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Others have already laid out good practical and technical advice, so my very general answer is that the trick (if you can call it that) is to be inspired. In my experience, if you sit down, whenever, and try to come up with a bunch of riffs, you can write a lot of them but you're going to think most of them are lame, unoriginal or otherwise "uncool". Now, ...


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I don't have to add a lot, because other users have said it, but here is another book suggestion, Figuring out Melody by David Fuentes. You can find it here. My advice is to sit down (ideally) every day and sketch a melody. One melody can seem to you like "meh, not really interesting" one day, but maybe after few months it could catch your interest when you ...


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That's not the case "in general". Take a look at Simon&Garfunkel, or typical polyphonic passages in Beatles songs. Also for barbershop, the melody tends to be in "lead" which is below the "tenor" voice. Now the counterexamples are actually a good clue for figuring out the rule: in those examples, the higher counter melodies are typically sung in light ...


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A complicated proposition to be sure: you are now wrestling with: What I've been taught doesn't fit for what I want to do. This is normal for everyone who writes music. Your patterns of articulation won't make any sense if they don't complement the way the phrase is written. The whole point of articulation is to articulate (see: "express") the line that ...


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Strong opinions ahead... Almost1 all *ahem* proper instruments will inevitably introduce some dynamic variations, because the player will (deliberately or involuntarily) hit each note a bit differently. And a good musician will intuitively get this “right”, whatever that means exactly (there will be more than one right way). Surpressing this ...



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