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13

There seems to be a general confusion here. Everything you can play or imagine is possible. Theory is a means to describe music, but music is by no way bound to any theory whatsoever. Major scales are typically not a good way to describe (or play) Blues. Better suited are scales that are aptly named "blues scales" (see ...


11

The minor scale is not called the "minor scale" because it is the most minor. Names don't have to accurately reflect the definition. Modes are sometimes classified as "minor" or "major" depending on their third (a minor third usually comes with other minor degrees like the flat 7th which is common to all minor modes of the major scale). And of all the minor ...


10

I am really not knowledgable in ancient music theory so the following might be riddled with errors, but here is what I've gathered. What are the original Greek modes? Ancient Greek music scale theory was built upon the concept of the "tetrachord" - literally meaning four strings. A tetrachord consists of a group of four notes with three smaller intervals ...


10

What you are asking about doesn't really have to do with modes or accidentals. Essentially what you are talking about is the difference between modern equal temperament on the one hand, and just intonation on the other. Up until the late 1800s, musical instruments could play the traditional Greek modes and scales based on pure intervals, but a given ...


10

When you play a C Major scale and have emphasis on a note other than C, such as D, then it is D Dorian. The player implies that the D note is the root using the notes of the C Major scale. Another thing is the harmony behind the scale. What chords are being used? That would direct your ear in hearing where the root is. If I play Dmin7 chord and use the C ...


8

I'll give this a shot. Some elements contributing to a Medieval sound are Minor-key, modal melody (I think it is Dorian) Melody is catchy and song-like and follows a resolution pattern that resembles old drinking songs or sailor songs. The 6/8 rhythm also contributes to a drinking-song feel. Harmonic voice-leading features prominent parallel motion ...


8

Sure, that kind of modal shifting using the same root relationships is generally quite effective. In your particular example, you might want to raise the 7th scale degree (C to C#) for V and vii chords (much as you might do in minor) in order to get a stronger drive to the i chord, but then you wouldn't strictly be in D Dorian. Either way works but has a ...


7

For me it depends whether I'm on guitar or piano. On piano, I will base everything on the major scale of that key. So to play in C Aeolian, I would start with C major, then say "I'll need to flatten the third (E -> Eb), the 6th (A -> Ab) and the 7th (B -> Bb)" On guitar, that method doesn't work for me. On a guitar, I use the shape corresponding to the ...


6

The basic idea on how to establish a mode is make the tonal center of the progression and melody center the tonic chord of the modal scale. For example this progression would signify C major. C - F - G - C The progression stats and ends with C and the melody to accompany this would use the notes of the C major scale that would start and end with a ...


6

Yes, they're using all the same notes, but not necessarily in the right order... C maj. will be CENTRED around C, D Dorian will be CENTRED around D, E Phrygian will be... you get the picture. The home (CENTRED) note will be the mode letter. The chords may well be the same, but their function will be different, i.e. in C maj., the G will be the dominant ...


6

It's quite a big subject, but one where I believe musos are split into two camps. One, like you (and I), think in terms of a set of modes being from a 'mother key'. As in C maj.begets D dorian, E phrygian, F lydian, G mixolydian, A aeolian and B locrian. Thus, when playing in, say, G mixolydian, one uses the notes from C maj. but centres around G. The ...


6

Basically, modes come from a major scale, also known as the Ionian mode. This is your TTSTTTS spacing, note by note, as in Cmaj: CDEFGABC.Starting on the 2nd note, and rising to an octave above it, you get the Dorian mode.The next starts on the 3rd note, E in this scenario.It's the Phrygian mode. The 4th degree start gives the Lydian, the 5th ...


6

Mode mixture is a pretty common thing to see in rock music. Basically, that just means it's okay if you see chords that are outside of the key here and there--and the major chord built on the flat 7th (bVII) in particular is something you'll see a lot. For this song, I would say your analysis of D mixolydian is completely accurate. The root is undoubtedly ...


5

Taking C major/C Ionian as a start point, as in C D E F G A B C, the mode starting on note 2, D, using all the same notes, will be D Dorian. This is sometimes, confusingly, called 'the Dorian of C'. You , I think, are finding 'the Dorian of Bb', which will start on C, and use the notes from Bb maj/ Bb Ionian.Thus, the notes involved will be C D Eb F G A Bb ...


