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The characteristics of the piano as a percussive instrument and the singer as an expressive continuous-tone interpreter are different enough that countermelodies don't tend to work convincingly as they don't merge in character and interpretation with the main melody, even when singer and player aren't the same person. It's similar with guitar. With either ...


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You can play just supporting chords and rhythms. You can support the melody. You can "fill in the gaps" in the melody with melodic figures. You can play a complete counter-melody. The rule is to play sustained notes while the melody moves, be more active when it rests at the end of a phrase. All rules may be broken. You will probably decide to do a ...


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It's not a question if you should or not (obviously!), since music is free, unrestricted will. As far as i understood, according to your question you might be asking it differently "should i add a counter-melody?" or "is the first melody or counter-melody more effective?" Most important thing is to consider that the counter melody is a "second voice" in ...


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All diatonic modes are the same scale starting on different notes. While you can think of different modes for each chord, I find that approach to be way too complicated for live performance. Moreover, that approach tends to lead to playing scales rather than creating interesting and catchy melodies. Take the chord tones for each bar as your "strong" notes ...


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A melody is comprised of notes, usually from a particular key. Those notes could and often do, add up to the scale of that key, when put in order, with root first. Thus, in A, there'll be A,B,C#,D,E,F# and G#.So, a tune in A will use those notes in the main.Take any of those notes, and stack the next but one and the next but one to that, and maybe one more, ...


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That is totally a matter of style, given the combination you have there. If you wanted a Spanish guitar sound and kind of dark, use phrygian. If you want a jazzy/blues feeling, use Dorian. However, if you use Dorian with the minor chords toward the beginning of the progression, I would probably give Mixolydian a try on the major chord to maintain the bluesy ...


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In my experience, the best way to improve musical memory is to start small (that is, short). Find a 5 second clip of a melody that you don't know and listen to it as many times as necessary until you can sing it back. Then: Sing it to yourself a few times on "la." If there are words, sing it a few times with words. If there aren't words, sing it a few ...


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It gets easier if you can do a lot of analysis and comparison on the fly. If this part sounds like that, or makes use of such and such pattern, etc., then these extra bits of knowledge about the passage help reinforce the memory of it. If a passage makes use of some patterns you can "chunk" the passage into those patterns rather than having to remember every ...


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Harmony in general is a pretty broad topic and there isn't just one option for how to do harmony. In general, harmony is the simultaneous or "vertical" relation between what is being played. There is the typical Western idea of functional harmony where the Tonic-Dominant relationship (I-V) drives the progressions we encounter, but there is a lot more out ...



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