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You probably don't mean "legato" as much as you mean "arco" (namely bowed as opposed to plucked). Yes, using pizzicato and arco next to each other is quite possible as violinists don't necessarily put aside the bow when doing pizzicato. Paganini even combines bowing with simultaneous left-hand pizzicato (of course, this needs careful consideration of ...


3

Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


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There isn't really much of a difference. When you shift slide on the guitar, you are trying to get the note as fast as you can while still making it noticeable that you shifted your hand by hitting the notes in between. Shift slides are generally rather fast while a glissando can be drawn out. Glissandos on guitar (and other instruments too such as piano ...



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