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12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


3

will it switch like this (C Ionian -> C Mixolydian) or like this (C Ionian -> G Mixolydian)? Both; depends on what you want to do and where you want to go from the mode you are on. Let's look closely at these two examples. We are in C Ionian mode (C major); if you go to C Mixolydian, you'll find yourself in the V mode of the F Ionian mode. We are in C ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...


2

This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


2

Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...


1

In regards to any person, be it author or any other, pertaining to the exact history or meaning behind the modes is technically and historically impossible. This is due to the fact the original modes developed by the ancient Greeks goes as far back as 300 or 400 B.C.!!! or the Hellenistic period. Greece was then subsequently through the proceeding ages ...


1

Key signature and note collection notwithstanding, a musical composition that is written in F Lydian is NOT a mode of the key of C major - even though the key signature would be the same as for C major and all of the notes in F Lydian are also in C major. In fact, the so called “key signature” does not always tell you what key a musical work is written ...


1

F lydian has the same key signature as C major (in other words it has the same notes, the same number of sharps and flats, in this case zero.) It also has the same key signature as A minor. However all three are different keys, because they have different tonal centres. A key is named after the note it tends to gravitate to. A passage in A minor clearly ...



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