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Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


4

In his comment, Patrx2 listed the 8 traditional church modes: Dorian (and Hypodorian), Phrygian (and Hypophrygian), Lydian (and Hypolydian), and Mixolydian (and Hypomixolydian). The "Hypo-" forms are called plagal modes (as opposed to the four authentic modes). The plagal modes have the same "final" (tonic) and the same pitch classes as their corresponding ...


3

you can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


2

This scale is often called double harmonic scale. In my experience (i.e., in popular music) that's the standard name for that scale. Arguably the most famous use of that scale in popular music is Dick Dale's Misirlou. And, by the way, the double harmonic scale and the Hungarian minor scale are modes of each other.


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The scale is known as the flamenco mode or Major-Phrygian and as far as I am concerned is the most popular variant of that set of notes. Off the top of my head I don't know any songs that contain this scale, but it is used all the time in flamenco music along with Phrygian dominant. Melody wise, you would probably want to take advantage of how symmetric ...


2

Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...


1

I'm a composition student at UCLA who is in the process of writing his dissertation, which on one level, has a lot to do with modes - so it's on my mind a lot these days (which led me to this site). Here are my thoughts: Robert Fink's answer (above) is an excellent answer. This is the type of answer you would get from someone who has studied music for a ...



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