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0

The name I was looking for is Gary Chester, and its not a technique, its a method of trainning on hit-hat.


0

Here is a technique that appears similar to what you are asking about. The person who originated the technique is Sanford Moeller and it is now known as the Moeller Technique. It has been extensively taught by a drum teacher named Jim Chapin. You will find many YouTube videos on using the Moeller Technique. Here is a video of someone demonstrating ...


0

I have seen some great answers here, but I would like to add something about scales that comes from an improvisational standpoint: When you improvise, you have an arsenal of melodic ideas at your disposal that you can relate to the harmony. In this context, the scales may serve you as two really important things: A folder to file your musical vocabulary ...


0

Quality over quantity, but quantity is nonetheless still important. When playing fast pieces especially, one relies a lot on muscle memory, so it's important to imprint the right kind of muscle memory instead of just your default playing-- you want to slow down here, press lightly here, lift ever so slightly here, etc. Slow and deliberate practice that ...


1

Piano is like math-- before you get to do the fun things like Calculus, you need to learn your basic operations and algebra. Foundation is very important, especially since you seem to be a first-time musician. You also need to build up finger dexterity and strength; sure, you may be able to "read" the music you want to play, but your technique is probably a ...


1

I think our colleagues gave you really good answers and I wanted to add a little bit to them, even if it sounds a little exoteric or too outside the box. All this comes from my personal experience while learning to play the piano. At some point of my journey I understood that the most important thing is the music. The piano is just an instrument through ...


1

There are many paths to the mountain, but it the first steps you take can be very important. Keep in mind, there are many different kinds of piano players. I happen to admire Memphis Slim (see my user name.) I also admire any number of classical players. I love Dr. John, as well. These are just three reference points, but to get to any one of them, you ...


4

You probably don't mean playing more efficiently or effectively. You mean practising more effectively. That has a more rigorous meaning: learning skills faster, without learning anti-skills (bad habits: "practice makes perfect" is not as true as "practice makes permanent"). The number of skills is enormous: steady tempo, accurate leaping to a note, ...


4

One really good way to practice is to play only two or four bars at a time and master them in progression instead of stumbling through the whole song repeatedly. Even though it is much less interesting when practicing, this method gives you opportunity to learn what mistakes you are making and correct them before muscle memory takes place and becomes much ...


1

The #### circled in red in your answer are the key signature. YOu can read this as "four sharps", that stand for E Major (or C# minor). Basically all F C G D in the score are sharp, no matter in which octave. The simplest case is No Sharps/No flats (C Major / A Minor), in that case all notes are natural.


6

Yes they do because they are the key signature of a piece. The key signature tells you what key you are in and what notes to expect. Since you are in the key of E major, you will most likely use the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# which the four sharps represent. Those are the notes you should use unless a different accidental is applied to a note.


4

Assuming that your teacher isn't terrible, she probably isn't giving you 'randoms' - she's probably trying to go through a progression of work that builds up your technique, and she's naturally reluctant for you to jump ahead and learn bad habits. Having said that, there's everything to gain in music by not having just one perspective, so if you are itching ...


0

I learnt on a combination of electric guitar and nylon-string guitar. Electric guitar : I tried very thin strings, size 08 which helped with lowering the tension of the string, so even though they're thinner, the cut into my fingers less. Nylong string guitars : The strings are much thicker and don't hurt as much. I de-tuned it by quite a lot so that I ...


0

Here's my fifty cents... When I started learning 8 finger tapping (both hands on the fretboard) I had to go through the pain again, so I searched on the net about tricks on how to develop callouses faster and what I found is Eric Clapton's tip on it. He said: Deep your fingers in alcohol, it will dry out the fingers blah blah... So I tried that, within a ...


1

For me, what @Rob said is crucial: stop before it hurts If you overdo the practice before you can take it, the next day you'll be unable to play. And if you don't keep practicing regularly, you're more likely to not play the next day, and then another, and then a week after you're back at spot 0. Practice as much as you can without discomfort, then ...


1

Tell them: Practice 10-15 min 2x/day (they don't know a lot to play yet, and their fingers will hurt if they play more. As they learn more and their calluses develop, they can play more. Stop before it hurts Make it fun Set goals Reward yourself for reaching goals Balance "technique" and "fun" Have them record themselves & e-mail it to you (if a child) ...


