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There are many, many answers to your question, and all answers come from a slightly different standpoint. If you want a relatively recent scholarly view on scales, check out the notion of maximal evenness. Basically, it suggests that Western and non-Western scales may be constructed (both in terms of number of pitches and intervals between them) in such a ...


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In general, scales tend to have about seven notes in them, or "seven, plus/minus two". This number is believed to have to do with cognitive limitations; it would be difficult to recall more notes. On the other hand, scales with fewer notes impose more melodic and harmonic limitations. In order to answer whether or not it is a coincidence that Indian and ...


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The characteristics of a chaconne will not be the same in every time period and country. That said, generally when I see that the name of a piece is "chaconne", I expect a repeated bassline, most often a descending tetrachord (from the tonic to the dominant). I should note the similarity to a passacaglia, which also frequently makes use of a descending ...


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The repeating part is often in the bass. The Ferrari sound to me like: I, V, vi, iii (or I6),IV, V, in the key of E major. So does the Caccini, when the bass kicks in after a short intro, but in the key of B major. I didn't listen to the others to see if they were also identical.


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Seems like there is an alternation between G major and A minor (or G major and E major) regions. La Foia, the Passamezzo Antico, and Romanesca all do similar things. There are some scores of these pieces hanging around the net.


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Please, listen more closely. Modern music is not a standard to decide whether or not birds are musical. They do indeed sing phrases, that have their own mode or key. Listen to finches and warblers at noon during mating season. An important thing to remember about birdsong is that it is EXTREMELY fast. Not only are the phrases being sung in a blisteringly ...


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Let's talk about the music before we talk about the metric breakdown. The piece is in cut time (2/2) and the first measure is a pickup and starts from the second beat. In cut time you would count this meter as 1 - 2 where beat 1 would be felt as a stronger beat. What this is showing in a very round about way is the note hierarchy and how it lines up with ...



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