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1

Old question, but I want to add to the answer... Assuming the music is tonal or in a key, I suggest analyzing the notes of a melody in four ways: rhythm - metric placement harmony - note relative to the chord (if a the melody is accompanied) tonality - relative to the key (or tonal center if perhaps the music isn't clear cut major/minor key) interval - ...


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One of the other answers gives a mixture of traditional ornaments like trill and mordent along with "passing tones." It's a nice list, but "passing tones" are only one type of "non-chord tone" (NCT) and I think a fuller list of NCT's should be given: Passing Tones Neighbor Note Suspension Anticipation Appoggiatura Escape tone Cambiata (or changing tones) ...


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I know this thread is old, but for people who find it via Google I want to add this article. It is fairly easy to read (theory-wise) and well researched. David Temperley, The Melodic-Harmonic Divorce in Rock http://theory.esm.rochester.edu/temperley/papers/temperley-pm07.pdf The gist of the paper is rock music has two melodic modes: one where the melody ...


3

From a "classical" perspective... I think you can find a lot of material on melody, but it won't be as neatly codified or as conveniently labeled as things are with modern harmony teaching. Maybe historic resources offer better insight into melody but aren't as codified as modern roman numeral analysis or Schenkerian analysis. Personally, I don't think this ...


1

You're asking about re-arranging the music and that is an artistic process, which no one else can tell you how to do precisely. If you're not sure where to begin, then: Learn to play the song that you want to re-arrange in the original style. Learn to play several songs in the style that you want to change the original song into. Get your beat going, then ...



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