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1

A vocal microphone is actually 2 parts: microphone preamp You can think of the preamp like a 1-channel mixer. So if you are buying a brand new SM58 ($99) then also buy a small microphone preamp ($40) for it, like this one: ART Tube Mic Pre If that blows your budget, buy the mic preamp and then buy a $59 microphone instead of the SM58. That will give ...


1

For what you are doing, you probably want an external i/o with a mic preamp. You can get a reasonably priced one from an online vendor that has a single XLR input, phantom power, and an instrument line in. You will likely want a better microphone suitable for your application. At a basic level, a USB microphone would probably suit


2

From the comments you make it sound like you get unwanted noise picked up as well. Human spatial hearing in natural environments is rather good at sorting it out and ignoring it. That does not work when recording. My first attempts to record with high-quality low-noise equipment led to some frustrations. Listening to the monitored signal, I got puzzled ...


1

If what you need is a microphone, and the internal microphone is not giving you the results you want, you should just get a USB microphone.


0

If you want to connect a Shure dynamic mic (does not need phantom power) such as an SM58, SM57, Beta 58, PG58 etc. All you really need to make it work is the correct cable to plug into your 1/4 inch jack and mic. The cable you need has an XLR female plug on one end and a 1/4 inch TS plug on the other end. See picture below. Comes in various lengths. ...


0

"Shure" alone does not tell a lot. If it needs phantom power (like condenser mics do), it won't work on your amp. Also you have to realize that a guitar amp is not general-purpose but intended to make a guitar sound good. In the line of instrument amps, keyboard amps are likely the best candidates for misappropriation by singers as they are more catered ...


0

I once did that in a rehearsal session with a band I applied for. It was even an old bass amp. It did work and didn't seem to damage the amp, but don't expect anything that's close to a good sound. Speakers of Guitar or Bass amps are not build for such sounds, so it propably will be dull and bassy. Such an adapter for the cable you can get everywhere. My ...


0

The Canon or XLR plug that's probably on the Shure mic tells it's a low impedance mic. If it has a jack plug, it'll be high impedance, and will work better with your guitar amp. You can buy adaptors which plug between mic lead and guitar amp that will match up the differing impedances, matching mic and amp. So, you need a matching impedance adaptor, female ...


1

I think the most elegant way to amplify an accordion is by installing an internal microphone system. I work at the Acoustas Co. so I am partial to the system we make however we have tested all available systems internal and external and the AMx11HD and AMx7HD is the most sound solution to amplify an accordion.


0

Some USB interfaces that do provide phantom power (like this) cost not much more than your phantom power source. I think the overall quality may be better than using just a phantom power source and the built-in audio interface of your computer. If it is not a computer where you want to plug in your mic, check if it does not provide phantom power on its own. ...


0

These two things traditionally don't achieve the same goals; but most audio interfaces allow you to use phantom power (usually with a wall-wart adapter). One is for powering a microphone (for use live, radio, anytime a microphone is needed, etc.) and the other is for recording input from a microphone. If you get a USB audio interface you'll kill a few ...


0

You are pretty certain to outgrow a 1 channel power supply since most stuff you want to plug a condenser mic into with convincing results can power it anyway. So it's more of a stopgap device. Of course, with a USB (or other) interface you also put down a wad of money for a particular quality you are then tied into. My own approach would be to get a good ...


16

It's not a microphone; it's directional antenna for wireless microphone systems. See http://www.shure.com/americas/products/accessories/wireless-systems/wireless-systems-antennas for details.


7

The short answer is no, and don't do that. :-) Your mixer contains a very important component, which is the mic preamp. The compressor wants to use line-level signal as input and output. Even if you injected phantom power between the compressor and the mic, then you're still trying to make the compressor work with mic-level signal. Nothing should come ...


3

Amplification is nice for singing because you can add a little reverb (a mild echo quality that makes you sound like you're a professional, singing in a hall). It's really cool; and the day I got a mic and a small amp with reverb was the day I stopped sounding like someone singing in his bedroom, and started sounding like a singer. Having noted that, I ...



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