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19

Maple boards are typically placed on Swamp Ash or brighter wood bodies and it lends a snap to the tone of the guitar. Rosewood is known to be much mellower, and usually makes it's way on mahogany bodies and necks. They definitely feel different too. A maple neck is harder and feels very smooth under your fingers, while rosewood has some sponginess to it due ...


16

The wood type in any stringed instrument matters a great deal, especially on acoustic instruments. Some parts of the violin contribute more to the overall tone quality than others, but all the parts make a difference. A stringed instrument is a case study in engineering trade-offs. After all, how does a violin produce its sound? To begin with, note that ...


12

Birdseye maple is a cut of wood from one of several types of hard maple, most commonly Acer Saccharum. The only real difference between birdseye and regular hard maple is the figure, which doesn't really do anything to the tone of the wood. It's still as bright as any other type of maple. Scientists really have no clue as to why the figure occurs, but we ...


12

When converting a fretted instrument to fret less you have a couple of options if you want to DIY: Modify the current fingerboard in some way. This includes purchasing a fret-puller like @ekaj suggests, pulling out all the fretwires, and filling in all the fret slots with wood putty. Unfortunately you will suffer from the issues that @Alex mentions in that ...


12

The main advantage of neck-through construction is better sustain, achieved through greater stiffness. It's all about maintaining the string's energy as long as possible. Why does a guitar string lose its sustain? Why doesn't it keep vibrating forever? When you pluck a string, you impart energy to the string, and that energy keeps it vibrating. But some ...


11

If your wife is a violinist there are many things than can be transposed from violin to cello in the search for quality. Don't forget the bow. There are so many things... I will try to make a real answer in the coming hours and days by editing this one, I feel I have not yet touched 1/10th of what should be given. But first, have you considered renting? ...


9

I think the key is going to be two fold: Play, play, play. You've got to play a couple of guitars from the luthier. While the guitar almost certinaly won't be what you are looking for, you want to look at build quality. Check out the neck, ask to look at the electronics, etc. If his other guitars are good, the chances that yours will be are good too. Talk ...


9

The lines illustrate the bracing... Special made wooden braces glued on the top and bottom of the guitar, inside the body of the guitar. Without bracing, the construction would not be strong enough for the tension of the strings and various forces/impacts from everyday useage. The bracing has an effect on how the top and bottom of the guitar vibrate in ...


7

Mahogany guitars are generally heavier, with alder being quite light. Because of this, alder gives a light bright sound, and Mahogany gives a deeper Les-Paulier sound. Of course it depends what sort of guitar the wood is used in. Semi-hollowbodies and semi-acoustics are generally a bit lighter than solid-body guitars.


7

I would strongly advice getting a book for this, as there are many steps and you will want a complete thorough step by step guide. I would suggest reading through the book before starting the project. This way you wont get any nasty surprises in the middle of building. I don't think you will find a good enough source online (at least for free) to make a ...


7

The majority of sound from an acoustic guitar is produced by the sound board (or 'top'). The soundhole allows the sound waves generated at the inside face of the soundboard to escape the body. With all else being equal, a guitar with only a sound hole in the side will be quieter from the front but probably louder to the player. Any difference in tone ...


7

There is no specific combination of wood types that make a guitar more or less appropriate for rock/metal music. Essentially all combinations can and have been used to good effect by various artists in these genres. Other features besides the type wood are likely to have a more significant effect on the the behaviour of the guitar; at most you could ...


6

I have made a couple and it isn't that difficult...but in saying that it does depend on exactly what you want to build. Acoustic guitars - really hard work, as every decision will have impact on tone, so I'll just talk about electrics:-) We have discussed winding your own pickups - doable, but probably not a good use of your time. Necks - can be very ...


6

I would also add that the species of woods used is only part of the equation. The quality of each piece of wood makes a huge difference. A builder will go through many pieces of maple or spruce from a lumberyard to select only the logs or planks of wood with the highest quality for making instruments. They will reject the vast majority of the wood as only ...


5

Short answer: for an electric cello, there is no basic difficulty in playing left-handed apart from the bridge and the nut, if you have already learned the cello left-handed. Most electric cellos feature a wood bridge, and its arc shape and groves correspond to the fingerboard's shape and string gauges. The main custom thing you will need is the bridge but ...


5

This answer is specifically about acoustic guitar sound board grading as as that's what your question refers to, there are other grading systems for other instrument building woods. Different wood grades do not affect the tone. Soundboards are graded on aesthetic properties: straightness of grain, grain spacing, angle of quartering, degree of figuring, ...


4

I'm not sure how "from scratch" you want to be. If you find yourself in over your head starting from say, a large tree and a mound of iron ore, you might want to look at some kits or components.


4

Just to add to @mrbuxley's great answer: Unless you have access to some serious equipment this is going to be a very expensive and time consuming venture ;). You might be better off purchasing a pre-made neck and body from a reputable manufacturer such as Warmoth and then assembling all the parts yourself. The fun part about this (well for me anyway) is ...


4

There's been a lot of advice to buy a ready made neck, and if your woodworking skills aren't top notch that is a very good plan to begin with, but if you want to get a little more adventurous you can buy pre-slotted fretboards from some places like stewmac which takes a big part of the pain out of the equation, especially if you want to do something ...


4

The most important wood is that direct path from the nut to the bridge, so in many cases you can remove extraneous wood. That being said, resonance can be affected, especially if there are hollow areas, so don't overdo it. With the ones I have made, you could remove all the wood beyond a centimetre or so either side of the strings...if it wasn't for the ...


4

Electric guitar sound is affected, among other things, by the way the wood absorbs the vibrations of the strings. The sustain and the brightness of the sound comes, in part, from the wood used. Availability, workability and visual properties are also important. The most popular rock guitars are Fender Stratocaster and Gibson Les Paul. Strat bodies are ...


3

One difference is how you treat and care for one or the other as a guitar owner. Maple fretboards are usually varnished with the same finish (nitrocellulose, polyethylene, or other finishes) used on the rest of the neck. Thus they are sealed. Rosewood fretboards have no finish on them, and should be treated periodically with a wood conditioning oil. Also, ...


3

In his answer Alex mentions that "you want the violin to be as light and resonant as possible, it also has to withstand the significant string tension". In the book Materials Selection in Mechanical Design by Michael F. Ashby there is a table showing the relative strength and density of different materials: This is then tailored to violin use by Dr ...


2

I have seen this question asked many times in different forums, I have observed that there is no checklist. Having said that, you really need a checklist to decide whom to choose. You need to do a bit/lot research for that. Visit guitar forums like AGF, OLF etc. to familiarize yourself about the state of the art of Luthiery world and shortlist the luthiers ...


2

Yossarian has certainly nailed the important points. Look, you're deciding to go the luthier route for a reason: you're looking for something special. The great thing about luthiers is that they make bespoke instruments, even when they have set models you can tweak it to suit. You're looking at $4000+, so it pays to spend some time thinking what the ...



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