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2

Three things that I do: Play the memory game: play a note; play the first one and add a 2nd; play the first two and add a 3rd, etc, etc. Do this until you cannot remember all of them. Make it a goal to improve by one note each time you play. Advice: use a diatonic scale at first, atonal is difficult. Play a pitch, match it with your voice. Now go do ...


0

Do notes from non-natural minor scales fit well in the associated major key? They can, depending on context. I wondered if this means that F# and G# would be the "least controversial" notes to add when playing in C major since they come from variants of the associated minor key? i.e. they'd fit quite nicely without sounding too dissonant? ...


1

Yes it fits well. It is basically the same scale that starts on different notes with the exception of the leading tone of the Harmonic minor which is raised by a semi tone and in the case of the Melodic minor both the Sub Mediant and the Leading Tone is raised when going up and also then lowered when going down (Natural Minor).


1

I would start with taking the free Berklee Music course Gary Burton teaches on www.coursera.org - Introduction to Jazz Improvisation. Next session starts in 6 days. I also just realized this is a really old question, so hopefully the OP is still around and has progressed in his jazz playing skills :)


1

In a-minor: G# is coming from the dominant of a-minor (E-G#-B). F# is coming from the subdominant of a-minor (D-F#-A). Generally, the scale is fitted to the harmonic progression in accordance with where the scale moves. Because of the dominant chord used when progressing from G to A, G is augmented to G# in the ascending scale of a melodic minor ...


2

This is going into modal territory. There are also 'minor' scales in some of the modes. Obviously the Aeolian, as mentioned, but Dorian and Phrygian also sport that important minor third from the root. The F# mentioned will appear in the C Lydian mode, although it's perceived as a major mode.That F# can also be thought of as a b5 as in blues. Actually, any ...


2

I think a very safe answer is that interacting with your child is much more important than worrying about unknown risks linked to parental tone deafness. Give and take, have a conversation, sing, smile, dance to the beat of music, and don't hold back - add rich emotional dynamics with your face while you interact with your child. Make sure the musical ...


1

It occurs to me in reading all the answers posted so far (by well meaning members of the community offering what they perceive to be useful advice) that the ONLY answer that seems correct is: We don't actually know how singing dissonant off pitch musical phrases to an infant during the very early stages of language development might affect their future ...


6

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


0

Don't worry, if the child has the skill, he/she will soon be able to tell the difference between your singing and a perfect tune singing. In addition to that, establishing an emotional communication with your child is more important than anything else. Rather than blocking yourself from singing, provide access to good quality music besides that. So that you ...


9

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


4

I have a tool made just for this: http://www.michalpaszkiewicz.co.uk/chordprogressiontool/ The program is open source too, so you can take the code and do what you like, or improve upon the project itself.


1

This is pretty close, but not exact. This site has a good amount of chords under separate urls. http://classpiano.com/chord-dictionary/ You could send your friend: AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ AbM7 : http://classpiano.com/a-flat-maj7-chord/ Bb : http://classpiano.com/b-flat-chord/ Gm : http://classpiano.com/g-m-chord/ Ab : ...


0

I've been learning flute for 11 months, and I have only very partial control over the 2nd octave. If you are comfortable in the first two octaves after just 6 months, I'd say you're doing better than me. To your question, I also have times when nothing is working right, and I can't tell whether it's the flute or me that has gone haywire. Personally, I tend ...


0

Look at what singers say about breath support -- same thing for flute. You need to balance tension in the muscles in your abdomen used for expiration with that in those used for inspiration, to get more control of just how fast the air is moving up through your mouth (since that has to change going from one note to another and going from soft to loud). ...


1

Trevor Wye, in Practice Books for the Flute, Tone, p. 5, explains why long tone practice is good: "... provided he [the student] can hear the undesirable aspects of his tone, his self-correcting mechanism will ensure that it improves." I take it, that mechanism is biofeedback. However, I think I've identified an aspect of embouchure that this doesn't work ...


0

It's one of the joys of being human! We can't always switch on and be whatever we want. Mental and physical states have a lot to do with it. Some of my pupils play fantastically at some lessons, but if they come, say, after playing a football match or a couple of hours maths coaching, they might at well go straight home! Try to be able to play at any time ...


2

Oddly enough, I actually ran into this very scenario yesterday as I was giving a guitar lesson. I initially had the student play the G in the way you describe, with pinkie on the high "e" (I always play this way as it is much easier for many other chord shapes). After seeing the student struggle quite a bit, we switched to the other fingering indicated in ...


2

It's something , as a teacher, that I've never addressed. Whichever is the easier option is the one taken. It's after all, within the first half a dozen chords a beginner will learn. Fingers will be weak, but one way or other will suit most.At some point, they need strengthening, so why not start immediately? Occasionally, pupils will also use the 3rd fret ...


1

Not sure what instrument you are trying to learn but I am a big fan of learning to play an instrument by learning to play songs you personally like as opposed to learning "When The Saints Go Marching In" because it's in a lesson book. Learning an instrument takes dedication and practice and it is easy to lose interest if you are only learning to play songs ...


