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2

Acoustic shielding is difficult. The effectiveness of any shield is a function of the ratio of it's size to the wavelength. That means that shields are good at controlling high frequencies (= small wavelengths) but do almost nothing at low frequencies. Wavelength at 100 Hz is 3.40m. So a shield can eliminate high frequency pick up but you still end up with ...


4

My first questions would be 'why rifle mics?' & 'how far away are they?' As Doug said, an SM58 tight in front of one of the cones has been used with reasonable success for decades - play with axis to get the sound as you'd like it. It may not be the ultimate solution, but it really is a working solution. When you say they're under the staging, you ...


5

Are the mikes on the amps feeding a PA which feeds the audience ears, or are the amps making the sound for the audience themselves ? If they're going through a PA one way is to turn the volume of the amps down a bit (so they don't saturate the room & bleed onto each other), face them away from each other or use acoustic shields to isolate them (or just ...


6

The biggest advantage for line out is that you don't have to worry about feedback, and that you can model the tone without worrying about positioning, angles, mics, bleeding, etc; which is a disadvantage of the mic-amp combo, you need to worry about a lot of things to be able to do it correctly. If you love the sound that comes out of the speakers of the ...


4

Line out would remove the influence of the speaker, an important component of the overall tone. Miking would preserve that, with the downside of potential spill from other sources. A third option would be something like a guitar Pod, many types available these days. That would be capable of giving you speaker emulation at the line outs. The guitarist could ...


2

Why not do both? Use a DI unit such as a Radial JDV or similar and run one output into your amp which is mic'd and the other into your audio interface and record the direct dry signal at the same time, then simply add an amp sim plugin and choose a tone to complement your amp tone.


7

The answer is: It depends. A good amp connected to a good cab in a good room will sound good through a well placed good mic connected to a good preamp. I don't believe that any amp sim can beat that yet. But that's a lot of variables, many things can go wrong, it's not very hard but certainly not trivial. To me, a good amp simulator sounds way better than ...


7

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


22

As others have noted, the properties of the signal from the microphone and from the piezo pickup will be different. The microphone picks up the same kind of air vibrations your ear does. The piezo pickup picks up the vibration of the saddle. The pickup has the advantage of being less susceptible to (but not immune to) feedback, and it moves with the guitar. ...


4

The sound from the microphone is undoubtedly the best, if you want the music to sound as close as you can to how it sounds unamplified. The mic captures all of the natural resonances of the guitar without the "quack" of a piezo pickup. However, controlling feedback with only a microphone is difficult. The musician will have to keep their guitar relatively ...


7

Adding to Meaningful Username's answer, the different sources (piezo pickup vs microphone) emphasise different parts of the guitar's sound. Not only is it used to help the sound be more consistent etc. but the different sounds themselves make for much more versatility when mixing. In general (this can vary wildly) a microphone will give a more "natural" ...


10

The sound from a microphone inside the guitar (or piezo pickups as in the case with Clapton) is different from the sound outside of the guitar. The signal from internal microphones or pickups will be more consistent, since it is not affected by movements of the guitar. Likely the signals are mixed to get the best of both worlds.


1

You are probably best off with several small condenser mics mounted on the accordion itself. That setup is pretty impervious to movements. For studio recordings, one might consider big membrane condensor mics in a distance making the movement of the accordion less of an issue. However, my experience is that this setup works bad for tremolo registrations ...


4

High budget solution The only very effective way to amplify an accordion is with multiple microphones attached to the accordion itself. On this picture you can see three, but I've usually seen people using four microphones (two on each side): Remember that the sound of an accordion does not come from one central spot; each note comes from a different ...


2

Any dynamic mic should work. I have seen accordionists use Sm57s in the past. The instrument is quite loud, and occupies a wide swath of the spectrum. Some folks opt for two microphones - one on each side of the accordian. Some companies sell clip on mics for accordians, but I imagine these are more for convenient movement than for good sound. Some accordian ...


5

Since it's not your band, and you're alerady kind enough to provide a PA system, don't do anything. Let the accordionist make do with what you have (e.g. mic stand and SM-57) or else bring his or her own equipment (such as clip-on mics and a pre-amp) to plug into your PA. Musicians have to be responsible for this kind of thing themselves, if they want the ...


4

The problem with accordions (as with some other instruments) is that the sound comes from multiple places and at least part of the sound source is always in motion. That makes getting consistent results from fixed mics difficult. Mics strapped to the instrument, as in @LeeWhite's answer, are indeed the best solution, akin to other instrument pickups. If ...


11

Since there's a lot of bickering about it, I'll give you the three best solutions. ("Best", as in, this seems to be the sentiment of everybody who has posted so far.) High budget solution The only very effective way to amplify an accordion is with multiple microphones attached to the accordion itself. On this picture you can see three, but I've usually ...


3

Typically you use two mics for accordion. The right hand end of the instrument is the treble end and stays still (is strapped to the performer) and the left hand end is the bass end and moves about more as the bellows open and shut. The right hand mic therefore can be placed quite close to the instrument and the left hand one needs a bit more space. If the ...


1

SM57s are industry standard for instrument amplification. On a stand will be good, but it could depend on how animated the player becomes ! Put beside the holes where the sound emanates is best. If the guy wants to be more mobile, you could gaffa tape the mic to the accordion, but that may not go down too well with the owner. The best way of course is to use ...


18

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


13

In these pictures it's likely that one mic is for the PA and the other mic is for recording. Either they didn't have mic splitters or they didn't trust them! This was a very common way of doing things in the 70s. The Grateful Dead are known to use two mics as a noise cancelling technique. The output of the two mics is combined with equal levels but ...


-1

I hadn't really noticed this but I'm guessing it was probably used to create a stereo effect to make the vocals a bit richer. I don't think it is really necessary anyway which might explain why it was abandoned. It's also hard for the singer to move away from the mic stand.



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