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10

There are two (popular) types of microphones: dynamic microphones and electret/condensor mics. Dynamic microphones They work like a speaker in reverse. Sound moves a diaphragm/coil assembly. The coil moves over a magnet and a current gets induces. Hence we have voltage. Almost indestructible. YOu can literally pound nails with a Sure SM58 (fun abuse ...


5

Guitar-and-vocal studio and live micing has been studied heavily, yet while there are a lot of recommendations, perhaps the foremost among them is "experiment". Now, that advice is generally aimed at the professional recording engineer or home studio enthusiast, with a locker full of microphones to choose from. Someone looking to buy their first mike, like ...


3

I assume you mean the AC-60? This has a mic/line input with phantom power so should work direct with most dynamic or condensor microphones. If using a condensor mic, make sure it doesn't need more than 10mA current as this is the maximum it can provide according to the specs: http://www.roland.co.uk/products/productdetails.aspx?p=559&c=739 Other than ...


3

Great question. What all this really boils down to is the polar pattern or pickup pattern of the microphone. Some mics will pick up more sound from the front and less from the sides and rear. Mics that are extremely directional are good for rejecting the loud drums behind you and also rejecting the sound from a PA speaker that might be right in front of ...


2

I have found that positioning a mic about halfway of the fingerboard is the best tone compromise for "mic"ing a violin live. Although most often use a clip mic near the chin-rest pointing above the bow/string area to avoid having it in my line of sight if I look at my left hand. Halfway of the fingerboard is best tone quality. Near the bridge the sound has ...


2

It really depends on what type of quality you're looking for. I would highly suggest an audio interface with a good condenser mic, and possibly a pair of cardoid mics. The convenience of a USB mic is good, but audio interfaces are quite small and are not a hassle at all. It's better to record with the audio interface, because you can potentially record at a ...


1

Bluegrass players generally use a large diaphragm condenser mic (like a Neumann U87) on a boom stand pointed down. That way you can move in and out to control mix and dynamics, moving in on intros and breaks, and away when you "chunking" or filling. The condenser mic picks up a wide range, so you don't lose the warmth of the instrument as you often do with ...



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