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12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


11

You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.


9

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


7

In his comment, Patrx2 listed the 8 traditional church modes: Dorian (and Hypodorian), Phrygian (and Hypophrygian), Lydian (and Hypolydian), and Mixolydian (and Hypomixolydian). The "Hypo-" forms are called plagal modes (as opposed to the four authentic modes). The plagal modes have the same "final" (tonic) and the same pitch classes as their corresponding ...


7

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


7

As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


7

The harmonic minor, and melodic minor scales are not modes of the natural minor scale. A mode is a very specific idea in music where you would start building a scale on another note of the scale. For example, A minor consists of the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A and it's built using the scale pattern W-H-W-W-H-W-W. You also may notice that C major consists ...


6

First off, the A Phrygian Dominant scale consists of the notes: A - Bb - C# - D - E - F - G You got the first part of the name right as the Phrygian part of the name does come from where Phrygian is typically derived. The dominant comes from the fact that you can build a dominant 7th chord off the tonic as A, C#, E, G spell A7. There are other scales ...


6

It's actually can be looked at modally as a chords from the Phrygian/Phrygian Dominant scales. The Phrygian scale due to its lowered third is viewed as a minor scale and thus contributes to the "sadness" you hear especially since the A would be the 3rd of the Phygian scale giving the progression a slightly more minor sound even using just major chords. ...


5

Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


5

Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


4

You kind of have a skewed view of what modes actually are. The modes we name are set constructs, not based on if you build on any degree on any scale. The third scale degree is only Phrygian in Ionian(major). The scale built on the third of Aeolian(minor) is Ionian(major). The Phrygian mode does exist in Aeolian mode, but is built off scale degree 5 as ...


4

I am having some confusion is respects to the formal definition of what the various modes are. I know that their defined in relation to their scale, however, i've come to realise this may not be best way to define it. Modes are not defined by how they are related. Modes are defined by their interval pattern, by how they are constructed. There are ...


4

Yes, the concepts are simple. Each mode keeps the tonality of the diatonic parent scale but starts / ends on different notes. For example: Parent Scale / Ionian - C D E F G A B C Dorian - D E F G A B C D Phrygian - E F G A B C D E etc through all of the other scale degrees. When people discuss "playing in the right mode", they are talking about using ...


4

You can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


4

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phrygian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phrygian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phrygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, ...


4

There's a much more simplified explanation of the chord progression. Let's start off by looking at the notes of each chord: D (D F# A) F# (F# A# C#) So if you want to just move between the two chords over and over again you would most likely see the notes move in this fashion: D -> C# -> D F# -> F# -> F# A -> A# -> A Notice how ...


4

I believe the sad impression is most of all due to the chromatic descent B - A♯ - A embedded in these chords. It has a kind of disillusioning effect: you start out on a nice major third of the G chord. But then you drop down to F♯, whose A♯ third is enharmonic equivalent to the G chord's minor third. Normally this wouldn't be perceived as ...


3

The reason why a Bb is used instead of a B has to do with the key aspects of the Lydian mode itself which is the #4 and how it acts. The only difference between the Ionian mode and the Lydian is the 4th which is perfect in the Ionian mode and augmented in the Lydian mode. In Fux's counterpoint whatever mode you were in, you would want your cantus firmus and ...


3

By the time of Bach, most of the old church modes were no longer being used. The Ionian mode stuck around, but in a common-practice context we usually call it "major." The Aeolian mode also stuck around, however it was consistently modified to usually have a raised leading tone, and often have a raise submediant as well. When the 6th and 7th scale degrees ...


3

First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...


3

Yes this scale actually exits and it's a mode of A Neapolitan Minor which contains the notes: A Bb C D E F G# A This scale starting on C in particular would be called Mixolydian Augmented due to it resembling the Mixolydian scale, but one where you would create an augmented chord off the tonic chord. C D E F G# A Bb C You can also think ...


3

Aeolian with a diminished first, while that is possible in a theoretical sense, isn't likely to appear in actual music. What I hear when listening to the first bars of the track is an emphasis on the minor third gap between the sixth and seventh degree of the harmonic minor scale (I don't have a keyboard in front of me to confirm the actual notes, but see ...


3

will it switch like this (C Ionian -> C Mixolydian) or like this (C Ionian -> G Mixolydian)? Both; depends on what you want to do and where you want to go from the mode you are on. Let's look closely at these two examples. We are in C Ionian mode (C major); if you go to C Mixolydian, you'll find yourself in the V mode of the F Ionian mode. We are in C ...


3

This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


3

It really depends on if you want to think more tonal while using modes or modal while using modes. Modal progressions themselves don't fall in line with the typical tonal progressions for example V-I in Ionian is tonal not modal. However, we are used to hearing music progressions that are tonal in nature so the typical V-I, IV-I, V-i, iv-i, or v-i ...


2

I'm a composition student at UCLA who is in the process of writing his dissertation, which on one level, has a lot to do with modes - so it's on my mind a lot these days (which led me to this site). Here are my thoughts: Robert Fink's answer (above) is an excellent answer. This is the type of answer you would get from someone who has studied music for a ...


2

Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...


2

This scale is often called double harmonic scale. In my experience (i.e., in popular music) that's the standard name for that scale. Arguably the most famous use of that scale in popular music is Dick Dale's Misirlou. And, by the way, the double harmonic scale and the Hungarian minor scale are modes of each other.



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