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2

There are lots of techniques, tips, and tricks out there beyond the "How do you get to Carnage Hall?" answer so lets start a list. This one was super helpful for recognizing intervals (especially when I came up with my own set of mnemonics)


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I would say that at the very core of improv there lies the undercurrent of completion of a melody. Whether the great jazz / blues masters had any formal training in it does not take away from the fact that that is in essence what you are doing when you do improv. If you want to take the easier way to become proficient in completion of a melody I can really ...


4

I believe that the oft-cited analogy with learning a language is quite to the point. You need to learn (i.e., copy) words, phrases, and simple sentences, and after a lot of practice you will be able to form your own sentences and express what you want to convey. You can speed up that process from copying to self-expression by total immersion, i.e. by ...


1

I started looking into melodies that I've transcribed and found a few common themes such as: -7th degree always resolves to the 1st, 3rd or 5th degree of the scale -4th is most commonly resolved to 5th -The melody can end on a 2nd or 6th degree without too much tension You should certainly be thinking about things like that, so long as you ...


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If you're a beginner composer, I do not recommend thinking about these things while composing. Music Theory is very important to learn, but more often than not, breaking the rules can sound great and lead to very interesting compositions. However, to break the rules, you should first know the rules. I suggest if you're just getting started with composing ...


3

You will find that melodies that are "pleasingly consistent to genre" tend to also follow the "rules" of composition. The rules are empirically derived: meaning that they were derived from common practice, instead of common practice being derived from the rules. It is a very good practise to come up with a pleasing melody, then transcribe it, and review ...


0

you can play the d7 but with the C on bass , you play also the c7 M +11 as mentioned above ( with a tritone ! ) .


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Uh, is this a trick question? "Für Elise" is (at least regarding the well-known beginning) rather particular in its "accompaniment" in that accompaniment and melody line alternate (which makes it a nice beginners' piece since you don't have to focus on both hands at once) with the overlap provided by pedalling and with the arpeggiated line running from bass ...


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A piece of classical music will almost always have, at any given moment, a functional bass note that allows the current harmony to be heard in root position (root in the bass) or an inversion (some other chord tone in the bass). In this example, the bass line consists of the low notes at the downbeat of each measure, beginning A, E, A, which are also the ...


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It certainly can be. Historically though, the bass part (whether played by a bass or not) was often considered more of an arrangement detail than a composition detail. In "figured bass" notation, the bass part, while written, is considered to be largely improvisational.


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The natural tendency of a western-music-familiar listener is to hear the highest note in an arrangement as the melody note. Nobody tells people to hear it as such, they just do. Thus, for many years it was a standard "rule" for a big band arranger writing horn charts and such to put the main melody in the top voice. This is of course more a convention ...


0

In western music, (one should ALWAYS qualify that!) our familiar diatonic scale (do re mi fa sol la ti do) is based on the harmonic series and on the notes that are small-integer-ratios to the "tonic." The tonic note (do) is the note of the diatonic scale that is most at rest. Practically the whole of our western perception of melody is based on motion ...


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You have noticed that the bulk of Western music is tonal. There is a note that feels like home, like you've arrived to a restful place, called tonic. When you are playing a tune that is entirely in the key of C, C is tonic (the first degree of the scale). Some notes are a bit like homing pigeons -- tending to move toward home (tonic). The note that does ...


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I'm not sure if this is relevant, but have a read anyway. I believe that it was the Pythagoreans of ancient Greece (circa 6th Century BCE) who first formally studied the relationships between sounds, and specifically why some notes sound more pleasing together than others. They did this in the context of a vibrating string. You ask : Why do these ...


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One reason is habit: when you hear for the very first time a sequence of sounds (either a scale or a chord), it has very poor meaning and evokes very few feelings. I play guitar and when I learn a new type of chord or scale I "begin appreciating" it after a period of practice: I find a "meaning" for that chord or scale and I can insert it properly inside a ...


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There is only one thing you need. I am also a finger-style guitarist, but believe me, those major or minor scales help a little in finger-style guitar arrangement. What you need to practice is to learn how to play `do, re, me...´. If you are good at this, you can write down the melodies of the songs. In addition, try to read tonic solfa guitar notation a ...



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