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I agree with the plus-voted answers above, but I'd like to suggest a couple of additional techniques. First, simplify your chord voicings. Start with "shell" or "Bud Powell" chord voicings. Then add color notes: flatted fifths, 11ths, 13ths, etc. Honestly, this is what most jazz piano players do. George Shearing the Block Chord King is dead. Second, try ...


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I still think the best way to memorize chords is by their sound. To do this you would first need to be familiar with the pitch of every key on the keyboard and their relative pitches. This might seem really basic but is very important, and also fairly easy to accomplish on the keyboard because there are really just 12 keys repeating themselves. Then try to ...


0

I play the bass guitar, but I learned this way of practicing seventh chords and inversions from a saxophone player. Say I am working C Maj 7... I start at the bottom of my instrument and head towards the top of the range: up CEGBC, down ECBGE, up GECBG, down BGECB. Once I reach the top, I come back down again alternating up and down. I do this for each ...


2

The pianist will have the score with both parts showing. He/she will be able to nod you in. It won't look bad, as it'll be rather like 'I've done my part, now I'm handing back to you'. You could actually reciprocate, making it look like proper teamwork. Other than that, the existing answers seem to cover most other options.


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What I have found works is to do Harmonic Analysis of the score that you want to memorise. There is great parallels as to how actors learn long plays. When actors for example want to memorise a Shakespeare play they visualise each scene in there minds eye. The mind has great potential for memory when the visual approach is used. You can learn to visualise ...


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You just have to "know" the piece. All of it! If there's any doubt, use the music. Plenty of soloists do.


9

I both memorize the accompaniment and know my "cues" and count. Ideally one would have the whole piece in one's head and just know/feel when to come in, but with the typical amount of rehearsal time available, it's often wise to count to be certain. You can also use a hybrid system. If you know a cue (an easy to recognize moment played by someone else) and ...


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Hi the issue with the original question is that when forming the standard triad one uses the 1,3,5 fingers on the right hand and 5,3,1 on the left hand. However when forming sevenths one brings in the second finger on both hands. 1,2,3,4 on the right and 5,4,3,2 on the left. This gives the dominant seventh of F as C-1,E-2,G-3 and Bb-4 with the 5 of the right ...



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