Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

There are 2 ways to do this and I'll explain each one. METHOD ONE: The Theory Approach This method can be good if you understand theory. I know this will seem like a shameless plug, but I literally just put together a series on this on my YouTube account: "Playing By Ear Playlist". I'm assuming that you may not have a theory background. If you don't, and ...


0

When I suggest learning some basic music theory, it can feel pretty daunting. Lessons may not be economically feasible, or the prospect of a lot of academic, math class type study seems like an opposite experience to the fun of making music. If that sounds like you, consider seeking out someone who plays a little better than you do. Ask if he or she is ...


2

I gather that we are talking about practicing. I think it is good that you notice these issues. There is another (related) can of worms to bring up, that sometimes it is good to separate your left hand and right hand practice on the guitar, depending on what you are trying to achieve.... Experience guides guitarists to recognize tricks that often aid the ...


0

It's more complex than just a melody and bass line - obviously a melody line exists whenever there is a vocal but the music could also be considered as a sequence of chords or as a bass plus multiple lines if you are playing multiple notes at once. The actual "bass line" isn't even shown on a guitar tab; you're only seeing what the guitar part for that song ...


1

It's difficult to tell which are the passing chords from your example because there's no time values. Passing chords are of short duration and/or occur on off-beats. So absent that, I would look at the chord tones for each to determine what melody to play. F#m: F# A C# ("color tones": E G# B D) F: F A C ("color tones": E G Bb D) Esus2: E B F# Ebm7b5: Eb ...


2

It is possible to have multiple keys in a song. Charles Mingus in 'Nostalgia in Times Square' changed 3 keys in as many bars. He used chromatic notes in the melody as well. So, don't try to narrow your progression down to only one possible key. Now, let's say you are in D major: F#m -> 3rd chord of the scale. F -> chromatic. The bass goes F# to F(natural) ...



Top 50 recent answers are included