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3

The "meters" in English-language hymn books describe the words, not the tune. They show not only the number of syllables per line, but also the rhyme scheme (that's what the dots in the meter signify). The rhyme scheme can be relevant for selecting alternative tunes to fit the words. Except for the most common meters (CM, SM, LM), the meter is not a ...


4

He's talking about "meter" as number of syllables per line. Hymnals frequently include a "Metrical index" of tunes. A lot will be listed as "Common Meter" or "CM", because so many hymns are 8.6.8.6. Think "There is a green hill far away". There's also "Short Meter", "Long Meter" and a few more. It's purely a syllable count with no thought to stressed ...


0

Meter, in the musical sense, is a property of music. If by "meter" you mean 4/4, 3/4, etc., then that can be independent of the text and would be part of the music to which the text is set. In a set of hymns, you'll probably only have a few different musical meters represented, so you may not get much value by listing the meters of the hymns in this index. ...


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Let's talk about the music before we talk about the metric breakdown. The piece is in cut time (2/2) and the first measure is a pickup and starts from the second beat. In cut time you would count this meter as 1 - 2 where beat 1 would be felt as a stronger beat. What this is showing in a very round about way is the note hierarchy and how it lines up with ...



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