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1

Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...


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These all just look like a minor which modulates to the sub dominant key (d minor ). This is further emphasised in the manner in which the c# and g# resolve to the d and a respectively. Also this seems to me to be a baroque transcription of a piece that very well may have had its existence rooted in the renaissance. There seems to be a distinct minor ...


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In regards to any person, be it author or any other, pertaining to the exact history or meaning behind the modes is technically and historically impossible. This is due to the fact the original modes developed by the ancient Greeks goes as far back as 300 or 400 B.C.!!! or the Hellenistic period. Greece was then subsequently through the proceeding ages ...


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Without knowing more than a little bit about the history of Western harmony and its scales, I am comfortable saying you should not look to this author for history lessons. The reason I write that is because he wrote the words "white" and "Aryan" as synonyms in 1913 which highly suggests his history is racist. There are other aspects of the history he wrote ...


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again, some simple rules and observations for working with modes in this case;(1) your song in "C minor" is already in a mode known as C-Aeolian (the natural minor 6th mode of the C-maj. scale)(2)Ionian and Aeolian are the exception to the rule and the only 2 modes of the C-Maj., scale that can have a tonal center/key- depending on how they are used (3)If ...


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A progression that defines rock music in a way that is derived from blues music, and you'll see that often, is using the bIII chord in a major key, along with the IV and V (or V7) chord. E.g. E and G. G here fits within de E minor pentatonic scale. It's quite common to see E going to G, and then to A, making a I, bIII, IV progression. You can hear it in ...


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I've seen this quote from Charlie Parker in many places... "I was working over 'Cherokee' and, as l did, I found that by using the higher intervals of a chord as a melody line and backing them with the appropriately related changes, I could play the thing I'd been hearing. I came alive." The part "higher intervals of a chord as a melody line" catches my ...


3

will it switch like this (C Ionian -> C Mixolydian) or like this (C Ionian -> G Mixolydian)? Both; depends on what you want to do and where you want to go from the mode you are on. Let's look closely at these two examples. We are in C Ionian mode (C major); if you go to C Mixolydian, you'll find yourself in the V mode of the F Ionian mode. We are in C ...


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Key signature and note collection notwithstanding, a musical composition that is written in F Lydian is NOT a mode of the key of C major - even though the key signature would be the same as for C major and all of the notes in F Lydian are also in C major. In fact, the so called “key signature” does not always tell you what key a musical work is written ...


0

let's simplify this and first answer a couple of basic questions about modes and modal music; (1) All music is modal (2) A true mode (other than Maj./Ionian or natural minor/Aeolian ) are limited to 5 tones and only to 1 octave range, from the tonic to the dominant. In other words, 5 tones are not enough to establish either major nor minor ...


1

F lydian has the same key signature as C major (in other words it has the same notes, the same number of sharps and flats, in this case zero.) It also has the same key signature as A minor. However all three are different keys, because they have different tonal centres. A key is named after the note it tends to gravitate to. A passage in A minor clearly ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


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No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...



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