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Your friend has heard something about old-fashioned longbows which must be unstrung after use. A yew bow will deform if it is left for a long time under full tension. Thus it becomes less useful as a bow. When it comes to guitars, they are designed to be under tension. In fact (depending on the type of instrument) the neck may form a reverse curve when the ...


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Leave it tuned, not only will the strings thank you for allowing them to 'settle in' to their proper tension (think of repeatedly bending a coat-hanger to break it) but the machine head gears will also not suffer as much slippage in the long run. The wood and glue is also better off staying under tension. The only time where all the strings should be ...


15

Imagine what chaos there would be in a guitar shop close to closing time every day! And even worse at opening time! Just smile sweetly at your friend, and let him carry on wrecking his guitar and wasting his time, but realise that actually you know far better and leave your guitar in tune for the next day. I've done it with about 20+ guitars for 50+ years, ...


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Yes you can. Actually periodically (day by day) tune and detune the guitar hundred times a year and thousand times by its lifecycle may harm your neck way with much greater possibility than leaving it alone. Tuning and detuning is always a kind of stress for the neck you do not want to do this unnecessary thousand times.


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I leave all ten of my acoustic guitars tuned all the time. In most cases it is not a problem to leave your guitar under the full tension of standard tuning for days or even weeks at a time. However, if you know you will be storing a guitar for an extended period of time (months) without playing it or changing the strings, it is probably a good idea to ...


3

Yes you can leave your guitar tuned over night and it is what most if not all guitarist do. The neck of your guitar should be able to take being in tune for a period of time and the tension put on it and if not, there are more serious issues with your guitar.


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An old question with many answers... but the one thing no-one seems to have mentioned is that the care & attention applied in the actual stringing process can considerably reduce the amount of stretching required. Method 1 - the sloppy way... Tuck the end of the string through the slot, then wrap as much of the rest as you can round the post before ...


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Kaz brings up an interesting point: Not returning to the original pitch indicates that the material has been extended beyond its elastic limit This is mostly true, which is why you'll notice that stretching the top strings doesn't do all that much. However the wound strings (typically the bottom 3 or 4) absolutely need to be stretched, because the ...


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The phrase goes "only one way to find out", and it needs to be treated with caution. Both drums and drum mics come in a large number of varieties and may, or may not, withstand that kind of punishment. It's potentially quite an exciting stunt on stage, but it comes with an element of risk. How willing are you to risk damaging your kick drum? How easily can ...


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Put simply: A drum is not constructed to hold a 175 lb person. It will not likely collapse, but could certainly go out of round, making it difficult or problematic to tune in the future. That drum is anchored by a couple thin stabilizers that are held by a pressure screw. It may be "rock and roll" to stand on the drumkit...and it's all good for the show, ...


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The front rim of most kick drums is very strong - a rigid metal circle - so standing on it isn't in itself likely to damage the drum. It also won't damage the mic, as it is usually on a low stand in front of the drum. However you are right that there are obviously safety concerns: You could fall backwards into the kit You could fall forwards and fall to ...


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It's not just about making the action higher or lower...it's also about getting the proper relief in the neck. The neck of a guitar isn't ruler-straight: it bends upward in a very slight gradual curve from the body to the headstock. If that curve is too flat you'll get pernicious buzzing, and if it's too fat you'll have strings too high and possibly ...


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If you're unhappy with the sound and playability that you're getting, it's definitely worth taking your guitar in for maintenance. Most guitars usually benefit from having a setup done at a guitar shop. Very few guitars come out of the factory with great playability. You should be able to get the action lowered and thus enjoy your guitar more. That extra ...



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