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1

I agree to @ToddWilcox: The simpson theme broke all "sacred" rules, plus, it seems that the composer WANTED to create a LYDIAN theme. Since the lydian mode is rather unusual for untrained ears, he repeated the theme in multiple keys in order to fix the lydian sound. And by the way: If you see Db as the subV of G (Db is a tritonus below G), then in fact ...


6

You might almost say they didn't "work" in terms of sounding good as much as those transitions help make the music sound whimsical. It's not like they fit inside some sacred rules of harmony as much as they broke the rules in a certain way that makes that theme effective in setting the tone for the show. Also the main motive is repeated (more or less) in ...


5

One of the first things to observe is that the tritone F#-C should be avoided, because it suggests a dominant sound (leading to G). Consequently, don't use the II7 chord (D7 in the case of C lydian), and don't use IVm7(b5) (F#m7(b5) in C lydian) either, because both contain the tritone. Note that the triad II (D major triad) can be used. Progressions in ...


4

You already mentioned the most important point in your comment to Tim's answer: you probably hear the notes of the pentatonic scale as the most consonant notes. Those notes usually sound good over all chords from the respective scale, whereas the remaining two notes can be problematic over certain chords. E.g. in C major the two notes that can be a bit ...


3

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


2

Chord tones. The notes contained within a particular chord will generally sound best over that chord. E.g. C maj7 has C,E,G and B,, so those notes will fit best.Generally the 1,3,5 and sometimes an extra note or two from the key. Dm = D, F and A, 1,3 and 5. Yes, if you see two, three, four notes in a bar that constitute a chord, then play that chord under ...


9

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


2

If I understand your wording in the question, there's confusion over terminology. D Dorian is the Dorian mode centered around and rooted on D. It contains all of the notes from its parent scale of C major. The Dorian of C is another, less common, way of naming it. Subtle difference in name, but using different notes! D Dorian - D E F G A B C, Dorian OF D - ...



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