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4

A past iteration of the Wikipedia page on Mozart's compositional method had a good summary of the mythologization that took place regarding Mozart in the 19th century. (The fact that that page has been substantially reworked is a testament to the extent to which that process is still contentious today.) Note, the following is an old wikipedia link ...


2

Other posters have pretty much captured it, I think, but it might help to think of yourself retelling a joke you just heard. Chances are you don't remember it word-for-word, and if you were trying to recall it that way, you'd fail. You do remember the basic shape and form of the joke (probably not least because it shares the shape and form in common with ...


2

I had a professor tell us about a comp lesson with Igor Stravinsky once. (I know right?!?) He paged once, slowly through the piece my professor brought at his desk then moved to the piano and started playing excerpts pointing out places that could have been different and why they might work better.... leaving the score at his desk. So I'd say totally ...


11

All documented resources I can find agree with the story. The Pope, instead of excommunicating Mozart, conferred on him the Order of the Golden Spur, a papal knighthood, for "contributing to the glory of the Church" through his transcription of the Miserere. The record of that award, as well as the minutes of that audience, are part of the archives of the ...


18

Neuroscience still can't explain some of the amazing things human brains can do. A person alive in our time has interesting and similar ability to mentally manage music in a way that suggests that some people might be wired for this sort of thing. The study detailed at http://www.radiolab.org/story/148670-4-track-mind/ showed that Bob Milne has the ability ...


18

It's worth noting that the Miserere is extremely repetitive. For example, this version is roughly 15 minutes long, but you get all the melodic and harmonic content in the first 2:45 except for the final cadence; everything after that is more verses set to the same music. Mozart still would have had to remember the varying text overlay as well as any ...


6

I agree with what microtherion says: Most professional classical pianists who practice pieces during all their lives end up remembering an outstanding succession of notes and rhythm and this is mostly due to patterns (physical, visual, melodic, etc.) that help organize and make sense of what they recall. If you were to present a professionally trained ...


23

I wasn't there, but I would not find it completely out of the question. In every field of expertise, experts are capable of chunking information in ways that amateurs are not. An expert listener will not just hear a few hundred notes performed by several voices, they will hear harmonies, their relationships to each other, and rhythmical patterns. More ...


5

The explanation is very simple: Mozart never called it a rondo in the first place. Look at the urtext edition here: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/nma_cont.php?vsep=197&gen=edition&l=1&p1=24 The Wikipedia analysis seems rather over-simplified. Look at the score and figure it out for yourself - it's not hard to follow. The entire sonata has ...


10

Not every rondo is the exact same form. There are many different types of rondos with the most popular variations being A-B-A, A-B-A-C-A, and A-B-A-C-A-B'-A (the last one being comparable to your definition). A rondo is defined by repetition (the A section in most cases) and you start with one musical idea go somewhere else (typically refereed to as an ...



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