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You say I can only solfege (moving-do) in my head up to about Allegro 16ths at best Congratulations. That's more than enough for most purposes. I am not sure you need more but adapting the note names to your language basic phonemes is a very good idea. Constructing a dodecaphonic version of note names is fun too. But good luck to evangelize it. I would ...


2

As suggested in my comment on the question, it seems to be a German key naming convention. If you look at http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-Moll they call it "c-Moll" (note lowercase) or "c" (note lowercase) or "Cm". In contrast: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-Dur is called "C-Dur" (note uppercase) or "C" (note uppercase). In other words: c-Moll vs ...


2

If you actually write out "C major" and "C minor", then there's no need to further distinguish them via capitalization; your meaning is already clear. So I agree with Raskolnikov in the comments that "C/c" is useful when you drop "major/minor" altogether. However, to make it more clear, I usually use and see used "C" (or rarely "CM") for the major and "Cm" ...


2

I still see it applied for modes in chord notations, and it echoes the use of the distinction of M/m for Maximum and minimum in mathematical shorthand. It might be a kind of political correctness: all modes are created equal, they should not be typographically discriminated. None of them should have an initial uppercase when others have only lowercases, c ...


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I think it comes from the German practice as well, since German musicians were quite the standard-setters up to the 19th century. That said, even though it's implied in the 'shorthand' notation that C represents a major and c a minor chord, I prefer to use C and Cm when writing, for absolute clarity. The 'shorthand' notation, however, still pops here and ...


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I have constructed my own solfege system at http://toneme.org which simultaneously handles relative and absolute solfege, including accidentals. Each utterance consists of a consonant phoneme followed by a vowel phoneme. The consonant represents the pitch class, and the vowel represents the function. Please note that the website is several years out of ...



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