0

Not a good idea. You wouldn't learn how to fly a plane or operate on someone via online course. Studies say that playing a musical instrument involves more brain cells than flying a plane or performing surgery.


2

OK, would you like an autodidact's viewpoint? I started teaching myself composition over 40 years ago. For becoming adept in music theory, @user18957 is entirely correct: there isn't a king's road. Even growing up on King's Road didn't help. (Joke, but that really was the name of the street on which we lived.) There isn't going to be a systematic way of ...


0

If you are looking to be an expert or guru, change your major from Computer Science to Music. Why do people think that music theory is something you can achieve without the same dedication one would put into any other subject? You mention all these great composers and how to analyze them. Change your major at school. This question is similar to someone else ...


2

A guru is characterized by broad knowledge acquired and tied together by an individual's urge for exploration not matched by others. It's somewhat like asking for a list of past and future games you should be watching and bullet points to address in order to become a raging fanatic for a particular soccer team. Now even if you ask a particularly raging ...


7

It isn't entirely clear from your question whether you're fluent in reading Western music notation and if you're conversant in the (relatively) standardized vocabulary for Western harmony and melody. If not, a first place to begin investigation might be Joseph Straus's Elements of Music. It begins with how to read notes, then moves on to keys, scales, meter, ...


9

I actually studied music composition and computer science myself. Great combo! It sounds like what you are really looking for is a formal music composition program, so, first of all, I would say that if this is something that really interests you, and you have the time and the means, you should look into trying to study music through your school, either by ...


1

Not a musician, but like you coming from computer science and playing ( sort-of ) with DAWs. I think this book you surely will find useful: http://www.amazon.com/Harmony-Fifth-Edition-Walter-Piston/dp/0393954803


1

I guess there are instruments, where the online approach is more difficult. For sure the double reed instruments fall into this category, where every so often my teacher says: 'Let my try that reed', and after short diagnosis resorts to the tools. In the initial phase I would strongly advise against it - I tried learning bassoon on myself (i.e. even ...


3

To add to these great answers, I only have one suggestion - climbers chalk Moisture in the hands leads to blisters. Chalk alleviates moisture build up in the hands and helps to build callouses. Some notable guitar players who use chalk before every show: Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, John Mayer, etc. Chalk is a great when you haven't played in a while and don't ...


1

Practice, practice, practice. Callouses do not form otherwise. Play until you can't bear it any more. Do this every day. Just get it over with. It will pay off in the end, I promise. In the meantime, there are ways of maximizing your practice time while your fingers develop into battle-hardened. Play lower strings more often. Note these are thicker ...


0

Don't worry too much about music theory yet. Start off by learning music notation. If your goal doesn't include improvisation, why do you need to know what scales fit what chords?


0

I think that every one has his/her own God given talent. There is a difference between someone who has the talent to play drums and someone who, by one way or the other, learns the skill. The person who God has given the talent will find it easier to play than the other who learned it from somewhere. I have an example to back thus up: in the Holy Bible, God ...


4

Learning the guitar as a beginner has many inherent challenges from the very start. For one, you are asking the new guitar student to teach their brain how to tell their fingers to contort in very strange and unnatural ways that they have never before even remotely contemplated. And the finger strength needed for many chords has not been developed yet. ...


1

In my experience, here are the essentials: Progressions. Know your I, IV and V chords for all major keys cold. If not for all keys, in all the common keys you play: E, A, D, G, C or whatever else you do. Relative minors (minor vi chords) are probably just as important. Scales. There are dozens of kinds of scales, but majors and minors are essential and ...


2

First off, you need to understand what music theory actually is. Wikipedia defines it as: Music theory considers the practices and possibilities of music. It is generally derived from observation of how musicians and composers actually make music, but includes hypothetical speculation. Most commonly, the term describes the academic study and ...


3

but is reading the bass clef necessary? Rhythm seems rather useless also. Cough, cough. In baroque times, accompaniment was written down by writing down the bass line and rhythm and putting numbers for the type of chord/harmony to be played above the bass line. While the numbers are gone these days and replaced by explicitly writing out the right hand, ...


2

What are some of the essential music theory concepts to memorize? If the subject matter is taught in a intellectually engaging manner then it is rarely needed to make theory an issue of memory. I'm confident in reading the treble clef, but is reading the bass clef necessary? Yes. you will find it useful to be able to read bass sheet music. ...


