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13

As you say, "only" for emphasis - but emphasis is hugely important. People like music to have a pulse. A musician would play these two lines differently, and someone with a musical background would be able to tell the meter just by listening: There is a lot of subtlety to phrasing, but in blunt terms: They would play the first note of each bar slightly ...


7

I used to have the same problem as you do, so here's what really solved it for me. I used a funk guitar method: Funk Guitar: The Essential Guide. Start with a very comfortable tempo (~70/80bpm max), block the string, and play sixteenth notes (hence, 4 notes per beat). Tap every beat with your foot, and count the time out loud (that's very important). Do ...


6

Apart from the great answers talking about phrasing and emphasis, another purely technical consideration is synchronization. If you don't have bars, it's very difficult to get everyone in an ensemble to rehearse a specific passage or phrase together. You could add rehearsal letters to a free-time score, sure, but it's very easy to say "ok, let's try it ...


5

The problem with 6/4 is that it implies a metric grouping in the bass and drums of 3+3 or 6 on its own. I notice that you are defining your tempo as q.=160 when you do this, however. That part is actually correct, and you should make your metric decision based on how you hear the tempo. The 160 bpm that you are hearing are occurring four to the bar. You can ...


4

The tuner in Logic is designed for tuning instruments, so it takes a moving average. The properties you need for monitoring your singing - a fast response, and accuracy when you're quickly changing pitch, simply weren't design goals for that tool. For the same reasons, a typical tuner from a music shop, probably won't achieve what you want. A basic guitar ...


4

Hopefully these examples of 5/4:4/4 polymeter and 5:4 polyrhythm clears it up. Polymeter Here is a simple example of 5/4 over 4/4 polymeter notated in 4/4 time. Notice how voice A's meter is five beats (the accents illustrates the starts), while voice B's meter is four beats, and they are sort of modulating over each other. After 20 beats their accented ...


4

Most music naturally falls into rhythms. It's what makes music work in most cases. If one is trying to dance to it, it needs to be in rhythm.All the time signature (meter?) is there for is to tell the player/reader what to expect, without having to check out any further. 4/4 is so common, it's often stated with a 'C': when I write out music,in 4/4, I don't ...


4

Let's take a simple music sheet: As you can see, the time signature is given, and it's 4/4. That means every measure has 4 beats of quarters. I assume you know about the duration of the notes. Every measure/bar in the music sheet is defined by the vertical lines you can see in the image above. Between every two vertical lines, you must have notes whose ...


4

Let's forget about bar lines and look at some stuff where we're just marking stressed notes with accent marks. In everything that follows, the quarter note has the beat. "Amazing Grace" goes like this: Notice that a stressed note comes every third beat; the only exceptions are when there's a long note at the end of a phrase, and even then they're ...


3

The basic understanding of syncopation is when a note starts off-beat, and hanging over to the next off-beat. It is most common to say it is syncopated when it is a pattern that breaks with the basic beat, and not so much when it is just emphasize on the weak beat. It is often used as effect to create a rhythmic tension that leads forward to and resolves in ...


2

When you say, "if I'm given a song", I assume you do NOT mean that you have sheet music. Is someone humming? Are you hearing a song on the radio? You can usually find the measures and the time signature by listening carefully for the 1-beats. The 1-beats are the beginnings of musical phrases within the structure of a song. For example, if you're ...


2

Writing a piece in 3/8 rather than 3/4 gives the impression that it's played faster. It's snake-oil. With a proper tempo sign there should be no confusion. There are versions out there in 3/8. 3/4 and 6/4.The difference , as noted, is that the note values are shorter in 3/8,making it slightly more difficult to read, maybe, as semiquavers are on the menu.It ...


2

Amazing Grace is definitely not syncopated. Syncopation generally refers to rhythms emphasizing the beats that are expected to be the weak beats (for example 2 & 4 in 4/4). Or emphasizing notes off the beat entirely (for example emphasizing the + of each beat in 4/4 such as one AND two AND three AND four AND). There are many forms and types of ...


2

Polymeter : different voices/instruments that play different meters that desynchronize themselfs (a 9/8 piano part against a 4/4 drum part, or 7/8 on a 3/4 Polyrythms : different subdivisions that fit in the same bar. The classic Christmas tune "Carol of the bells" is an example of 2 against 3. Traditional cuban rumba, and lots of west African drum rhythms ...


2

In a way I envy you. I don't know whether it's due to my nature, training, or just the music I listen to, but I feel meters very strongly. As a result I find it really difficult to handle pieces which occasionally throw in a short bar. But, to train yourself to be more beat-centric: Practice with a drum machine. Choose patterns with an emphasised downbeat ...


2

On a technical level you are right; note that the MIDI format has no meter but simply states "this note so loud so long" (the last one indirectly by a follow-up note-off event). The note representation is still clumsy in total however and so needs additional information in the form of text ("funeral march"), articulations, accents and so on. To reduce the ...


1

Polyrhythms are multi-rhythms as in a bar of ,say, 8 quavers played against 12 quaver triplets (in the same bar).They don't necessarily fit properly,but they are playable.So, the bar length stays the same, but the divisions in it are varied simultaneously against another rhythm pattern in the same bar. ...


1

This is a problem that is experienced by most people starting to learn an instrument. Part of the problem is caused by not having the kind of technique where you don't have to think about the fingering patterns. Usually people who have a lot of problems with counting are trying to play pieces of music that are too hard for them. By this I mean that ...



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