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12

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


11

You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.


9

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


9

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


7

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


7

In his comment, Patrx2 listed the 8 traditional church modes: Dorian (and Hypodorian), Phrygian (and Hypophrygian), Lydian (and Hypolydian), and Mixolydian (and Hypomixolydian). The "Hypo-" forms are called plagal modes (as opposed to the four authentic modes). The plagal modes have the same "final" (tonic) and the same pitch classes as their corresponding ...


7

As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


7

The harmonic minor, and melodic minor scales are not modes of the natural minor scale. A mode is a very specific idea in music where you would start building a scale on another note of the scale. For example, A minor consists of the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A and it's built using the scale pattern W-H-W-W-H-W-W. You also may notice that C major consists ...


6

First off, the A Phrygian Dominant scale consists of the notes: A - Bb - C# - D - E - F - G You got the first part of the name right as the Phrygian part of the name does come from where Phrygian is typically derived. The dominant comes from the fact that you can build a dominant 7th chord off the tonic as A, C#, E, G spell A7. There are other scales ...


6

It's actually can be looked at modally as a chords from the Phrygian/Phrygian Dominant scales. The Phrygian scale due to its lowered third is viewed as a minor scale and thus contributes to the "sadness" you hear especially since the A would be the 3rd of the Phygian scale giving the progression a slightly more minor sound even using just major chords. ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


5

The scale that fits over all the chords given is: A B C# D E F# G A Those notes are in the D Major Scale but the intended root is A as repeated at beginning and end of chord progression in other areas of song and starts the song. Therefore it is A Mixolydian.


5

You might almost say they didn't "work" in terms of sounding good as much as those transitions help make the music sound whimsical. It's not like they fit inside some sacred rules of harmony as much as they broke the rules in a certain way that makes that theme effective in setting the tone for the show. Also the main motive is repeated (more or less) in ...


5

One of the first things to observe is that the tritone F#-C should be avoided, because it suggests a dominant sound (leading to G). Consequently, don't use the II7 chord (D7 in the case of C lydian), and don't use IVm7(b5) (F#m7(b5) in C lydian) either, because both contain the tritone. Note that the triad II (D major triad) can be used. Progressions in ...


5

Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


5

Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


4

You already mentioned the most important point in your comment to Tim's answer: you probably hear the notes of the pentatonic scale as the most consonant notes. Those notes usually sound good over all chords from the respective scale, whereas the remaining two notes can be problematic over certain chords. E.g. in C major the two notes that can be a bit ...


4

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phrygian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phrygian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phrygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, ...


4

You kind of have a skewed view of what modes actually are. The modes we name are set constructs, not based on if you build on any degree on any scale. The third scale degree is only Phrygian in Ionian(major). The scale built on the third of Aeolian(minor) is Ionian(major). The Phrygian mode does exist in Aeolian mode, but is built off scale degree 5 as ...


4

I am having some confusion is respects to the formal definition of what the various modes are. I know that their defined in relation to their scale, however, i've come to realise this may not be best way to define it. Modes are not defined by how they are related. Modes are defined by their interval pattern, by how they are constructed. There are ...


4

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


4

You can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


4

Yes, the concepts are simple. Each mode keeps the tonality of the diatonic parent scale but starts / ends on different notes. For example: Parent Scale / Ionian - C D E F G A B C Dorian - D E F G A B C D Phrygian - E F G A B C D E etc through all of the other scale degrees. When people discuss "playing in the right mode", they are talking about using ...


4

There's a much more simplified explanation of the chord progression. Let's start off by looking at the notes of each chord: D (D F# A) F# (F# A# C#) So if you want to just move between the two chords over and over again you would most likely see the notes move in this fashion: D -> C# -> D F# -> F# -> F# A -> A# -> A Notice how ...


4

I believe the sad impression is most of all due to the chromatic descent B - A♯ - A embedded in these chords. It has a kind of disillusioning effect: you start out on a nice major third of the G chord. But then you drop down to F♯, whose A♯ third is enharmonic equivalent to the G chord's minor third. Normally this wouldn't be perceived as ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


3

By the time of Bach, most of the old church modes were no longer being used. The Ionian mode stuck around, but in a common-practice context we usually call it "major." The Aeolian mode also stuck around, however it was consistently modified to usually have a raised leading tone, and often have a raise submediant as well. When the 6th and 7th scale degrees ...


3

The song definitely has the more an A Mixolydian feel then a D major feel. Both contain similar chord progressions, but there are a few signs showing A Mixolydian is the better way to look at it. First of all, the progression itself centers around A as the tonic. Also note that the dominant chord (E major) is not present in this progression which would very ...


3

First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...



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