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1

The last time I played a guitar with a Floyd Rose is long ago, but I do remember having some unwinding problems in the beginning, too. Then I discovered, that some strings come with a bit of "unwinding protection" at the end (I don't know, if that's its official purpose, but what I mean, is a short, somewhat thicker part). The trick for me was buying the ...


1

All of those can put adverse pressure on the truss rod of the guitar and cause bowing. the reason being that the temperature change with the seasons, in combination with the humidity, can cause the wood to expand and contract causing bowing. when adjusting to a new string gauge go have your truss rod adjusted to the new tension. my best recommendation is ...


2

Loctite might help. You pour a little bit on the thread (having undone it a bit 1st so that when you do the screw up again, the loctite is pulled into the thread) and is prevents things vibrating loose. People use it on cars and models a lot. Loctite Homepage Thread locking section It allows you to undo the thread if you need to though. You can feel that ...


2

First thing I'd do is swap round - takeout the offending screw , and any other one, and see what happens. If the screw is worn, it will behave the same in its new home. Replace it ! If the problem is still in the same place on the saddle, it will be the female at that point.Full solution - new bridge, Temporary solution - which may become permanent - use ...


2

Moisture will make your strings corrode slightly more quickly, but this is inevitable because of sweat and moisture in the air. You should try to avoid playing with wet hands if you can, but in actuality I doubt it would make a significant difference unless you're consistently playing with wet hands. If this is the case, you can buy coated strings which are ...


4

On occasions, a gig may be really hot and humid.You will sweat, so your hands will be damp. This is life. However, once you've finished, it's always best to dry the neck/strings and if there's no paint finish, the body with a cloth.Strings are not designed to last for ever, and they are usually metal, so will revert to rust as soon as possible, thus drying ...


11

Dirt, oil, and moisture accelerate the wear on your instrument’s strings and finish. Wet hands will make your strings wear out faster and may damage the finish of your neck. Moisture will also soften your calluses and skin, so you may end up with the same kinds of soreness and skin damage that beginners get. It’s a good idea to play only with clean, dry ...



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