Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

DISCLOSURE: I'm also a full-time programmer but I got my degree in music. I'm finding the best way to make it work is to be disciplined and schedule specific amount of time. This is a skill I learned in school, as I was a composition major so I had to have a concentration instrument (which for me was the double bass), pass piano proficiency, pass ...


6

Speaking as a brass doubler (trombone is my primary; I play all other brass instruments with varying proficiencies), the main difference between the embouchures for trumpet and trombone has to do with the tone concept. The trombone itself (and current pedagogy and instrument manufacturing) allows for a very open and dark tone concept, and the fact that ...


4

I'm a professional tubist, and I also play trumpet as well - among other noise makers. I can tell you first-hand that playing trumpet or other instruments will generally not affect your ability to play tuba. It is good you are staying within the brass family as it is the least discouraging. When moving through brass instruments of different sizes, it is ...


4

If the player has a good ear (and you're not asking them to do really virtuosic playing), then the "embouchure shock" should be fairly minimal. As long as they're still reading transposed treble clef music, the fingerings will be exactly the same, with the notable exception of french horn (or is that a brass band instrument to start with?). Tuba doesn't ...


4

It's very different! The mouthpiece is smaller than a trumpet's, yet the instrument's range covers that of a trombone. And, while you can get away with playing flugelhorn like a trumpet, if you play the horn like a trumpet not many people are going to want to listen to you. My advice would be to essentially relearn the horn fingerings from scratch instead ...


4

Saxophone at an advanced level will require you to do a bunch of stuff with your throat (voicing) that you probably won't be used to as a trombonist. I would personally recommend that you keep your trombone practice up as you begin to learn saxophone. The embouchures use somewhat different muscle groups, so practicing both daily will keep you on your toes ...


3

The brass players I know and play with all seem to double on some other brass instrument. While it may take some time to adapt, I think it benefits to be able to know the different instruments. Think of it this way if you drive a car: In your own car you get to know the clutch and know when to shift gears, then when you drive another car you suddenly get ...


3

I often find it difficult to practice the others. It's kind of when you like one, you will like others less. Think about why you want to play them, one reason is because you want to learn them. But even then, you might meet instruments that you really don't like playing. Consider learning another instrument that you could like instead, as that will ...


3

Are you referring to a different sized mouthpiece for the saxophone? Or are you referring to the difference in size of brass mouthpieces? Assuming you are referring to the saxophone, each type of saxophone will have a different size mouthpiece. By that I mean the soprano saxophone uses one size, alto saxophone larger, tenor saxophone larger than that, and ...


2

I am currently trying to double high and low brass. My trumpet playing isn't great yet, but T-bone is unaffected. Not problem. I've been playing T-bone for years and marched the previous season. My band no longer marches T-bone, sad, but I though why not learn high brass. So I'm learning mellophone and trumpet. It is exactly like piano and organ or piano and ...


2

Your biggest problem may be reading in the bass clef. The valves on most (I think) 3 valved brass do the same job, and the dots will be in a key which compensates for the pitch (as in, if it's a Bb instrument, and the tune is in C, the dots will be written in D ). Don't feel the embouchure will be a big deal, and you'll quickly re-adapt after. In fact, you ...


1

Most brass band players I know can play more than one instrument: after all, this is the main point of the "instruments in different keys" system for three-valved instruments. That said, when a player ends up playing different instruments in different bands (so they have to switch over the course of each week), they usually find that a little uncomfortable ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible