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It's easy to adjust this on an upright piano. Remove the front of the case below the keyboard and you will see an adjustment screw, probably a wing-nut close to the pedal. On a grand piano the pedal mechanism can be a bit more complicated, but simple for a technician to adjust. If you get different amounts of damping between the bass, mid range, and treble, ...


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This type of noise can be hard to track down, because it might not be coming from the piano at all. It could be almost anything in the room resonating at the pitch of the note. If your piano tuner changed the pitch, that's enough reason why the problem only started after the tuning. it's very hard to hear the direction the sound is really coming from, and ...


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You need to let the piano settle into its new environment before a second tuning. If the first tuning got it into concert pitch, it was already in tune from its last owner (my spinet took two tunings, 6 months apart to get it up to pitch after being neglected for 8 years) If nothing is touching the strings as others have suggested, a miniscule difference in ...


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Something rattling or resonating. Or just a bad string. It happens. Did you watch the piano tuner at work? Remember how he used felt or rubber wedges to damp two of the three strings of each note so he could concentrate on tuning each one seperately? You could do the same to pin the noise down to one string.


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There's a possibility of something touching the string; either some foreign body dropped in there & wedged against it, or even part of the mechanism touching the string. I'd recommend visual inspection first. Grab a torch, get the front off & go have a look. Very gently wiping down the length of the string with a lint-free cloth may help - be ...


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For years, I too wore frets out quite quickly. I learned how to refret my guitars because I couldn't afford to have it done every 6 months. ( I switched to using .008s for a while, while doing the below, because it required much less pressure. I also lowered the action on my guitar, to relieve the amount of pressure needed to clearly ring the note out. ...


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To complement @Dr Mayhem's perfectly good answer: Notes about the pressure you apply to the strings: Style makes a difference. You can get a better tone by pressing down harder and striking the string harder and using heaver strings. Bluegrass players notoriously like that heavy tone for example. You can achieve faster speeds with a lighter touch and ...


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Things that will fret wear fast: Lots of pitch bends / vibrato - these scrape the fret really quickly. I've almost lost the whole 9th fret on one of mine Pressing really hard - as you develop you'll be able to reduce the pressure needed. Once you improve your technique, you can ideally lower the action which helps you lower the pressure needed. In fact ...


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Dry the inside and use a separate, soft cloth to wipe down the outside. This removes oils and residue left by your fingers (and lips :-) ), thus helping maintain the instrument's finish. I would recommend always disassembling for two reasons. First, it's much safer in its case rather than being left (assembled) somewhere else. Second, you will want to ...


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A lack of humidity can cause this. There is a test for dryness to do on a guitar. Run your hand down the neck, not touching the surface of the fret board but on the edge or side of the fret board. If you can feel the frets, your guitar is most likely needing to be humidified. The purpose of this test is to determine if the frets extend past the width of the ...


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It's quite likely to be the strings themselves. They are sacrificial, in that they need changing to retain that brightness. Try a new set of strings, and wipe them down after each session, and you will hopefully get the 'zing' back. 'Several months' is as long as a lot of strings hold their brilliance for. Some players change each week, or less.



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