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24

Make Sure it doesn't become a crutch: The most important thing about practicing with a metronome is to avoid becoming dependent on it. It is a tool that can be used to strengthen your rhythm and time when used properly, but if you overuse it, you might become uncomfortable playing without one because the machine is creating the pulse instead of you. As a ...


16

I'd definitely recommend a metronome, especially when the rythms are trickier. I basically use it for these types of exercises: the ones with difficult rythms, and the ones where the point is to build up velocity. The latter ones, I use a metronome to keep in check, because the main mistake in virtuosity exercises is to want to go too fast too soon and then ...


9

It must be loud enough, so you can hear it above your playing. I play really loud folk guitar, so I bought myself a really loud mechanical one. It must be exact. Usually metronomes do not have any problems with it - they are counting their time intervals very exactly. It is portable, if you are planning to take it with you somewhere to practice. And the ...


8

A sense of time varies from person to person. Some people have an acute sense of time and have less need for a metronome, while others may struggle with time. So the use of a metronome is relative to your personal sense of time. But even good time keepers will sometimes devote themselves to a steady regimen of metronome exercises in the spirit of improving ...


8

If you can't hear the click because it falls right underneath your strokes, that's called "burying the click", and it's generally a good thing. If your stroke is consistently just before the click, that's referred to as playing "ahead of the beat"; If your stroke is just after the click, it's called playing "behind the beat". Both are valid techniques to ...


8

My experience is strictly from playing the piano, but despite the difference in the specific motion required, the approach to building speed is the same. The short answer to your question is, "Don't do it". It's tempting to use the metronome to push yourself faster, but this strategy doesn't work largely for the same reason that this strategy doesn't work ...


8

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


7

Metronomes will help you keep a beat, but I find them booooring. Instead, I use Garageband and set up some different drum patterns. They're more interesting. Plus, you can set up other instruments if you want, and write simple songs. You can even do polyrhythms or complex time signatures by using two different time signatures together, or snippets from one ...


6

Yes, play scales, arpeggios, chords, all that good stuff. Play eighth notes, play triplets. Play slowly. I can't emphasize that last part enough. When you play fast, your timing "idiosyncrasies" are masked by the tempo and speed. But when you play slowly, all your timing issues show up like a zit on prom night. Set the metronome to 72 bpm and play ...


6

Some metronomes can show tempo names (Allegro etc.) as well as time frames. This might be useful if you have sheets that give only a named tempo, and not numeric time.


6

Saw Victor Wooten talk about metronome work, and his suggested method is to take a repeating riff, set the metronome for a time and play along, then drop the time in half so instead of having it be 1 2 3 4 it is just the 2 and 4. (Or 1 and 3.) Then drop it in half again so you just have the 1. Then shift it to "and-a" or something. The goal is to make you ...


6

You can use a metronome in different ways to study complex rhythmic figures. You can set the beat to correspond to a quarter note and work on subdividing the beats evenly. Or you can double the tempo so it corresponds to eighth notes and subdivide the sixteenths. Or you can double that so it corresponds to sixteenth notes, and work on counting beats for the ...


5

A metronome is the best tool for learning a new rhythm (besides a good piano teacher). I would highly recommend you use a metronome when learning complex rhythms. You should not, however, soley depend upon the metronome to do the work for you. I am not a piano teacher or expert, but these are my suggestions: First, try playing the piece slowly without the ...


5

Is the drum machine better or worse then a metronome in terms or every day practice? Definitely a drums are better to this; a metronome is just really a flat click there is no style to groove with; drums can provide this. Metronomes are really all about 'drilling' timing/speed into a musician. Using drums will let you develop timing in a more naturally ...


5

Practising to a metronome is a great way to strengthen your natural timing, forcing you to implicitly correct yourself and over time work those timing corrections into your natural playing, but if you're a beginner it may be a little too much right now. Before you learn to play well, you need to learn how to play in the first place so if you're struggling ...


