fingers. For practicing on the guitar I would suggest following finger exercises (while playing): Using fingers 1 and 2: $6 1 3 $5 1 3 $4 1 3 $3 1 3 $2 1 3 $1 1 3 and back ...


1

Just some minor additions to an almost perfect answer by @AxxieD Minor scales are believed to be more depressing/sad than the major scales which is probably why you like them. Also it depends on your mood. But that is not always the case! A specific combination of notes of the minor scale can also make it sound happy/like a major scale. Similarly a ...


1

"x over y" is an expression used in music, and in mathematics. The time signature can be thought mathematically as x * 1 / y, for example, 4 * 1 / 4. I wouldn't worry too much about it looking mathematical, personally, since when used in context it will be correctly understood, and not confusing in a musical context. What are you doing in inline text, ...



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