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6

My guess is that the direction the finger is moving is not perpendicular to the fretboard. And so you are in effect plucking the string with the small bit of flesh caused by the indentation of the string itself. When you fret the string, the string frets you, so to speak. The string creates an indentation in the surface of the fingertip which will recover ...


5

As per the previous answers, there are electronic kits that are effectively silent, insofar as you only get the sound of a stick striking a rubber pad or, in the cases of some e-kits, mesh heads. However, I'm an acoustic drummer and I've found playing on electronic kits to be problematic: they're invariably fixed to a frame, so you can be limited in where ...


2

If you can't treat the room, you can try optimizing using the sound system and the band. Control sound radiation so it beams as much as possible towards the audience and absorptive surfaces and away from any reflective surfaces. Monitor wedges are the worst. They beam up and back directly at backwall and ceiling. Wedges have their place on large stages but ...


2

While I can't provide the answer, I can tell you that a compressor won't do quite what you're describing. When the compressor is triggered it will decrease the gain of everything going through the chain. So, if your feedback is overwhelming the mix and triggers the compressor, then everything will get compressed, making everything you want emphasized ...


1

Mesh is quiter. I have a Roland TD-8 (all mesh drums) and have compared that to rubber pads. The issue (which I also have) is twofold : The sound coming from the pad itself, and how much is transferred to the floor- which then transfers to adjacent rooms and of course to the room under you. The rubber pad is a solid hit - quiet, but transfers the shock of ...


1

This is a good start for anyone who needs a sub-$30 drum riser solution: I strongly recommend just buying a few tiles of "foam plywood sub-floor" (see link below). I bought 6 and stapled a cheap rug to them to prevent them from spreading apart. It acts as a great insulate drum riser, and has the added benefit of providing a uniform carpeted surface that ...


1

Another thing you can use is a high quality digital delay for the high frequencies through the stage mains since they travel faster then the bass frequencies. Things will sound less muddled. You can also use a 3rd and 4th speaker in the back of the room with the live mix delayed on the stage mains and the rear or mid-room speakers non-delayed. Van Halen ...


1

You don't have to modify the room to add physical damping to it. Velvet drapes absorb a lot of sound, even when they don't actually cover any surface, and would be very sympathetic to the decor. A few loose rugs covering unused floor areas, where the audience isn't directly looking at them, would also help a lot. The drapes and rugs could be put in place ...



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