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The scale that fits over all the chords given is: A B C# D E F# G A Those notes are in the D Major Scale but the intended root is A as repeated at beginning and end of chord progression in other areas of song and starts the song. Therefore it is A Mixolydian.


3

The song definitely has the more an A Mixolydian feel then a D major feel. Both contain similar chord progressions, but there are a few signs showing A Mixolydian is the better way to look at it. First of all, the progression itself centers around A as the tonic. Also note that the dominant chord (E major) is not present in this progression which would very ...


2

If I understand your wording in the question, there's confusion over terminology. D Dorian is the Dorian mode centered around and rooted on D. It contains all of the notes from its parent scale of C major. The Dorian of C is another, less common, way of naming it. Subtle difference in name, but using different notes! D Dorian - D E F G A B C, Dorian OF D - ...


1

It's very common to use chords 'borrowed' from the parallel. As in A maj - with A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m and ...Am, C, Dm, E (Em), F, G. Yes I left out the 'dim'. Doing this in a song doesn't put it into a mode, but it still retains its original letter name as its key. There is no mention about a G# NOTE in the song, at a different place. If that exists, then ...


1

All the notes involved are present in A mixolydian, which is the 5th mode of D major = D ionian. The two scales are relative to each other: they share the same notes. If it was a modal progression, staying in A7 for most of the time, you could say it was in A mixolydian. But that's not the case. There is a G# in A major, not a G, so that's wrong too. It ...



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