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14

It's important to understand that mode doesn't have to be, and often isn't, an explicit choice. You wrote: The notes we play and the order is based on sound and emotion. and that's true enough, but—if you've mostly written notes from a single western key and are writing in a more or less traditional style—then the way you've used those notes will be in ...


9

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


9

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


8

Sorry, but I have to chime in after all this time. The answers given here, while accurate, convey none of the most critical distinctions, nor of how modes sound to the ear in a way different from scales. And how things sound is what music is all about. Otherwise you may as well describe the difference between, say, Leonardo Da Vinci and Claude Monet by ...


8

I hope no one minds that I got curious, and did a bit of digging into this on my own. I discovered what appears to be an excellent resource answering this very question. The book is entitled Between Modes and Keys: German Theory, 1592-1802 by Joel Lester (1989). I do not have access to a copy of the book, but I've been able to see several relevant portions ...


6

Modes and scales are just a way of ordering a series of notes. A bit like there's an order for letters - alphabet - but those letters never get used in that order (apart from the word 'no'...). A song in a particular mode will be based around a particular note. As in, that note feels like home, often a start place, and usually a finish place in a journey. ...


6

Of course there are infinite ways one might explore a scale or harmony compositionally, but one aspect of the pitch collection that made it interesting to Scriabin is that it can be used to resolve in a more-or-less traditional manner to a number of different distantly related harmonic areas. First off, a reminder about the harmonic possibilities of a ...


6

You can use V-I, although you need to prep it well. A not-unusual formula is to end with a standard Phrygian cadence (♭vii6-I), and then close it off with V-I or viiᵒ-I (often over over a tonic pedal). Also, less conventional, but using a formula that actually arose from the Phrygian cadence, is to use an augmented sixth as your dominant. (I've closed off a ...


6

You might almost say they didn't "work" in terms of sounding good as much as those transitions help make the music sound whimsical. It's not like they fit inside some sacred rules of harmony as much as they broke the rules in a certain way that makes that theme effective in setting the tone for the show. Also the main motive is repeated (more or less) in ...


5

The main note to emphasise on each mode has to be the 'key note'.As in, for example, D Dorian, the D; in G# Mixolydian, the G#. Those are the 'key centres' for the modes, and everything will gravitate towards that note. The V will not necessarily be a V,as we normally see it. In Locrian, it's going to actually be a flat five, although all the other 6 modes ...


5

The basic point that Mr. Ewer makes is correct: a mode is not the same as a key, just as a mode is not the same as a scale. However, he then confuses things by using a different definition of “key” than the one commonly used in modern Western music. Some minor scales have a major 7th, like the harmonic minor and melodic minor ascending. Other minor scales ...


5

From the Grove Online article on Mode by the late, noted musicologist Harold Powers: "[Johan Mattheson's Das neu-eröffnete Orchestre listed] the 24 major and minor keys, [which had been] first set out as a whole in 1711, only two years earlier, in Heinichen’s Neu erfundene und gründliche Anweisung … des General-Basses." Powers quotes Mattheson specifically ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


5

One of the first things to observe is that the tritone F#-C should be avoided, because it suggests a dominant sound (leading to G). Consequently, don't use the II7 chord (D7 in the case of C lydian), and don't use IVm7(b5) (F#m7(b5) in C lydian) either, because both contain the tritone. Note that the triad II (D major triad) can be used. Progressions in ...


4

For jazz in the Phrygian mode, listen to McCoy Tyner and Coltrane playing modally. C Phrygian derives from Ab major, so the notes are C, Db, Eb, F, G, Ab and Bb. This means that the scale has no major 3rd. Instead the 4th (F) is emphasised. Another feature is the b2. In C Phrygian this is Db. Here's a typical Phrygian chord: C+Db+F+Bb. When improvising, ...


4

First of all, the clefs are not quite right and the bottom part should be an octave lower (this is inferrable from the illegal 4th in the penultimate bar). Modes in Renaissance style are not the strict collections of 7 notes used in "modal" pop and jazz songs. Instead, a mode tells us where the tonic is located within a field of 11 notes, 7 diatonic and ...


4

You can't really apply these functional terms to modes. A mode refers to a specific scale and its characteristic melodic phrases. The problem with Phrygian, when you try to build classical harmony on its scale, is in fact constructing the "dominant" harmony, i.e. the triad on the 5. step. It has a diminished fifth (in "White Key Phrygian" on E this would be ...


4

Great question Dom. I think your best bet is to make sure that the two modes are distinct and separate. This is achieved through rhythmic decisions, register, counterpoint, instrumentation, and a number of other musical factors. If the lines containing the modes cross, the definition of each line becomes obscured, and therefore the harmonic contrast ...


4

The chords available to you in a given key are the same no matter what mode you choose. This is because you're still constructing the chords from the same set of 7 notes. For example, in C major, you have CDEFGAB, and no sharps or flats. That means that (ignoring "fancier" chords"), the chord on C is CEG = C major, the chord on D is DFA = D minor, and so ...


4

Each mode has it's own unique harmony associated with it and Phrygian is no different. The most notable thing about Phrygian harmony is the II chord which in E Phrygian is F. It's really strong and it is very commonly borrowed and used as what is known as a Neapolitan chord. You would want your chord progression to utilize the II chord like a dominant since ...


4

The scale that fits over all the chords given is: A B C# D E F# G A Those notes are in the D Major Scale but the intended root is A as repeated at beginning and end of chord progression in other areas of song and starts the song. Therefore it is A Mixolydian.


4

You already mentioned the most important point in your comment to Tim's answer: you probably hear the notes of the pentatonic scale as the most consonant notes. Those notes usually sound good over all chords from the respective scale, whereas the remaining two notes can be problematic over certain chords. E.g. in C major the two notes that can be a bit ...


3

With tabs you need to know some theory first on how to determine the key by the chord progression. A quick and simple way to do this is to find the first and/or last chord of the song. But learn I - IV - V twelve bar blues and how to solo with pentatonics first before hitting the modes. You need to understand basic theory before you get into anything beyond ...


3

Along with the German theorists like Lippius cited in other answers, English musicians and theorists from quite an early date also divided the keys or 'tones' into two categories based on the major or minor quality of the third above the final. At least in the seventeenth century, however, they did not use the terms 'major' and 'minor', but rather 'sharp' ...


3

A thing I noticed in 16th century music in phrygian is the heavy use of major VI harmonization -- in your case, that would be A-flat major. I have mixed feelings about this. On one hand, to the modern ear, it can very readily collapse the tonality of the piece into the relative major, losing all the nifty modality. On the other hand, it is awfully ...


3

Finger Style I would suggest you practice right-hand patterns. Your note that the exercises you found are "useless" suggests to me that the area you truly want to improve is your right-hand finger picking technique. There are 3 fundamental patterns you should master with the right hand to begin with: 1) Ascending arpeggio: Thumb, Index, Middle, Ring. ...


3

A great deal of it is improvised, much in the same sense that Indian Raga is improvised. That is to say, a lot of melodic framework and development is predetermined, but there is a lot of room to work around the predefined bits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_maqam explains this well.


3

The different modes derived from any particular scale will contain the same notes. This means that while staying in the key, you will have the same chords available to you. The main difference between being in one mode vs. another is what we treat as tonic, or home base as I like to refer to it for those that don't know the term tonic. This means that the ...


3

The song definitely has the more an A Mixolydian feel then a D major feel. Both contain similar chord progressions, but there are a few signs showing A Mixolydian is the better way to look at it. First of all, the progression itself centers around A as the tonic. Also note that the dominant chord (E major) is not present in this progression which would very ...


3

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...



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