4

If you look at just a small part of the tune under a magnifying glass, so to speak, then you don't know. A D minor chord is playing, or a G7, and all the notes are from the key of C major. You could be in a II-V-I cadence or whatever. To know that you are in D Dorian, you have to step back and take a bird's eye view of the tune's structure. Strong clues ...


3

C Dorian is C D Eb F G A Bb D Dorian is D E F G A B C D So D Dorian has the same notes as your C Ionian, but you are starting from a different position. I am not sure what you mean by "Next" in the context of your question, though.


3

This is not right. The modes of the major scale each have 7 notes; instead you have listed both scales as having all 12 possible pitches, but just starting on different notes. You have listed a chromatic scale on C and a chromatic scale on D. Also, the way you describe a number of the intervals is not correct: for instance C-F# is a 4# (in your notation). ...


2

If one has designated a piece of music as being in a particular mode, e.g. D Dorian, then that is what it's in.It will be centred around D, and have a minor sound, mostly. When that feel moves, it may well have gone into a different mode.Relatives or parallels will probably have moved to a different mode.Yes, C Ionian and A Aeolian have exactly the same ...


2

I suppose this depends on how strictly modal you are trying to be. If you're trying to be really strict based on Gregorian Chant then you won't be needing any parallels or relatives. Beyond that if you do too much changing of modes it's going to sound less modal. I usually see borrowing from parallels in tonal settings. So it kind of depends on what you ...


2

I don't know this song (and having a beer in the sun, so listening is not realy an option, haha) but I think I can help you though. First of all, I would like to advise you to write in the same key if you want this kind of info, it's much easier to see what is the "odd thing" here (more about the "odd thing" below) Secondly, you should ask yourself the ...


2

A "mode" is simply a scale that has been altered in some way. The unaltered natural major scale is playing in Ionian mode. The unaltered natural minor scale is playing in Aeolian mode. The other modes can be constructed by altering the natural minor or major scales. For example the Phrygian mode can be formed by a natural minor scale with a flattened 2nd. ...


2

The key word is 'harmonically'. Blues does not follow all the harmonic rules. While it technically can be harmonically analyzed and it mostly follows the rules at the end of the day it is different because it is based on some non harmonic ideas, like the blues scale. I may have gotten you to think that all out of key chords and notes can be explained by ...


2

A lot of people look at mode and think they need to learn every little thing they can about them for them to be useful. That will bog down most beginner guitarist who don't know their use in music. The basic ideas that everyone who learns modes should know about is why they exist and why they are useful. Like you said above the basic idea for each is a ...


2

Scale degrees are always made from the notes in the scale so you have a lot of unnecessary notes in your example above. It should look like this. C Ionian: C D E F G A B C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 D Dorian: D E F G A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 They have the same scale degrees because each scale has 7 notes in it, but the distance between the scale degrees may vary ...


1

To expand on Dom's excellent answer, when you're in D dorian, it will sound quite minor, except that for the 4th chord, instead of the expected Gm, you'll use G maj. On the mixolydian, G, it'll sound major, but a bit bluesy because of the flat 7.The 5th chord won't sound too pushy, though, as it's Dm rather than D maj. As above, you'll use all the same ...


1

As I'm more coming from a rock / pop background, I always begin my thinking at the pentatonic. Whatever mode you're playing, the notes of the pentatonic will always be in there (except for locrian, but honestly, who plays that anyway? ;-)), so I just "fill in" the missing notes needed for each mode. Maybe this gets more clear With examples, so here you go: ...


1

This has to do with common practice era harmony. A minor key should consist of a minor triad on the tonic. Phrygian, Dorian and Aeolian all fit this bill. The next most important chord in common practice harmony is the V chord and if you are a common practice era composer, you would want a good triad for your V chord. Phrygian's V chord is diminished, so ...


1

I agree. In particular, it reminds me of the Nibelungenlied (as sung by Knud Seckel). I hear three clear similarities: the melody, which uses the same incomplete scale and is actually quite similar the harmonization, which stresses fifths and does not use the fuller chords we're accustomed to from later European music the instrumentation, which is sparse ...


1

Each mode is defined by its pattern of tones and half-tones. The notes played depend on the tonic of the scale (= where you start). If you play a C scale in Ionian mode, it means that you start on C and then follow the Ionian pattern of tones and semitones. The scale is the set of notes that you play, so the "next" one does not really mean something. If you ...


1

I this picture you can see the Mixolyidan mode is the fifth mode of the major scale. There are different dominant scales. To be considered dominant the scale must have a major third (3) and a minor seventh (b7).



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