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having read all the answers here it seems this is another what came first , the chicken or the egg question . I don't feel anymore enlightened than I did before . I suppose to be on the safe side I'll change one at a time and clean the neck with a q-tip as I go.


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Loctite might help. You pour a little bit on the thread (having undone it a bit 1st so that when you do the screw up again, the loctite is pulled into the thread) and is prevents things vibrating loose. People use it on cars and models a lot. Loctite Homepage Thread locking section It allows you to undo the thread if you need to though. You can feel that ...


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First thing I'd do is swap round - takeout the offending screw , and any other one, and see what happens. If the screw is worn, it will behave the same in its new home. Replace it ! If the problem is still in the same place on the saddle, it will be the female at that point.Full solution - new bridge, Temporary solution - which may become permanent - use ...


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Moisture will make your strings corrode slightly more quickly, but this is inevitable because of sweat and moisture in the air. You should try to avoid playing with wet hands if you can, but in actuality I doubt it would make a significant difference unless you're consistently playing with wet hands. If this is the case, you can buy coated strings which are ...


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On occasions, a gig may be really hot and humid.You will sweat, so your hands will be damp. This is life. However, once you've finished, it's always best to dry the neck/strings and if there's no paint finish, the body with a cloth.Strings are not designed to last for ever, and they are usually metal, so will revert to rust as soon as possible, thus drying ...


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Dirt, oil, and moisture accelerate the wear on your instrument’s strings and finish. Wet hands will make your strings wear out faster and may damage the finish of your neck. Moisture will also soften your calluses and skin, so you may end up with the same kinds of soreness and skin damage that beginners get. It’s a good idea to play only with clean, dry ...


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This is almost certainly caused by a "cavity" on the silent part of the fingered e-string, resonating at a B frequency. Likely, it's the part between the nut and 7th fret (although the problem should already appear from 8th fret on then, not 12th). To test where exactly, finger one of the problematic notes and pluck the "wrong" part of the E-string at ...


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Straightening a guitar's neck is easy to do at home - if you know what you're doing. You took it to a shop, because you felt they knew the job better. Take it back, explain the problem. It may be they've adjusted it too far, it may be the guitar won't take all the adjustment, it may be it just needs the action tweaking.Whichever, the job's been paid for and ...


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My best guess says you have earthing problems. Try using a different power socket!



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