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1

A harsh distorted sound is often caused by harmonics which are too dense. Applying a lowpass removes these harmonics making the sound softer, but this throws the baby out with the bath water, The distorion adds harmonics to the signal and the higher harmonics get very close to each other, forming non-musical intervals. You can mitigate this effect by ...


1

according to my personal experience: Be patient , it may take for years to reach your ideal speed . play every day ,seems exaggerating ! it's better to play half an hour a day but every day than to play 7 hours but 4 day per week. if you don't have practice schedule make one as soon as possible. warm up before start practicing, it strengthens your fingers ...


2

There's a point of paramount importance the answers so far haven't even mentioned: as with anything nonlinear (and metal-guitar distortion is the most nonlinear you get in audio production) it makes very much a difference whether you EQ before the distortion, or – with exactly the same settings – after the amp plugin. That's why you can't just simulate ...


3

First, let's make a distinction: When you say "bassy", are you talking about the tone of your voice, or the pitch range of your voice? Your pitch range, or voice type (bass, baritone, tenor) is not something you can change, but you can learn to expand your range. If by "bassy" you mean the tone you produce rather than the pitch range, then voice lessons ...


4

Where it's used is irrelevant. No genre demands a particular type of voice, a particular sound, etc. Well, opera demands some special usage of some muscles, but other than that you find all sorts of characters dipping into all kinds of genres. That being said, it is true that a lot of rock artists have higher tenor voices, but that doesn't mean bassier ...


5

Chromatic finger exercises with a metronome will help if your fingers are really weak. This is where you play 4 notes on each string from low (low e) to high (high e), and then back up again to low e. One finger on each fret, and when you have done all 6 strings, you start by moving one note up and do the exercise in the next position. (for example, you ...


12

Play it slow but correct and then speed up. Try to play it perfectly, as slow as you need it to be. It's better to be able to play it slowly and well then to play it fast and sloppy. Your friends are right, a metronome can help. First, set it to a speed at which you can comfortably play it. From there on, put it a bit faster each time. The song is at 120 ...


0

Practice the left hand more. It's as simple as that really. One of the big problems with piano is that you make some sort of breakthrough with the right hand and the left hand can't keep up. Then it's easy to get discouraged. But your left hand will make progress too. Just don't keep letting your right hand tell your left how deficient it is, if you ...


2

I have my main gigging 7-string guitar tuned to A-D-A-D-G-B-E, which gives me the benefits of a normal Drop-D tuned 6 string, with a duplicated AD AD at the bottom end, which allows for some very full octave barre chords. Where this really comes into its own is three areas: Covering some of the bass range - when the bass is doing something else, I can ...


4

A seven string guitar might have longer scale length to accommodate lower tunings. A six stringed guitar can usually be made to handle B tuning, but there might be intonation issues, especially with Gibson measure, which is 24.75". If one wants to go lower, a longer scale is preferred. That can be another benefit with a seven string guitar. Seven string ...


2

You have summed it up pretty well. Normally a 7 string guitar will have an extra low B string under the low E. This can be useful for rock and metal because you can add extra low metal tonalities to your power chords without having to tune your whole guitar lower. I'm primarily a jazz player and I have always wanted an extra high A string for better soloing ...



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