0

You are correct. Practicing scales only teaches you finger control and technique. It doesn't teach you anything that doesn't come from playing music. For example, if you play a bunch of melodies (and chords) in the key of C major, you are going to learn the C major scale whether you consciously realize it or not.


1

It is more essential to be able to hear (recognize exactly) and to sing everything you learn than to memorize it. Music theory is only a structured way of thinking about music. If you are not able to hear what you are thinking about then it is merely words and ideas, not music. Learn to hear and sing intervals, then 3 and 4 note chords, then chords with ...


3

Being a great player doesn't always equate with being a great teacher. World champions have coaches; if the coach was that good, why isn't he the world champion? Often a good player is naturally gifted, and finds things so easy that he can't understand why his pupils struggle. Empathy is something a teacher needs. Being on the same wavelength as his pupil ...


2

You seemed to have answered your own question. My past experience has taught me to avoid people just out of college, but even among the experienced teachers, there is a huge range of abilities, both in skill in music and in teaching. Hard to argue against such an open minded statement. Yes, some inexperienced teachers are bad. Some are good. Some are ...


4

First, and most importantly, identify what your goals are. What genres do you want to play? Do you want to play solo? Do you want to join a band? Do you want to be able to pass exams? Anything else you'd like to accomplish with your playing? Talk to prospective teachers about all of these things, and ask about their history: If you want to play in ...


0

A person who cannot speak Finnish can still look at the letters and speak words that are similar to what Finnish sounds like. Until you learn what makes the language ticks then you are never going to understand what the words mean.


2

My past experience has taught me to avoid people just out of college, but even among the experienced teachers, there is a huge range of abilities, both in skill in music and in teaching. Why exactly? What sorts of questions should I ask a prospective teacher? What are some warning signs I should look to avoid? What are some signs that ...


2

If you just learn how to play songs then when it comes to writing one you're solos, harmonies, melodies and chords will be all over the place. When you learn a scale, you know what notes "belong together" which enhances your written piece. Also, if you learn the scales of the songs you learn, you can learn to improvise which in the long run builds technique ...


0

Practice makes permanent - my highschool band director. Play it slow and purposeful. Take it from someone who always wanted to play it fast. The brain seems to have two approaches to getting good at something. One approach is to become "passably good," and the other is to become "the best you can be." As you spend more time in music, you'll find that ...


0

I read once that "running downhill" prepares your body and mind for what it will be like to (eventually) run quickly. I was a firm believer in "play slow and correctly, gradually speed up"... well I still am. HOWEVER I did not make the jump to playing lighting fast until I FORCED myself to. I joined a thrash/tech/grind metal band and at first I objected ...


1

What benefit can you get from practicing the alphabet that you can't get from just reading a book? What benefit can you get from practicing maps that you can't get from noticing what's out the window when you're driving? Consider these two absurd notions I have brought forth, and I hope you will arrive to answer your own question.


1

Are you seriously suggesting you should practice playing it WRONG? :-) Play at the speed you can play it right. Then sleep on it. The result will show tomorrow.


15

In addition to the other answers, I believe it improves the ability to simplify the music in your mind. Researchers studied the memory of chess experts and found they could recall the positions of almost all the pieces when placed in positions typical of a game, but did no better than amateurs when the pieces were placed randomly. For me, at least, the ...


2

Two topics I want to hightlight beause I have not read them in other answers: Music is very far from uniformly distributed random notes. Especially for instruments as clarinets, the keys are also very much biased. So the scales at least guarantee, that no note hides in the shadow and that all notes get equal attention. You need a (I would even say: very) ...


2

I would separate the sense of rhythm from the distinct skill of limb-independence. What you are actually trying to achieve right now isn't timing, or rhythm, it's the separation of one task [hands] from another [feet] With no sense of rhythm whatsoever, you can practise patting your head & rubbing your stomach… then swap hands! Once you can do that ...


7

Scales teach you... Knowledge of music: They are the ABCs of music literally. Scales contain the building blocks of music. Understand them and you understand allot about music and music theory. Having practiced scales for years has also made me better at musicianship (note/interval recognition when listening). The ABCs are there in a different way when you ...



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