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The reason why a Bb is used instead of a B has to do with the key aspects of the Lydian mode itself which is the #4 and how it acts. The only difference between the Ionian mode and the Lydian is the 4th which is perfect in the Ionian mode and augmented in the Lydian mode. In Fux's counterpoint whatever mode you were in, you would want your cantus firmus and ...


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I'm a composition student at UCLA who is in the process of writing his dissertation, which on one level, has a lot to do with modes - so it's on my mind a lot these days (which led me to this site). Here are my thoughts: Robert Fink's answer (above) is an excellent answer. This is the type of answer you would get from someone who has studied music for a ...


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you can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


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As in Matt L's comment, listening to pieces in different modes will help clarify them. For example, out of the 7, Ionian is the main (major) one used in so many pieces now. It centres around note 1, and 'feels right'. Aeolian, our go to minor, obviously uses the same notes, but centres around note 6. Often, to make it work better with its centre, the v chord ...


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Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


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Different unterlying harmonies, tonal focus, chord sequences and cadenze. You seem to have no problem with A minor having the same notes as C major and still sounding different, so how is that different from other modes?


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This scale is often called double harmonic scale. In my experience (i.e., in popular music) that's the standard name for that scale. Arguably the most famous use of that scale in popular music is Dick Dale's Misirlou. And, by the way, the double harmonic scale and the Hungarian minor scale are modes of each other.


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The scale is known as the flamenco mode or Major-Phrygian and as far as I am concerned is the most popular variant of that set of notes. Off the top of my head I don't know any songs that contain this scale, but it is used all the time in flamenco music along with Phrygian dominant. Melody wise, you would probably want to take advantage of how symmetric ...


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First off, let's examine what chords are used in this song. There are many versions of the transcription of this song, most do not have the F#7 and instead have just a F#m which after listening to the song to confirm seems right: F#m A B E D C#7 All the chord besides the B,which can be viewed as borrowed from the parallel major key of F# major, can be ...


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To me this just seems obviously to be in F# minor. So: Main riff: i III IV Bridge: VII i VII V7 Then the D and A chords give a D majorish, D lydian kind of sound but it still ends with a VII i cadence so you could maybe argue we're still in F#minor. chorus: VI(I) III(V) VII(II) i(iii) Then the C#7 at the end of the chorus works to take us back squarely ...


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Yeah I'm going to have nightmares tonight. Definitely A is the root, there's no doubting that. That makes E the dominant, which is why the song has strange E chords before A chords - a "V - I" progression. Upon listening to the melody, it seems to me that the notes in the scale are all natural except for that pesky Bb. This means that the major scale for ...



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