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4

I think in our current times we would say that they are the same. See other answers. Really the answer is "yes, but no". We need to think historically. Where does the Ionaian mode come from? Early music? Gregorian chant? "Modal" music? The Ionian mode is an outgrowth of the Lydian mode for voice leading purposes. In F-Lydian there is a B-natural and in F-...


4

The other answers here are basically correct: the scale notes of major and Ionian modes are the same, but major is more modern, and tends to use the I-V-I cadence pattern, while Ionian has other cadences possible- for instance, I-ii-I, as in Sumer is icumen in: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/.a/6a00d8341c464853ef017615c0b763970c-pi Trying to draw a ...


3

The diffrence is simple. When you are talking about the major scale you are talking in a tonal context and when you are talking about Ionian you are talking in a modal context. You won't hear anybody use Ionian to describe a collection of pitches unless it is being used in a modal context. I'm not going to explain all the differences as this answer, but I'll ...


3

Take a II, V, I progression in the key of C. Here's two ways to approach it. Over the II chord, play dorian, over the V play mixolydian, over the I play Ionian. I personally don't like thinking this way. I prefer the second way, to think "key of C" and listen to the unique sound of each chord and define those chordal notes. This may be what these ...


2

Jimmy Bruno is an extremely competent and technical guitar player who would definitely know all about modes from a performance viewpoint. If you could provide the quote I could give you a better answer but here's what I think he's talking about. Players like Carol Kaye and Joe Pass form solos from chord notes with connecting notes. There are a couple of ...


2

There is no difference. The term "Ionian" was invented in 1547 by a Swiss musicologist (Heinrich Glareanus) who decided for some reason that there should be 12 modes, rather than the traditional 8. The four that he added were two versions of the major scale and two versions of the melodic minor, which previously had never been called "modes" by the ...


1

In such a functional progression it is not helpful to look at each chord in isolation, so you can't just say "I play mixolydian over each dominant seventh chord". The B7 chord is clearly the dominant in the key of E minor. The B mixolydian scale would be a reasonable choice if it resolved to E major. However, in E minor, the standard choice over B7 would be ...


1

The C major and C Ionian scales are the same scale, we have just taken to calling Ionian major. It's the same way that the c natural minor scale is the same as the C aeolian scale, we just call it by a different name. There is no difference in the scales.



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