0

There are already a whole load of answers but I thought I'd share some nice videos on the topic - and also to reiterate "everybody struggles with this!" There's no magic 'trick' to barre chords, you just have to practice both the technique and build up some strength. Just like you have to build up calluses on your fingertips over time, you have to build up ...


0

Long term success with barre chords comes from repetition and proper form. Be sure your thumb is directly behind your barre finger when you form the chord. To make things easier as you build strength, try tuning the guitar a half or whole step flat which will reduce the string tension and make it easier to play barre chords. If you don't want to play your ...


0

How is it possible for unlettered musicians to excel? First premise: Music is created and manifests itself in real time in sounds generated among people. Corollary: Notation is not music, but the record of music. Music theory is not music, but rather a systemized way to analyze it. Second premise: People tend to attribute to musical experiences both ...


3

It is about talent, dedication, concentration, familiarity with the culture, capacity of brain-muscle coordination and ability to self-criticize. There are many examples of incredibly successful performers and musicians in other genres then classical music, who start playing instruments quite late like 15-20 years old. One reason for that is the classical ...


4

It depends on how you use your practice time, your tenacity, creativity, business acumen, opportunities you create, and good ol' fashioned LUCK. More practice is not necessarily better - use your practice time wisely. A strict concert pianist, where you travel the world and people listen to you play, is rare. Often pianists will have that be a part of what ...


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There is at least one example of a concert pianist who started when he was 14 -- Nicholas McCarthy, who as well as starting late, has the disadvantage of being born with only one hand! So it is possible. Do bear in mind that 99.9% of the pianists who start earlier than the age of 7, do not become concert pianists either.


0

Well personally for me I've been playing guitar4 months Now with no previous experience with instruments and I'm actually giving lessons too others. I play constantly and can learn most songs in a good 2 hours and master them by 4. It's all about practice practice practice. I write my own music as well and I tend to make up the best stuff when I'm not even ...


3

I'm all for studying with teachers, but if you want to take ownership of your musicianship you should also spend some time in self-directed study. Play along with the music you like to listen to on your iPod or whatever you use. You will feel lost at first but keep at it. Try different things and listen for whether it sounds good. Study chord ...


1

The important things about practising stuff is improving and learning. One experiment worth trying is taking it down three notches: pick out some stuff you already mastered some time ago. Now play it perfectly. Once you play it perfectly, record it and listen. Anything to improve left? You'll find as you retry "really easy" stuff and/or listen to ...


3

Tim's pretty much got it there, but I just wanted to add there I don't really think there is just one way you should learn. I've been playing guitar for over 10 years now, and I've met all sorts of different musicians who've learnt in different ways. It all comes down to personal preference, which can be daunting for a beginner because you don't know what ...


2

To an extent, it will rely on many different factors. How musical the student is, what other musical experience he has, what instrument it is, whether he's learning from music are several of them. Rather like a child reading from a book, a beginner can sound stilted, and not play fluently. If it's just one piece, the more times it's practised, the smoother ...


1

I'm not a medical doctor, but I am a middle-aged guy who's played both keyboard and guitar for years, and I have found that shoulder and back issues definitely affect the way my hands and forearms feel, to the point that whenever my fingers tingle or my forearms ache, I reflexively think about keeping the shoulders back and low and making sure my posture is ...


5

1. Stop Playing 2. Go to the Doctor Seriously, your health is more important than your studies and your playing. Why potentially damage a half century of playing guitar and your career to save a few hours? What you describe doesn't sound trivial to me and could be indicative of something more serious that could affect all areas of your life, not just your ...


4

I don't know the answer but I feel for you - but seriously: See a doctor!! This is your health you're talking about, and although it might not seem so at the moment, that's much more important than your exams. I know you can get pain in all sorts of weird places when your nerves are messed up, and back pain may be a factor in that, but I'm no doc. It may be ...


2

I had a great experience as a TA for Dr. Gary Karpinski. His method, which I truly believe will always work for any diligent student, went roughly as follows: Learn to identify m2 and M2 intervals (these are the only two intervals that he teaches students to memorize, and this skill leads to a functionally harmonic ear training education based on movable ...


2

Your recognition of intervals needs to be done in reference to tonality. It is pointless and ineffective to try to train to train your ear by picking "random intervals" that don't have any relationship to the movement of a melody or a chord progression around a tonal center. With this in mind, the best way to begin your ear training is to pick 20 or 30 ...


1

I would suggest investigating college music school ear training textbooks and course material. All students in music college around the world take one or two years of ear training classes, typically for one hour, two or three days a week. Any college textbook or method will give you lessons in careful, methodical order from the easiest progressing on to the ...


0

Internet video lessons are an amazing resource - whether free or paid - and good ones will show you great technique plus you can watch over and over rather than get confused and have to wait until your next lesson to check with the tutor. The main thing you miss is someone watching you and noticing the things you are doing wrong. But "online" doesn't have ...



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