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For me it was all about the tone. The over drive, distortion had more or less clarity depending on the amps used in conjunction with certain pedals. Each set-up is determined by the guitarist ear, what he/she prefers. I, coming from 90s metal in SD and LA would use a TS9 tubescreamer (the older models) to add a certain tone to the crunch as it were, shaping ...


0

While there is no 100% answer here, the common advice I see is to use an overdrive to compress and boost the signal so that the pre-amp stage of the amp can more effectively distort the signal. In this configuration you would dial the Drive setting of a TubeScreamer (for example) to near zero, Tone at whatever you want, and the Level to a very high setting. ...


6

Overdrive pedals like the tube screamer have a boost to the mid frequencies. When you turn up the output of the O/D pedal in the amp, the middle frequencies get more distorted, while the bass and highs are left more clean. This keeps the bass sound tight, which is essential for fast metal rhythms, and helps the guitars be heard over the low end of double ...


7

There are actually as many "metal" tones as there are metal guitarists. Some of the best metal guitarists in the world use no effects, but simply crank up their Marshall. Others will run a fuzz into a metal distortion then a high gain pre-amp stage, and boosted into distortion within the power amp stage. Still others will run parallel signal paths through ...


2

Distortion comes from the circuit 'clipping' the signal, changing the shape of the waveform and adding extra harmonic content to the signal. It's often preferred to go through multiple stages of gentler clipping, so that each stage 'rounds off' the signal a little more, as this allows the player to control the amount of distortion in a more graduated and ...


4

yossarian has mentioned why a bass might be tonally more appropriate than a guitar; I'll add that the string spacing (as well as the thicker, tauter strings) make certain percussive techniques easier on a bass. Remember too that the standard-tuned bass is seen by many bassists as not going low enough - 5-string basses starting at B0 are common, with ...


4

Normal bass is a full octave below a guitar. So if you're playing drop G on a 7 or 8 string, you're pretty close to the bottom of a standard 4 string bass. A 5 string bass will have a low B. So the simplest answer is that they're already there. However, that really only accounts for the pitch of the instrument. There are two other things to account for: ...


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The rule of thumb in singing is "your throat DOESN'T exist". The only organs you need to produce sound are your diaphragm for pushing the air from the bottom of your lungs and your hard palate to make the sound resonate. If you EVER use your throat, then whatever it is you're doing, you're doing it wrong. NOTHING should happen in the throat. As someone else ...


1

What works for me is to lightly keep my palm (the bit for palm-muting) just behind the bridge, and anchor the forearm to the guitar. That way, there's a whole hand movement available, which is a little stymied when the pinkie is resting on the guitar. Also, it's easier to move to other strings. Anchoring around a knob means too much stretching if one needs ...


2

Many guitarists, including myself, anchor a pinky onto the pick guard in order to retain accuracy when tremolo picking. Some of the top guitarists, however (I'm including Malmsteen, Vai and others) don't anchor at all, they hold their hand clear of the guitar and use both forearm and wrist, which allows them much faster pick speeds than an anchored hand.


3

There is no single correct way to do tremolo-picking. If you analyze how the greats do it you'll realize that everybody has their own technique. I'd suggest to watch videos of relevant players, and analyze their picking hand technique. From my personal experience as a teacher I know that lifting your palm but anchoring with one or two fingers (around where ...



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