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22

As others have noted, the properties of the signal from the microphone and from the piezo pickup will be different. The microphone picks up the same kind of air vibrations your ear does. The piezo pickup picks up the vibration of the saddle. The pickup has the advantage of being less susceptible to (but not immune to) feedback, and it moves with the guitar. ...


19

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


17

In these pictures it's likely that one mic is for the PA and the other mic is for recording. Either they didn't have mic splitters or they didn't trust them! This was a very common way of doing things in the 70s. The Grateful Dead are known to use two mics as a noise cancelling technique. The output of the two mics is combined with equal levels but ...


16

It's not a microphone; it's directional antenna for wireless microphone systems. See http://www.shure.com/americas/products/accessories/wireless-systems/wireless-systems-antennas for details.


12

There are two (popular) types of microphones: dynamic microphones and electret/condensor mics. Dynamic microphones They work like a speaker in reverse. Sound moves a diaphragm/coil assembly. The coil moves over a magnet and a current gets induces. Hence we have voltage. Almost indestructible. YOu can literally pound nails with a Sure SM58 (fun abuse ...


11

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


10

The sound from a microphone inside the guitar (or piezo pickups as in the case with Clapton) is different from the sound outside of the guitar. The signal from internal microphones or pickups will be more consistent, since it is not affected by movements of the guitar. Likely the signals are mixed to get the best of both worlds.


8

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


7

Guitar-and-vocal studio and live micing has been studied heavily, yet while there are a lot of recommendations, perhaps the foremost among them is "experiment". Now, that advice is generally aimed at the professional recording engineer or home studio enthusiast, with a locker full of microphones to choose from. Someone looking to buy their first mike, like ...


7

Adding to Meaningful Username's answer, the different sources (piezo pickup vs microphone) emphasise different parts of the guitar's sound. Not only is it used to help the sound be more consistent etc. but the different sounds themselves make for much more versatility when mixing. In general (this can vary wildly) a microphone will give a more "natural" ...


7

The short answer is no, and don't do that. :-) Your mixer contains a very important component, which is the mic preamp. The compressor wants to use line-level signal as input and output. Even if you injected phantom power between the compressor and the mic, then you're still trying to make the compressor work with mic-level signal. Nothing should come ...


6

3.5mm mic jacks might (sometimes supported by a jumper or different sound card setting) provide "plugin power". It can power electret condenser capsules with the typical single-FET preamplifier and works, for example, for the surprisingly good stereo clip microphones that were available for Minidisc players. Regular phantom power, however, is 40V to 48V ...


6

XLR is designed to carry a "balanced" signal. Pin 1 is ground, Pin 2 is "in phase" or "+" and Pin 3 is "out of phase" or "-". See for example http://www.clarkwire.com/pinoutxlrbalanced.htm The reason is the following: The microphone signals are very low so they are vulnerable to noise that gets injected into the cable especially if the run is long. Noise ...


5

High budget solution The only very effective way to amplify an accordion is with multiple microphones attached to the accordion itself. On this picture you can see three, but I've usually seen people using four microphones (two on each side): Remember that the sound of an accordion does not come from one central spot; each note comes from a different ...


5

Are the mikes on the amps feeding a PA which feeds the audience ears, or are the amps making the sound for the audience themselves ? If they're going through a PA one way is to turn the volume of the amps down a bit (so they don't saturate the room & bleed onto each other), face them away from each other or use acoustic shields to isolate them (or just ...


4

The sound from the microphone is undoubtedly the best, if you want the music to sound as close as you can to how it sounds unamplified. The mic captures all of the natural resonances of the guitar without the "quack" of a piezo pickup. However, controlling feedback with only a microphone is difficult. The musician will have to keep their guitar relatively ...


4

Line out would remove the influence of the speaker, an important component of the overall tone. Miking would preserve that, with the downside of potential spill from other sources. A third option would be something like a guitar Pod, many types available these days. That would be capable of giving you speaker emulation at the line outs. The guitarist could ...


4

My first questions would be 'why rifle mics?' & 'how far away are they?' As Doug said, an SM58 tight in front of one of the cones has been used with reasonable success for decades - play with axis to get the sound as you'd like it. It may not be the ultimate solution, but it really is a working solution. When you say they're under the staging, you ...


4

Distortion cannot be fixed after recording, you want to keep safely below it. Recording with too low volume will mean that the "noise floor" is amplified along with the useful data. Recording devices tend to have less than 16bit of usable data above the noise floor, so basically you have to juggle between an annoying level of noise and the risk of ...


4

sound different Yes. Mic preamps with transformers tend to color the sound more than their transformer-less counterparts. Mic preamps utilizing transformers tend to have: lower sensitivity higher distortion less precise low end reproduction These are not necessarily bad things BTW! Different circuits sound different, just as different microphones ...


4

Should I buy an audio interface to support my AT2020USB mic? Is it necessary to buy it... If you keep the existing microphone, than no. The primary purpose of an audio interface is to convert an analog signal into a digital one. Because your microphone is a USB mic (and USB cables carry a digital signal) there is already an analog-to-digital converter ...


4

Mics, like any other electronic device, can suffer component failure - but if we're talking other than hardware failures, broken condensers, ribbons etc, then the average lifespan of a mic can certainly be measured in decades. Currently in my mic case the youngest member, a well-gigged SM58 is a mere snip at about 15. The grandaddy in there is a U87 from ...


4

It looks like the missing piece in your case is an audio interface. That's a device that has audio inputs and outputs and also some kind of computer connection, like a USB, Firewire, or Thunderbolt interface. You should look at interfaces that have at least two analog inputs and two analog outputs. There are a couple ways you could set this up, depending on ...


3

In most live situations you would be using a dynamic microphone. The dynamic microphone equivalent of a pop filter is the the windscreen: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/RK183WS?device=c&network=g&matchtype=&gclid=CPWZ29-ZkL8CFa9r7AodES4Apg Most dynamic mics are built to take lots of abuse, so more nuanced considerations like pop filters ...


3

I have found that positioning a mic about halfway of the fingerboard is the best tone compromise for "mic"ing a violin live. Although most often use a clip mic near the chin-rest pointing above the bow/string area to avoid having it in my line of sight if I look at my left hand. Halfway of the fingerboard is best tone quality. Near the bridge the sound has ...



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