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1

The opening section of Spanish Dance No 3, by Granados, I think provides a clear example of non-contrapuntal music. Notice how each of the different voices move in the same contour and the same rhythm. It's probably my least favourite of the 12 dances, but it's one you never forget because it is so rigid.


2

Counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically dependent, yet are independent in other aspects like in rhythm and shape. Counterpoint is only really observed in pieces that have multiple independent melodies or in other words polyphonic in nature. The example you are talking about is homophonic or consists of a distinct melody and ...


0

The strum pattern. Pattern is important. A pattern is something that repeats, so a strum pattern, specially in pop music, is going to be basically the same thing for each bar. Pretty well regardless of the rhythm of the melody. It needs to complement the melody, of course, but it rarely copies the melody rhythm. As joseem states, it's basically (in a 4/4) ...


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I would say there is not a direct relationship between the notes chosen for the melody and the strumming pattern that would be most appropriate for the song. They are two completely different elements of the music and are chosen by the composer independently. The rhythm and choice of notes used in the song or musical piece are but two of the many elements ...


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Generally speaking the strum pattern (and other accompaniment techniques) will depend more on the generic characteristics of the song (tempo, style, genre) and the effect you want to achieve than the particulars of the melody (although sometimes, for momentary effect, a particular combination of strummed chords and sung words may be used). For the most ...


2

The melody may be louder, or mixed 'drier' might be a distinct 'voice' type (e.g. male 'main' singer with 3 female backing singers) often changes note more often, while harmony notes may tend to change more 'with the chord' may be more inflected and ornamented may be freer in time, with the harmony following the beat more closely may be easier to follow ...


2

Before I answer your question, I think it will be helpful to explain "harmony". The melody of the song is conveyed via single notes. We often refer to chords that are played with the melody notes as the "harmony" part of the song. Dictionary.com has the following for the definition of "harmony": the simultaneous combination of tones, especially when ...


2

Working from your example: C and F are both part of the F major chord, so you can hold one F major chord for both of those notes. G and D are both part of the G major chord, so you could just hold a G major chord for both notes. So you would have F major, then G major. Another way to do it: F and D are both part of a D minor chord, so you could hold D ...


0

Depends quite a lot on genre. I'll explain my normal process as they vary so much you can't define a method. 1: Melody/Chords/Sound design Depending on what I come up with first, this almost defines my process. Most often this is sound design and least often a melody, however, as difficult as it is to start with a melody, these bring out the best results ...


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All these take practice. I usually start with whatever comes to mind, maybe a chord pattern, a melodic hook, or even a string of patterns. I like to start with lyrics but other people like to start with melodies.



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