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1

Signal/ground/shield are the three leads to a mono microphone. Or +/-/sheild. On other occasion there will be phantom power to the microphone to turn it on or to provide voltage to active electronics. Etc... Etc... The fact is that your microphone being mono is not the reason why it has three leads it can operate with two. There are three leads because the ...


6

XLR is designed to carry a "balanced" signal. Pin 1 is ground, Pin 2 is "in phase" or "+" and Pin 3 is "out of phase" or "-". See for example http://www.clarkwire.com/pinoutxlrbalanced.htm The reason is the following: The microphone signals are very low so they are vulnerable to noise that gets injected into the cable especially if the run is long. Noise ...


2

I expect that you would be best with renting a PA system that come with mikes and a skilled operator, then seeing what works well for you. The first question is do you put mikes on a stand pointing at each handle bar This may lets a single mike pick up all the bells on the bike depending how far the mike is from the bike. You have to setup the stands You ...


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They do actually use bicycle bells in modern compositions for orchestra. And there it is not necessary to amplify the bell at all. Like a triangle because of its frequency range will always be heard. Even 'Glockenspiel' and 'Celesta' are used to double up strings (that are already arranged in octaves for enforcement) and give them the certain 'ping' on the ...


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Well, take a solid sampling of your bells to a music store and try out mics. Make sure to playback through good equipment both on earphone and loudspeaker. I could imagine ribbon mics to work nicely for that because of good impulse response and an organic tapering off at "noise" frequencies. I've made disappointing experiences with picking off a nice ...


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There's several possibilities if you're getting random static that correlates to source sound amplitude. First, there's a defective capacitor in the electronics that's leaking. You can't fix that for less than the price of that microphone. Second, you've spit on the capsule (or otherwise soiled it) and it's shorting. You also can't fix that for less than ...


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Virtually any microphone generally sold for live stage use will suffice. You're not, after all, capturing the sound of a "Stradivarius" here. Any mic you'd use to capture a trash can lid being struck will also be good for bicycle bells. Not meaning to be snarky here. You've got an intentionally low-fidelity audio source, and using $2000 microphones on ...


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A microphone that requires phantom power will not work without it. Phantom power is a method to feed 48v to the microphone through the 3-connector XLR plug. You'll need to plug that mic into a preamp or mixer input that provides phantom, or alternatively various companies make a DI box that provides phantom power.


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3.5mm mic jacks might (sometimes supported by a jumper or different sound card setting) provide "plugin power". It can power electret condenser capsules with the typical single-FET preamplifier and works, for example, for the surprisingly good stereo clip microphones that were available for Minidisc players. Regular phantom power, however, is 40V to 48V ...


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Not all condenser mics need phantom power. Not all amps/mixers provide it. If the mic in question needs it, and the amp doesn't provide it, then it won't work. Usually phantom power is provided through the XLR (Cannon) plug/socket. By using an XLR-jack adapter, the power may well be lost through the connection.



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