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14

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


11

You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.


7

As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


7

The harmonic minor, and melodic minor scales are not modes of the natural minor scale. A mode is a very specific idea in music where you would start building a scale on another note of the scale. For example, A minor consists of the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A and it's built using the scale pattern W-H-W-W-H-W-W. You also may notice that C major consists ...


6

It's actually can be looked at modally as a chords from the Phrygian/Phrygian Dominant scales. The Phrygian scale due to its lowered third is viewed as a minor scale and thus contributes to the "sadness" you hear especially since the A would be the 3rd of the Phygian scale giving the progression a slightly more minor sound even using just major chords. ...


6

First off, the A Phrygian Dominant scale consists of the notes: A - Bb - C# - D - E - F - G You got the first part of the name right as the Phrygian part of the name does come from where Phrygian is typically derived. The dominant comes from the fact that you can build a dominant 7th chord off the tonic as A, C#, E, G spell A7. There are other scales ...


5

Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


4

Yes, the concepts are simple. Each mode keeps the tonality of the diatonic parent scale but starts / ends on different notes. For example: Parent Scale / Ionian - C D E F G A B C Dorian - D E F G A B C D Phrygian - E F G A B C D E etc through all of the other scale degrees. When people discuss "playing in the right mode", they are talking about using ...


4

I believe the sad impression is most of all due to the chromatic descent B - A♯ - A embedded in these chords. It has a kind of disillusioning effect: you start out on a nice major third of the G chord. But then you drop down to F♯, whose A♯ third is enharmonic equivalent to the G chord's minor third. Normally this wouldn't be perceived as ...


4

There's a much more simplified explanation of the chord progression. Let's start off by looking at the notes of each chord: D (D F# A) F# (F# A# C#) So if you want to just move between the two chords over and over again you would most likely see the notes move in this fashion: D -> C# -> D F# -> F# -> F# A -> A# -> A Notice how ...


4

The other answers here are basically correct: the scale notes of major and Ionian modes are the same, but major is more modern, and tends to use the I-V-I cadence pattern, while Ionian has other cadences possible- for instance, I-ii-I, as in Sumer is icumen in: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/.a/6a00d8341c464853ef017615c0b763970c-pi Trying to draw a ...


4

I think in our current times we would say that they are the same. See other answers. Really the answer is "yes, but no". We need to think historically. Where does the Ionaian mode come from? Early music? Gregorian chant? "Modal" music? The Ionian mode is an outgrowth of the Lydian mode for voice leading purposes. In F-Lydian there is a B-natural and in F-...


3

Aeolian with a diminished first, while that is possible in a theoretical sense, isn't likely to appear in actual music. What I hear when listening to the first bars of the track is an emphasis on the minor third gap between the sixth and seventh degree of the harmonic minor scale (I don't have a keyboard in front of me to confirm the actual notes, but see ...


3

Yes this scale actually exits and it's a mode of A Neapolitan Minor which contains the notes: A Bb C D E F G# A This scale starting on C in particular would be called Mixolydian Augmented due to it resembling the Mixolydian scale, but one where you would create an augmented chord off the tonic chord. C D E F G# A Bb C You can also think ...


3

The reason why a Bb is used instead of a B has to do with the key aspects of the Lydian mode itself which is the #4 and how it acts. The only difference between the Ionian mode and the Lydian is the 4th which is perfect in the Ionian mode and augmented in the Lydian mode. In Fux's counterpoint whatever mode you were in, you would want your cantus firmus and ...


3

will it switch like this (C Ionian -> C Mixolydian) or like this (C Ionian -> G Mixolydian)? Both; depends on what you want to do and where you want to go from the mode you are on. Let's look closely at these two examples. We are in C Ionian mode (C major); if you go to C Mixolydian, you'll find yourself in the V mode of the F Ionian mode. We are in C ...


3

This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


3

It really depends on if you want to think more tonal while using modes or modal while using modes. Modal progressions themselves don't fall in line with the typical tonal progressions for example V-I in Ionian is tonal not modal. However, we are used to hearing music progressions that are tonal in nature so the typical V-I, IV-I, V-i, iv-i, or v-i ...


3

Take a II, V, I progression in the key of C. Here's two ways to approach it. Over the II chord, play dorian, over the V play mixolydian, over the I play Ionian. I personally don't like thinking this way. I prefer the second way, to think "key of C" and listen to the unique sound of each chord and define those chordal notes. This may be what these ...


3

The diffrence is simple. When you are talking about the major scale you are talking in a tonal context and when you are talking about Ionian you are talking in a modal context. You won't hear anybody use Ionian to describe a collection of pitches unless it is being used in a modal context. I'm not going to explain all the differences as this answer, but I'll ...


2

Modes are just a very old type of scale. It was just the way in which the pre baroque era Medieval music was made. It is in essence the musical system that predates the current classical inspired system. If you want to go in depth about how you can see the different modes for what they are you can always just look where the semi tones in the scale / piece ...


2

The reason a mode sounds different is simple: which note is targeted as the base. which means which note is emphasized more than others. really it's a combination of the base note and the fifth above it. emphasizing these two notes more than the others give a different sort of tonality than a home base of "C and G".


2

The cycle of fifths and the Phrygian mode are more or less orthogonal concepts. They're not mutually exclusive, but neither will do a good job supporting the other without support from other elements of the music. The Phrygian mode requires careful attention to establish the mode and its final (modal equivalent to a tonic), whereas a cycle of fifths ...


2

You are right in the way modes can be explained. Using Ionian as a basis - the full major as we know it now, sounds 'right' when we start and finish on the root note/chord. When we use the same set of notes, but use the 6th note/chord as 'home', we think of being in a minor key. This actually often has a sharpened leading note, which makes the change back to ...


2

When talking about what composes of a scale, letter name and interval matter. In your first example although the enharmonic equivalent of #2 is a b3, you would not look at it that way in the context of a scale. If you built the scale off C you would get: C D# E F G A Bb Again while D# and Eb are enharmonic equivalents the fact that you are using ...


2

You can look at it as mode of the Romanian major scale which if built on C results in the scale: C Db E F# G A Bb If you started on the G you would get the scale you describe: G A Bb C Db E F# It's not really a common scale so there's not really an exact name. If you needed to call it something I would go with melodic minor 5b due to the fact it is ...


2

The simplest explanation of the modes is that you play a scale from a different starting note. In the C major scale, if you start the scale from the second note, D, you'll get D E F G A B C D, which is the D Dorian mode. If you start the scale from the third note, E, you'll get E F G A B C D E, which is the E Phrygian mode. Notice that in both of these ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...


2

Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...



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