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7

I'm sure someone more experienced will come to help, but for now, here are some suggestions: Make use of dissonant chords. In particular, augumented fifths, and diminished major sevenths. In particular I'd just look into the various scale modes (e.g. Lydian) and pick out chords from there. If it's a slow horror song I'd suggest using a Dorian mode for ...


1

Melody in Songwriting, by Jack Perricone. It's the first thing I've seen that makes explicit all the things I was (usually) doing unconsciously.


1

Two books: Exercises in Melody-Writing. by Percy Goetschius. The Study of Counterpoint. by Johann Joseph Fux (translated by Alfred Mann)


0

I will not read all the above comments because they are waaay too long. Simple solution: learn modes, you will have way more room to write music. As for rhythm, you could watch Paul Gilbert's tutorial. It is for guitar, but can be applied for piano as well. ...


9

I think you're about right. Homophony is the concept of a single 'line' as such, potentially split across several parts, but all moving at the same time - parts mainly follow the same rhythm. Polyphony is when there is multiple melody lines at the same time, interacting with each other. What's important to remember is that there should be a degree of ...


1

Adding to Ben's great answer. Learn the chord shapes all over the neck. An 'E' shape gives you the tonic on the top string. So does a 'G' shape. A 'C' and 'D' shape give you a third on the top, and an 'A' shape will find the 5th on top. Those notes make up the major chord, which will give some of the main notes for most tunes. Playing them on the top string, ...


4

Sometimes just singing over a chord progression can do wonders. However a melody that sounds 'good' on vocals may flub on the keyboard (or other instruments). Try changing the chords under the melody - sometimes its easy to dismiss a decent melody because it wasn't in a very good context (chord substitution is a great way to go here). Try to identify what ...


2

First of all it takes a while to develop your ear and some pointed practice definitely helps. The short answer is use the tools at your disposal - usually your ear and maybe notation/tablature if you can find it for free/on the cheap. With that said it is GREAT practice to transcribe the melody by ear (Using looping software ain't cheating in my book but ...



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