4

Play at speeds that are slow enough where it's fairly easy to coordinate. If you can't find a meaningful tempo like that, don't use a metronome - your technique is not yet ready. Don't hesitate to go waaaaaay slow. Virtuosos commonly practiced at snail's pace. Rachmaninoff was famous for slowing his practice down to where the piece he was working became ...


4

Just like to add that if you have a Mac the drum machine 'Drumatix' is easy to use, sounds great, AND IS FREE. Download here. Hope this helps.


4

I managed to figure it out while asking the question. The reason is that 8 beats happens more and more quickly. At 100 bpm, 8 beats takes 4800 milliseconds, yet at 150bpm, it only takes 3200ms. I came up with a schedule of how to program a beat-only metronome so the increases are as close to 1 bpm every 4800ms as possible: At 100bpm, increase 1 bpm every 8 ...


4

It sounds as if you need to learn a little more theory -- a musical phrase can have a mixture of note lengths, and an unchanging tempo. A metronome provides you with a regular pulse. You are not necessarily expected to play a note on each tick, and often you'll also want to play notes in-between ticks. As a simple example, if you set the metronome to tick ...


4

A metronome can do several things. If a piece has a metronome marking, it can give you some idea of a composer's (or often an editor's) idea of how fast it should go. Also, it can give you an idea of whether your tempos through a piece are consistent. Especially when you are beginning to work on a piece, you can find that you are playing easier sections ...


3

I cannot speak specifically to percussion, but when I have worked with both wind players and pianists, when the student "loses" the metronome click, that is typically a bad thing. This is because they are so caught up in what they are playing that they are not concentrating on their time, and they are actually ignoring the metronome so much that they do not ...


3

I recommend you get a software drum machine, like FL Studio or Reason. FL Studio is excellent for getting started out with because its Cheap Easy to use Reason has a much wider array of instruments and drum kits available, but the refill packs etc can get $very $$expensive.


3

Another tip: If you can, use a human metronome. If you have a friend which can play with you, ask him to mark beats by playing or clapping. It is often more pleasant than the sound of most metronomes. And you can switch roles. Having the responsibility to give the tempo to someone teaches you a lot. Accept that it will not be perfect at the first attempt ...


3

Two additional points beyond BobRodes's answer For using the metronome as a gauge for progress with specific agility/speed exercises: e.g. taking a given exercise and increasing the metronome rate each day for a period of time. Focusing on listening to the click is a basic step towards being able to listen to other performers when in an ensemble situation. ...


2

Start slow, as slow as you need to actually play in time. Practice for a while at your limit then increase gradually. Then don't forget to have fun also. Practicing with metronome is great but frustrating. You must not kill your joy of playing. So play also without now and then :)


2

About using a metronome when studying a piece with tempo variations Using the metronome is especially useful when studying Beethoven, Chopin, Liszt or Scriabine. You should be able to play them in straight tempo, and the metronome can help you do that. When this is achieved, you can use it to train for a given acceleration or deceleration. It is often ...


2

I would say that metronome work is most useful at the "middle" stage of learning a piece. You will probably want to start learning a difficult piece without the metronome, not worrying about being out of rhythm too much. Once you know the notes, try working up slowly with the metronome. Some pieces (or parts of pieces), especially those of the Romantic ...


2

All the points of Silver Light are valid. For some extra features You can look for: What kind of divisions and metrums it supports (mechanical metronome must be equipped with bell for this feature) Also note that mechanical metronome is vulnerable. If it hits the ground :( it might loose it's accuracy Electronic ones sometimes comes with headphones output ...


2

It depends on what you want to achieve... If your focus is on improving your inner clock and your timing, I'd still recommend practicing with a metronome. The very short and boring clicking sound of a metronome has the great advantage that you can precisly tell whether you're on the click or not, at least if you're playing an instrument with a sharp attack, ...



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