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To get started I'll offer a short answer to these two questions almost - but not entirely Yes - by providing real world examples which are accessible to everyone Index Just some short basics so that everyone is one the same page A little aside to honor pentatonic scales Modality and potential confusion when it gets 'jazzy'... The ...


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The reason a mode sounds different is simple: which note is targeted as the base. which means which note is emphasized more than others. really it's a combination of the base note and the fifth above it. emphasizing these two notes more than the others give a different sort of tonality than a home base of "C and G".


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All relative scales work the same no matter the scale. For example in the case of major and minor pentatonic scales in your example the C major pentatonic scales and the A minor pentatonic scales contain the sames notes as you can see here: C Major pentatonic: C D E G A A Minor pentatonic: A C D E G The differences is what the tonic (or root) ...


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I have been researching modes recently and 'The Concise Explanation of Church Modes' by CC Spencer was recommenced as a place to start my research. According to Spencer each plagal mode and its harmonizations' were "ruled" by the modes corresponding authentic scale. For instance while Hypo-Dorian would start a fourth below the opening tone of D it would ...


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I have a similar approach like @Dom but there is one thing I do feel very differently. If it were a major scale in F - the pattern of the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th that has way more the taste of a minor scale wouldn't be so molesting to my western ears. In german this is also called 'harmonic major' because it resembles both - the major scale and the harmonic ...


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If you are writing two-voice species counterpoint according to Fux's rules, and the cantus firmus is in the bottom voice and that bottom voice descends by step to the final in the Phyrgian mode--that is, the bass moves down a minor second from F to E in an untransposed mode; then the upper voice in two-voice counterpoint sings D--E, because the final ...


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you can play the d7 but with the C on bass , you play also the c7 M +11 as mentioned above ( with a tritone ! ) .


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Don't try to learn all the modes at once. Each mode has a distinctive "flavor" that can only be recognized with practice so concentrate on mastering the sound of one mode at a time. You have had your whole life to get used to the sounds of the traditional major and minor scales and these patterns are deeply ingrained - even untrained musicians can usually ...


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Historically these modes arose as ways of describing and categorizing music that already existed. For medieval liturgical song, or Gregorian chant, the system of modes made it easier to match antiphon chants with a psalm tone. The right psalm tone would mean that at the end of the psalm it was easy to go back and sing the antiphon again. The modes describe ...


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If you want to get all pedantic about it, you can think of the I7 chord as being a tonic and ALSO being V7->IV. In other words, you're chaining extended dominant structures together, and when you do so, you create momentary "local" resolution tendencies, but become detached from the grand-scheme dominant resolution architecture. In the blues, the I chord ...


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As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


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You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.



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