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12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


7

You need to change your finger position on the pick so that your index finger or thumb is slightly over hanging the side of the pick. Strike the note with the pick and then brush with the flesh of your finger or thumb (depending on whether it's an up or down stroke). Notes / strings will get different harmonics at slightly different places. Use your pick ups ...


6

In general, your technique isn't going to be fundamentally different than if you are alternate picking, and general good picking technique will apply: Keep your right hand and arm relaxed Hold the pick loosely Move your hand in parallel with the strings (i.e. don't scoop) Monitor your pick strokes to ensure that there is no wasted motion Monitor the tone ...


5

Ok some insight I got from a high-end Mixing Engineer from one of the best recording studios in Germany: With distorted guitars: First get the sound right, then thing about eqs and stuff THEN: Be careful with the high pass: Some Guitars have needed power in the 70-90 hz area (punch, impact). It is often useful to boost this area to give the guitars more ...


5

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


5

For goodness' sake, get thee to a voice instructor! Rock/blues stars who appear to be screaming and shredding their vocal cords have taken many lessons in how to produce that sound structure without actually stressing their throat. (or their career is less than a couple years long :-( ).


5

I think you will be hard-pressed to find someone willing to endorse screaming as a viable means of sustainable vocal production. Screaming is hurtful to the vocal folds. The reason why your voice gives out is because your vocal folds are inflamed from the screaming and cannot continue to resonate properly enough to sustain vocal production. This is why ...


5

There are a few examples of screaming in Western classical music, but only as a coloristic effect; I am not aware of any compositions where it is used on a sustained basis the way it is in heavy metal. Some of these are when the music imitates styles such as blues or rock. Some examples: There are some primal screams in the first movement of Orff's ...


4

What you are hearing is two classical guitars (multi-tracked) playing something resembling Renaissance counterpoint, of the sort written in the years between, very roughly, 1400 and 1600. (Medieval would not be the correct term; medieval was an even earlier period in music history.) You can find many recordings of genuine Renaissance lute music. This is what ...


4

I think this is kind of a broad question, and when you say screams in rock music it's kind of a different definition to how it is used everywhere else. I think of everything from Deep Purple to Iron maiden, opeth and beyond in rock, but in everything else it can have multiple meanings. When I started searching it seemed that Bel Canto has some early ...


4

There are called Death Growls, Wikipedia mentions this uncited piece about technique: Growls can be obtained with various voice effects, but the effects are usually used to enhance rather than create, if they are used at all. Voice teachers teach different techniques, but long-term use will still take its toll - these techniques are designed to reduce ...


4

When you think "evil" and "bass guitar" the brand that immediately comes to mind is BC Rich: These guys practically invented the ultra-spiky death metal instrument look. If you want to look the part, get a BC Rich. If you don't go this route, look at some of the more out-there Ibanezes; their basses are usually the more conservative Gibson- or ...


4

Harmonics occur on the string at points that divide the string into equal parts. Lightly touch a string right above the 12th fret bar and while doing so strum the string -- you'll notice that the string sounds an octave higher, though different from just fretting the 12th. What you're doing is dampening the fundamental frequency and "odd" harmonics (3x, ...


4

A seven string guitar might have longer scale length to accommodate lower tunings. A six stringed guitar can usually be made to handle B tuning, but there might be intonation issues, especially with Gibson measure, which is 24.75". If one wants to go lower, a longer scale is preferred. That can be another benefit with a seven string guitar. Seven string ...


4

Where it's used is irrelevant. No genre demands a particular type of voice, a particular sound, etc. Well, opera demands some special usage of some muscles, but other than that you find all sorts of characters dipping into all kinds of genres. That being said, it is true that a lot of rock artists have higher tenor voices, but that doesn't mean bassier ...


3

First, let's make a distinction: When you say "bassy", are you talking about the tone of your voice, or the pitch range of your voice? Your pitch range, or voice type (bass, baritone, tenor) is not something you can change, but you can learn to expand your range. If by "bassy" you mean the tone you produce rather than the pitch range, then voice lessons ...


3

There are 'sweet spots' along the length of each string. When a string is played and is vibrating, a light tap on the sweet spot can cause a harmoinic sound. This happens because the tap slightly alters the way the string vibrates. A usual sweet spot is just above the first pickup. To hit a pinch harmonic, pick the note and almost immediately afterwards, ...


2

We may not be referring to the same genres of music... Most screamers, growlers, (talking most modern metal) etc whom I've met that do this for a set or more frequently are singing at a much lower level surprisingly than one would imagine. A loud system backing up your vocals plus some EQ, maybe a bit of smooth distortion on the mic and you've got a gnarly ...


2

Pretty easily; play the note on a downstroke, make sure you catch it well, on the way out (after sounding the note) catch the string slightly with the skin of your thumb, not too much or you will kill the note, note too little or the harmonic will not sound. Practice this; and you'll have it in no time; try playing a minor pentatonic all in pinched ...


2

I have my main gigging 7-string guitar tuned to A-D-A-D-G-B-E, which gives me the benefits of a normal Drop-D tuned 6 string, with a duplicated AD AD at the bottom end, which allows for some very full octave barre chords. Where this really comes into its own is three areas: Covering some of the bass range - when the bass is doing something else, I can ...


2

You have summed it up pretty well. Normally a 7 string guitar will have an extra low B string under the low E. This can be useful for rock and metal because you can add extra low metal tonalities to your power chords without having to tune your whole guitar lower. I'm primarily a jazz player and I have always wanted an extra high A string for better soloing ...


2

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


1

A harsh distorted sound is often caused by harmonics which are too dense. Applying a lowpass removes these harmonics making the sound softer, but this throws the baby out with the bath water, The distorion adds harmonics to the signal and the higher harmonics get very close to each other, forming non-musical intervals. You can mitigate this effect by ...


1

according to my personal experience: Be patient , it may take for years to reach your ideal speed . play every day ,seems exaggerating ! it's better to play half an hour a day but every day than to play 7 hours but 4 day per week. if you don't have practice schedule make one as soon as possible. warm up before start practicing, it strengthens your fingers ...


1

The part you are referring to is in D# natural minor. Although the natural minor scale (aka Aeolian mode) is commonly found in classical music, this particular piece still sounds pretty modern to me. For similar music, I would suggest that you listen to Blind Guardian. Their music is mostly Middle-Earth/Lord of the Ring fantasy-themed and very epic. Many ...


1

Pinch harmonics are harmonics, and harmonics come with less volume than the fundamental. You need some sort of compression or boost to offset that. If you aren't compressing or turning up or stomping a distortion pedal, you won't get the result you want. The rest of what everyone says (not a lot of pick sticking out from the thumb, knowing the right spots to ...


1

I've been a vocalist since my HS freshmen year which was 7 years ago, now in college and still with it. If you want to growl low, like really low, learn a false chord technique. If you want more of a scream or airy sounding growl learn vocal fry. False chord will still deepen your voice and if pushed to hard to often can cause development of the dreaded ...



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