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36

Depends on two factors: What are the strings (what are they made of) How much do you play Some strings, like "bright bronze", can lose their sound qualities after a few hours of playing. Others, like "silk and steel", can be played for 100 or more hours. The correct answer is: when you feel that sound isn't bright as it used to be, it is time to change ...


21

With traditional, barrel-style, Telecaster saddles the answer is: you can't. It's not possible and living with that imperfection is part of the Telecaster's ancient allure and charm. It's a grizzled old plank that barely stays in tune and you like to beat on to make beautiful music. If it's really driving you nuts you can buy compensated saddles for ...


19

Intonation refers to the instrument being in tune along the fretboard. An easy way to check the basic intonation of a guitar is to hit a 12th fret harmonic and compare the pitch with a note fretted at the 12th fret. If the fretted note is sharp, the string needs to be lengthened. If the fretted note is flat, the string needs to be shortened. The length ...


15

It depends on how you keep the guitar; the higher the humidity the more likely the strings are get get rusty and tarnish; in fact the whole guitar needs extra care in those conditions; good rule of thumb is if the guitar is not to be used keep it in a dry place at room temperature in a case if possible. If you keep the guitar in good conditions the strings ...


13

It's used for re-moisturizing and preserving the guitar's fretboard. If you don't apply some type of fretboard oil (like lemon oil) every year or so, you'll notice the fretboard getting dried out. Also, this oil isn't typically used to clean the fretboard, it's just used for moisturizing. You'll want to clean off your fretboard before applying the oil, ...


13

Call the airline beforehand and explain your situation. Policies vary. See if the aircraft(s) has a suit closet up front which can stow your guitar. It will not fit in the overhead unless you are very lucky, especially with a hardcase (forget it), and it unfairly denies other people their luggage space. (Others have said they got theirs in, hardcase and ...


12

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in this, yet try to make an attempt to summarize what I know on this subject. What does Grease consist of? Grease consists mainly of dirt, dust and sweat. Dirt and dust consist of human skin cells, plant pollen, human and animal hairs, textile fibers, paper fibers, minerals from outdoor soil, and many other materials which ...


11

An important thing to note is the different types of valves can be changed independently of each other; eg: if you change the preamp valves you need not change the power amp valves etc. With power amp valves you will notice very quickly when one or more have gone. The amp will give out noticeable and unpleasant tones/white noises and will be reduced in ...


11

Buzzing is almost always caused by a string vibrating against a fret. This could be due to a worn spot on the fret you are pressing on, which results in the string being lower at the point of fretting and higher, unworn frets being in the path of vibration. Finding out which fret is the culprit can be done with a straight edge, but I recommend that you take ...


11

Although the general principles are pretty much the same (set the relief of the neck, set the action of the strings, adjust the intonation, etc.), the short answer to your question is to set it up the best you can and learn to play the low B with a lighter touch. The longer answer involves scale length and string tension. What Is Scale Length? The scale ...


11

There are two different ways that the middle pedal on American pianos works. This pedal is called the "Sostenuto" pedal and, unlike the Sustain pedal, does not sustain every note on the piano. This website gives great videos and explanations of each piano pedal. On higher end pianos, the middle pedal (Sostenuto pedal), sustains only those notes which are ...


10

There are a couple of things you can do; raise the action of the strings; this might not be ideal for you. So the better option is to lower the height of your pickups; most pickups are height adjustable using the screws on either side of them. Ensure you have identified the correct screws before attempting this, and go slow don't try and force the screws. ...


10

I pretty much agree with everything in that video, except not everyone is as lucky to have an automated winder :) So here is what I do (on an acoustic guitar, anyway): After removing the old string and fitting the new string: I slide the end of the string through the post, until it is taut, and then pull it back so that it has 1-2 inches of slack. I then ...


10

I would like to add a little bit of info when it comes to strings, action, and intonation. Whenever setting up/recalibrating a guitar, set the action of the strings first, depending on what your personal preference is. - How you do this depends on your model of guitar, but there should be a screw or something else that adjusts the height. - Remember, if ...


10

I don't have the reputation to comment on DRL's answer (but I can and have upvoted it), but it describes exactly the method I've used for almost 40 years with no problem on electric and acoustic guitars. On my classical guitar, I don't pull the strings; I just retune several times until the strings stretch themselves out. No tools required.


9

As long as you are following good maintenance practices, then no, the only added risk of damage comes from the instrument not being in a protective case. (Hopefully the instrument isn't sitting on a stand long enough for it to collect dust.) Of course, on a clarinet, part of good maintenance practice is swabbing out the moisture after every playing session, ...


9

Every once in a while, I polish the main body with a soft cloth to remove dust and smudges. When changing strings I give the fretboad, headstock and pickup areas a good cleaning. A can of compressed air is a good idea for removing dust and other gatherings from tight crevices like the gaps between the pickups and body. Make sure you hold it at least 6 - 8 ...


9

Thicker gauge strings do require more tension in order to maintain the proper pitch associated with standard tuning on a guitar--but it's nothing that your guitar isn't already designed to handle. Over a very, very long period of time the tension of those thicker strings could cause some damage, but it's likely that you will have retired the guitar before ...


9

There are a couple of simple things you can do depending on how severe the frets are hanging. First off, if there's a good bit of fret visibly hanging off the board, check into a fret wire cutter like this one from StewMac. Make sure to watch the video on that page for simple instructions on how to use it. If there's just a tiny bit of fret wire hanging or ...


9

Usually when you restring an acoustic guitar, it will feel, and play, slightly different for a while. New strings that are fresh on the guitar tend to feel a little firmer and heavier to the fingers, but as time goes by they will start to feel a little less tense as they begin to stretch. Are you absolutely sure that they are the same gauge strings? The ...


9

You can look up string tensions in the D'Addario String Tension Supplement, however your scale length is not covered in their tables. They do, however, provide a general formula T (Tension) = (UW x (2 x L x F)2) / 386.4 .. where UW is the unit weight in lb/in, L is the scale length in inches, and F is the frequency of the note in Hz. Presumably if they ...


8

I have never heard the term 'tremolo' applied to higher pitched strings, but I will do my best to point you in the right direction when it comes to setups. First of all, when setting up a guitar, set the action of the strings first. How you do this depends on your model of guitar, but there should be a screw or something else that adjusts the height. ...


8

There seems to be a general agreement among the answers here that strings go through several distinct phases: New. Bright, Crisp, Harsh. However you describe it, new strings have more top-end. Worn-in. Like a broken-in pair of shoes, they don't cut your ankles anymore, but they still feel "pretty new". Seasoned. They've lost the "newness", but they're not ...


8

If you are talking about the actual fretboard between the frets, you'll need a soft cloth and typically lemon or bore oil, which will help remove the dirt. Along the fret, you'll need some kind of edge, wrapped in the cloth, to dislodge the cruft. Of course, you have to be careful not to scar the wood. If it's the actual fret you're talking about, protect ...


8

Intonation is all about notes being in tune along the fretboard. Frets are straight, so your guitar is pretty much always a little bit out of tune at any point down the fretboard. This is the reason you have compensation at the bridge and often the nut too. (Have a look at the bridge, the strings aren't all fixed at the same distance from the nut.) Some ...



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