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1

The answer above pretty much covers everything, but another good thing to watch for is the pattern of the wood. The wood on the back of a cello is usually made of maple, which is generally considered the best type of wood for stringed instruments' backs, sides, or sometimes necks. The highest quality maple wood will have lots of "flames". These are ...


1

As already said, this will completely change the tuning on all frets. So, the only way this could be usable is if you want to play in a tuning other than the western standard 12-edo. If you move the bridge only slightly, the lower frets will still make up an approximately equal-tempered tuning, just with another step size. Making the scale a bit shorter ...


2

The fret spacing (distance of each fret from the saddle) is very precise for any given scale length. Many guitar manufacturers stick with common scale lengths so they don't have to constantly re-calculate the fret spacing. But the scale length varies between guitar builders and some even offer options for different scale lengths. Moving the bridge even ...


0

You could possibly get this to work by having a temporary bridge - possibly just a piece of wood with an acoustic guitar saddle strip - resting on the belly of the guitar. It would be held in place by the string tension. It would be necessary to take out the existing bridge saddles etc. The rest of the bridge would remain to anchor the strings. It would ...


6

Not only would your fretted notes play flat, but as you go further up the fretboard, the flatter your notes will get!


4

All the notes would play flat (lower in pitch). The 12th fret (for example) should normally be halfway along the string, so that it sounds an octave higher than the open string. If the bridge saddle is further from the 12th fret than the nut is, the 12th fret would play a pitch lower than the octave above the open string.


1

The answer is "yes", because virtually every part of an electric guitar affects the quality of the sound to some degree. Electric guitarists agree that the selection of woods in the body, neck and fingerboard make significant differences in timbre (the distinguishing characteristics of the tone and sound). (When we talk about the characteristics of the ...


1

The wood used in a electric guitar will add body to the pure vibrating string sound. My luthier once told me that the wood you use is like a landscape and the pickups are like windows through which you observe it. If the landscape has some beautiful sections, but your window can only let you see the ugly portions of it, you have a problem. The strings are ...


1

I would like to this add up to Mark's and the other's answers as a comment but I dont have the rep for it :) My addition is: Check all frets for chocking, it might be due to a faulty neck or due to a bad setup. So check the neck straight down and see if it seems reasonable, eg if bended backwards it would make sense that first frets might chock but if the ...


2

If we separate out the effects you could see, The body/neck wood could absorb energy from the strings, causing the sound to decay faster (and with preference for certain frequencies) The body/neck wood could then retransmit energy back into the strings, again possibly with preference for certain frequencies due to resonances in the wood The body/neck ...


2

You seem to have done a little research on what the particular model Fender Guitar in question should sell for. And from your question, it appears that you have some concerns about why this one seems to have been on the market for some time. While the other answers offer good general advice about assessing the condition of a particular guitar, my answer ...


5

There are a few things you might not be able to check easily when you go to see it: Whether the truss rod works. Even if the action and setup seem perfect, do you know that the neck's truss rod will respond properly when you change to heavier strings, or decide that you want to play with a higher or lower action? Whether the guitar picks up electrical ...


8

Check the neck for bowing, twisting, and any other defect. Also check the action on the neck. Check play every fret on each string and be sure that they all ring purely and that they don't squeak out. Check if the frets are worn down, which could cause squeaking. Check the intonation (play a harmonic on the 12th fret, then play the same string with the ...


4

My name is Bruce Rubin of Rubinsguitars.com The soundboard grading system is based on cosmetic appearance and closeness of the grain. When a well-crafted soundboard is produced by a skilled maker, He will balance that specific top to resonate based on the characteristics of that specific piece of wood. My experience has shown me cosmetic appearance has ...



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