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13

The noises are caused by electronics picking up wireless signals from your mobile phone and translating the interference into sound. Well-shielded circuits won't have this problem, but it's common in consumer electronics and some musical equipment, notably guitar leads. There's no damage to your equipment, and if the sound is a problem just keep the phone ...


4

Izotope RX has a tool called de-construct, which is basically a mixer between the tonal and noisy parts of a sound, tonal being the partials that are related. To achieve what you want you set the tonal gain fader to -inf (the lowest). It is not a real time tool, though.


2

The above two answers are correct, however, here is some more details: It's called electrostatic interference. It's caused by unbalanced cables picking up radio waves, basically acting as a radio antenna. If you are using an amplifier or a loud speaker this may be fixed by running a balanced cable instead or an unbalanced cable. If you go to purchase one ...


2

This sounds perfectly normal; humbuckers get their name because they "buck the hum", the hum being electrical interference which the coils are picking up like an antenna. A humbucker is effectively two single coils configured to cancel out the interference from each other. The exact noise you'll hear can vary quite a bit depending on the building's wiring ...


2

You are experiencing electrical interference from one or more external sources. Single-coil pickups are particularly sensitive to this. For instance, are you using the guitar in front of a computer with an old-style cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor? Are you playing in a room illuminated by flourescent tube lighting? You may need to play your guitar in a room ...


2

Do they have problems with the snare, or is it really just the kick? I'd be willing to bet that half the problem is from the pedal stomping rather than the actual kick drum sound. Actually, I just realized you said you already have mute pads on, so it's probably a little more than just half the problem. They probably can't really hear much of the actual drum ...


1

I believe such a tool would first have to know how to determine what the un-noisy signal sounded like. I don't know of a tool that will do all of this together, but you might be able to cobble together a rudimentary version of such a tool from existing tools. I don't know how well it would work... For example, Reaper (and probably most DAWs) has a ...



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