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36

'Dorian mode on C' does not mean "the Dorian scale that you can find among the notes that are available in the major key of C"! 'Dorian mode on C' refers to the Dorian scale, or set of note intervals, that start on the note C, i.e. C is its root or tonic. This set of notes happens to be the same as the ones found in the Bb major key, thus two flats. This is ...


18

A scale is any sequence of ascending (or descending) notes that can be used as an "organizing structure" for a piece of music. There are many types of scales, including diatonic (the "standard" in Western music), chromatic (containing every half note in an octave), whole-tone (containing notes a whole step apart), and pentatonic (the pentatonic formed from C ...


18

G Mixolydian is a modal scale, more specifically the 5th mode of the major (Ionian) scale. We can't very well call it a "C" scale because (a) G is the tonic, not C and (b) assuming you meant C (Major), it does not have the same interval pattern as a major scale due to the lowered 7th. As far as its purpose, it can serve many. After all, it's an ordered set ...


18

The minor scale is not called the "minor scale" because it is the most minor. Names don't have to accurately reflect the definition. Modes are sometimes classified as "minor" or "major" depending on their third (a minor third usually comes with other minor degrees like the flat 7th which is common to all minor modes of the major scale). And of all the minor ...


17

A "scale", technically defined, is a sequence of ascending or descending "unit pitches" that form a palette of notes that can be used to form a melody. Most scales in Western music conform to a particular "key"; that is, a sequence of notes that will be "sharp" or "flat" by default. Not all scales have keys; the chromatic scale is a scale of all possible ...


15

It partly depends how you read the accidentals at the beginning of each staff, and there are several manuscripts of this treaty and therefore of this Sobria. If one uses the PnD manuscript (from Paris National Library - Ex French Royal Library - Fonds Italien) as you do (I do not have access to something else anyway), and one makes the hypothesis that the ...


14

There seems to be a general confusion here. Everything you can play or imagine is possible. Theory is a means to describe music, but music is by no way bound to any theory whatsoever. Major scales are typically not a good way to describe (or play) Blues. Better suited are scales that are aptly named "blues scales" (see ...


14

It's important to understand that mode doesn't have to be, and often isn't, an explicit choice. You wrote: The notes we play and the order is based on sound and emotion. and that's true enough, but—if you've mostly written notes from a single western key and are writing in a more or less traditional style—then the way you've used those notes will be in ...


12

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


11

When you play a C Major scale and have emphasis on a note other than C, such as D, then it is D Dorian. The player implies that the D note is the root using the notes of the C Major scale. Another thing is the harmony behind the scale. What chords are being used? That would direct your ear in hearing where the root is. If I play Dmin7 chord and use the C ...


11

Sure, that kind of modal shifting using the same root relationships is generally quite effective. In your particular example, you might want to raise the 7th scale degree (C to C#) for V and vii chords (much as you might do in minor) in order to get a stronger drive to the i chord, but then you wouldn't strictly be in D Dorian. Either way works but has a ...


10

What you are asking about doesn't really have to do with modes or accidentals. Essentially what you are talking about is the difference between modern equal temperament on the one hand, and just intonation on the other. Up until the late 1800s, musical instruments could play the traditional Greek modes and scales based on pure intervals, but a given ...


10

I am really not knowledgable in ancient music theory so the following might be riddled with errors, but here is what I've gathered. What are the original Greek modes? Ancient Greek music scale theory was built upon the concept of the "tetrachord" - literally meaning four strings. A tetrachord consists of a group of four notes with three smaller intervals ...


10

Two modes are parallel if they share the same tonic. That is, D Major, D Minor, D Dorian, and D Mixolydian are all parallel modes. Using a parallel mode will cause a chromatic alteration to your usual key signature. For example, Dorian uses #6 and Phrygian uses b2 (when compared to a minor key or Aeolian mode), while Mixolydian uses b7 and Lydian uses #4 ...


9

Sorry, but I have to chime in after all this time. The answers given here, while accurate, convey none of the most critical distinctions, nor of how modes sound to the ear in a way different from scales. And how things sound is what music is all about. Otherwise you may as well describe the difference between, say, Leonardo Da Vinci and Claude Monet by ...


9

I hope no one minds that I got curious, and did a bit of digging into this on my own. I discovered what appears to be an excellent resource answering this very question. The book is entitled Between Modes and Keys: German Theory, 1592-1802 by Joel Lester (1989). I do not have access to a copy of the book, but I've been able to see several relevant portions ...


9

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


9

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


8

I'll give this a shot. Some elements contributing to a Medieval sound are Minor-key, modal melody (I think it is Dorian) Melody is catchy and song-like and follows a resolution pattern that resembles old drinking songs or sailor songs. The 6/8 rhythm also contributes to a drinking-song feel. Harmonic voice-leading features prominent parallel motion ...


8

The basic idea on how to establish a mode is make the tonal center of the progression and melody center the tonic of the modal scale and use harmony that signifies the mode you are in. For example this progression would signify C major. C - F - G - C The progression stats and ends with C and the melody to accompany this would use the notes of the C ...


7

Yes, they're using all the same notes, but not necessarily in the right order... C maj. will be CENTRED around C, D Dorian will be CENTRED around D, E Phrygian will be... you get the picture. The home (CENTRED) note will be the mode letter. The chords may well be the same, but their function will be different, i.e. in C maj., the G will be the dominant ...


7

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


6

While the terms can be used fairly interchangeably, that only speaks to the practical applications; where each comes from is slightly different. A scale is an ordered sequence of notes with a start and end. A mode is a permutation upon a scale that is repeatable at the octave, such that the start and end points are shifted. For example, the major scale is ...


6

I think the musical answers already given are the most useful, but the dictionary answers may also be informative. From the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) we get: Scale: Any of the graduated series of sounds into which the octave is divided, the sounds varying according to the system of graduation adopted. Mode: A scheme or system specifying the ...


6

Mode mixture is a pretty common thing to see in rock music. Basically, that just means it's okay if you see chords that are outside of the key here and there--and the major chord built on the flat 7th (bVII) in particular is something you'll see a lot. For this song, I would say your analysis of D mixolydian is completely accurate. The root is undoubtedly ...


6

Basically, modes come from a major scale, also known as the Ionian mode. This is your TTSTTTS spacing, note by note, as in Cmaj: CDEFGABC.Starting on the 2nd note, and rising to an octave above it, you get the Dorian mode.The next starts on the 3rd note, E in this scenario.It's the Phrygian mode. The 4th degree start gives the Lydian, the 5th ...


6

Modes and scales are just a way of ordering a series of notes. A bit like there's an order for letters - alphabet - but those letters never get used in that order (apart from the word 'no'...). A song in a particular mode will be based around a particular note. As in, that note feels like home, often a start place, and usually a finish place in a journey. ...


6

Of course there are infinite ways one might explore a scale or harmony compositionally, but one aspect of the pitch collection that made it interesting to Scriabin is that it can be used to resolve in a more-or-less traditional manner to a number of different distantly related harmonic areas. First off, a reminder about the harmonic possibilities of a ...



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