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12

The noises are caused by electronics picking up wireless signals from your mobile phone and translating the interference into sound. Well-shielded circuits won't have this problem, but it's common in consumer electronics and some musical equipment, notably guitar leads. There's no damage to your equipment, and if the sound is a problem just keep the phone ...


8

My guess is that the direction the finger is moving is not perpendicular to the fretboard. And so you are in effect plucking the string with the small bit of flesh caused by the indentation of the string itself. When you fret the string, the string frets you, so to speak. The string creates an indentation in the surface of the fingertip which will recover ...


6

As per the previous answers, there are electronic kits that are effectively silent, insofar as you only get the sound of a stick striking a rubber pad or, in the cases of some e-kits, mesh heads. However, I'm an acoustic drummer and I've found playing on electronic kits to be problematic: they're invariably fixed to a frame, so you can be limited in where ...


3

Fingers can sometimes stick to strings if they do not have good calluses. The third and fourth fingers might have this problem more than the index and middle fingers because they do not get used as often. If you work on building up calluses on these fingers, the problem might lessen.


3

Izotope RX has a tool called de-construct, which is basically a mixer between the tonal and noisy parts of a sound, tonal being the partials that are related. To achieve what you want you set the tonal gain fader to -inf (the lowest). It is not a real time tool, though.


2

The above two answers are correct, however, here is some more details: It's called electrostatic interference. It's caused by unbalanced cables picking up radio waves, basically acting as a radio antenna. If you are using an amplifier or a loud speaker this may be fixed by running a balanced cable instead or an unbalanced cable. If you go to purchase one ...


2

While I can't provide the answer, I can tell you that a compressor won't do quite what you're describing. When the compressor is triggered it will decrease the gain of everything going through the chain. So, if your feedback is overwhelming the mix and triggers the compressor, then everything will get compressed, making everything you want emphasized ...


1

Mesh is quiter. I have a Roland TD-8 (all mesh drums) and have compared that to rubber pads. The issue (which I also have) is twofold : The sound coming from the pad itself, and how much is transferred to the floor- which then transfers to adjacent rooms and of course to the room under you. The rubber pad is a solid hit - quiet, but transfers the shock of ...


1

This is a good start for anyone who needs a sub-$30 drum riser solution: I strongly recommend just buying a few tiles of "foam plywood sub-floor" (see link below). I bought 6 and stapled a cheap rug to them to prevent them from spreading apart. It acts as a great insulate drum riser, and has the added benefit of providing a uniform carpeted surface that ...


1

Another thing you can use is a high quality digital delay for the high frequencies through the stage mains since they travel faster then the bass frequencies. Things will sound less muddled. You can also use a 3rd and 4th speaker in the back of the room with the live mix delayed on the stage mains and the rear or mid-room speakers non-delayed. Van Halen ...



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