New answers tagged

1

Actually, the standard key signature for any mode comprises the sharps or flats (or combination of both - see some of Bartók's pieces) that define the mode. In the case of B Locrian, that means an empty key signature, as B Locrian uses the same heptatonic collection as C major/A minor. Key signatures don't really exist to specify the key (despite the name),...


3

Since the root, or tonic of Locrian of C is B, it could be written with the key sig. of 5# for B maj., or 2# for B min., more likely the latter, as Locrian is more minor than major. That would mean putting naturals on F and C, which would probably encourage a reader to think it's modal, and Locrian. Don't know why you suggest B#, as it's enharmonically C, ...


0

In western scales, there are a total of 7 notes. They repeat infinitely ascending, and descending. You can break them up on the guitar into 7 convenient "sets" for easier memorization, but even each set can be made in multiple ways. For example you can have a scale set of 2 notes per string, 2's and 3's, all 3's, all 4's ect, and still play the same notes. ...


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The reason is because the major scale consists of seven notes. If you think about the jumps between notes, there is only a half step between the 3rd and 4th notes, and 7th and 1st notes. So the third scale form covers both Phrygian and Lydian, and the 1st scale form covers the Locrian and Ionian modes (Assuming of course that you're playing them over chords ...


0

Church Modes The modes originated in Christian chant, and you asked for a practical difference, so here is an answer from a chanter's perspective. First, let me regurgitate the theory, then I'll give examples, and my own commentary. Theory Authentic and plagal have the same tonic. Their cadences vary here and there, just like any song, but they always ...


1

First off, the key of D is ambiguous. A key represents a tonal center and expected harmony with the the normal two being major and minor. Just saying key of D you aren't specifying if it is major or minor. Again modes are not tonal and the idea of a key is so not everything translates 100% between tonal and modal ideas. You could say the key is D Dorian ...


1

You'd say it's in D Dorian, rather than Dorian D.Like you say C major rather than major C. But be careful, as there are two ways to describe it. The Dorian of D is different from D Dorian. The former has 2 sharps, because it's the mode of D that centres around E, whereas the latter uses C major notes, but is centred around D. I've heard both used, and it can ...


5

A tonic is a tonal concept, so it doesn't transfer 100% when you talk about modes as they are not tonal ideas. The simple answer is yes to be in D Dorian you need to make it sound like you have D as your "tonic" or else you are not in D Dorian. If your tonic is C then you are in C major, not D Dorian.


2

The tonic is D (d-minor as a chord). The cadence in d-dorian would be X: 1 M: C K: Cmaj L: 1/2 [Gdgb] [A^cea] | [Ddfa]2 Though I daresay you'll find rather more often the relative dominant C-major used, rather than the actual dominant A-major. X: 1 M: C K: Cmaj L: 1/2 [Gdgb] [Cegc'] | [Ddfa]2


5

The tonic of Dorian D is D. In fact this is more or less what makes the difference between the modes. Altough they can have exactly the same notes, the function of those notes, how they are used, is different. In dorian D, D is used as the tonic: i.e. the piece ends with D, the main phrases end in D, the D minor chord is the most important chord...


0

A good question! I'd say technically in D Dorian, D is the tonic, as that's the 'key' it's in, and the start point. However, musically, it could feel like it wants to 'come home', and depending on how it's sounding, it could come to rest, sounding good, back at C. So then, one could say the tonic is C.


-1

Natural minor is a mode, however I would call the harmonic and melodic minor scales functional variations of natural minor rather than strictly their own modes. In minor harmonies, the seventh scale note is almost always raised, which creates a harmonic minor. Using the harmonic minor scale in melodic settings would create a really ugly augmented second ...


1

Every scale has modes. As you shift what note in the pattern you start on, you come up with a different pattern that is related to the original scale pattern. The names of the modes however, are not named the same way as the diatonic modes. The names of the modes are not based off scale degrees, but how the notes look compared to the scales/modes of the ...


7

Think of modes as the scale starting off at different notes. So, yes there are modes both for the harmonic and melodic minor scales. In jazz, the melodic minor scale isn't the same as the classical one. It is the same while ascending and descending. So, the C melodic minor scale would be C D Eb F G A B C. here are the melodic minor modes: The harmonic ...


0

All diatonic modes are the same scale starting on different notes. While you can think of different modes for each chord, I find that approach to be way too complicated for live performance. Moreover, that approach tends to lead to playing scales rather than creating interesting and catchy melodies. Take the chord tones for each bar as your "strong" notes ...


1

I know it's an old discussion, but I thought I might add my five cents: I'm working on the "Gradus" these days (Mann's translation) and have asked myself the same question. Then I remembered that in footnote 9 to Chapter one Mann says that "the tritone is to be avoided even when reached stepwise (f-g-a-b) IF THE LINE IS NOT CONTINUED STEPWISE AND IN THE ...


0

A melody is comprised of notes, usually from a particular key. Those notes could and often do, add up to the scale of that key, when put in order, with root first. Thus, in A, there'll be A,B,C#,D,E,F# and G#.So, a tune in A will use those notes in the main.Take any of those notes, and stack the next but one and the next but one to that, and maybe one more, ...


1

That is totally a matter of style, given the combination you have there. If you wanted a Spanish guitar sound and kind of dark, use phrygian. If you want a jazzy/blues feeling, use Dorian. However, if you use Dorian with the minor chords toward the beginning of the progression, I would probably give Mixolydian a try on the major chord to maintain the bluesy ...



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