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I'll be honest. For glam rock, power metal, and quite a few others, tenors and high baritones rule. Certain types of music prefer baritones because the baritone range tends to be the most singable by the majority of the population. However, if you are an actual bass, you can probably take a few tenor songs down an octave, and it can sound quite awesome. ...


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like to hear where your at now with it. here is what my advise is find the cabinet type you like (1x10,2x10,4x10,1x12,2x12,4x12,ported open close etc.) and speaker size and tone that you like (each speaker breakup diff and tone is diff) next find the microphone you like (sm57 boosts lot of high makes it harsh and scooped, u87 is full bodied etc.) next find ...


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again, some simple rules and observations for working with modes in this case;(1) your song in "C minor" is already in a mode known as C-Aeolian (the natural minor 6th mode of the C-maj. scale)(2)Ionian and Aeolian are the exception to the rule and the only 2 modes of the C-Maj., scale that can have a tonal center/key- depending on how they are used (3)If ...


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Concerning the tabs and the second video example, note that Paul Gilbert spent his whole life perfecting his picking technique, so it shouldn't come as a surprise that playing his stuff is very challenging, especially for the picking hand. For that riff to sound good you definitely need to use alternate picking (as he does), not raking/sweeping. The latter ...


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I daresay the easiest way to get this kind of thing up to speed is to stick to consequent alternating picking. Of course it needs practise, but... that's sometimes inevitable when you want to go fast... Another approach that's in principle more economical would be raking technique (or do guitarists call this sweeping?) – you play two notes on adjacent ...



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