New answers tagged

0

I'm ganna drink f*** and fight right now. So chenge the saddle. If not I #### it now


0

You really don't want to adjust this by yourself if you are not a technician. There is a metal rod that runs across the neck, look through the sound hole and you will find it. You can adjust this with an allen wrench to curve the neck and so lower or raise the strings. Be careful here, because if you go too far you might ruin the neck. The technician can ...


0

Beyond what Dr. Mayhem suggests, there could be a minimum of how low your (electric guitar) bridge can go, and the solution there is to add a shim in the neck pocket on the bridge side. This changes the neck angle, which has a slight change at the neck but a great change at the bridge. It allowed me to get the action of my Telecaster very low. Of course, ...


2

When a guitar is built in the factory, after they install the frets into the fretboard, they should level them before the assembly is complete and the guitar is sent to the store to be sold. But sometimes a guitar with un-level frets might sneak through quality control. If you buy a new guitar and you immediately notice that the action is uneven on ...


2

When steel strings come in constant contact with softer nickel frets, eventually the steel strings take their toll. Over time, depending on how often you play, how heavy handed your fretting technique is and how much bending you do, your frets will begin to exhibit signs of wear as you have probably already discovered. Two common signs that your frets may ...


0

I have always been told to cut broken hairs off a bow (such as with scissors) rather than pull them out, as that will make the bow hair last longer before you need it replaced (that way the rest of the hair is less likely to fall out). I play at an advanced level and was recently told I should have my bow rehaired at least once a year. I doubt you need to ...


5

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all ...


1

If the string is pressed down all the way to the fretboard, it should not buzz. Not just right behind the fret in question but anywhere (right after the previous fret is a bit theoretical since it's rather hard to go all the way there so it's a bit of an irrelevant point). That's the basic balance between fret height and fingerboard. If it doesn't buzz ...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


-1

It a literal sense, yes they do. The second law of thermodynamics states that all things, left to themselves, move from a state of order to disorder. In the case of unused guitar strings, the atomic structure of the string will interact with its environment. Particulate matter in the air will come to rest on them. The energy from the local environment ...



Top 50 recent answers are included