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20

There are several situations where this notation makes sense in piano music. There is one note in one part, for example the melody, but several notes in the accompaniment (written on the other staff). There is a "symmetrical" arrangement of a two hairpins showing a crescendo and a decrescendo. One of the hairpins is over a single note, the other over ...


13

If you mean can one compose a melody using notes that are not defined in any recognized form of musical notation - then the answer is certainly! And if you compose a musical work that uses tones that are not defined in say 12 Tone Equal Temperament or other common tuning or notation system, there is no universally accepted way to transcribe those tones ...


13

A quick Google search which amounted to "what does a circle with a cross through it mean?" turns up this: http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/archive/index.php?t-637414.html The answer is: "Ø = half diminished, aka m7b5" This particular chord is played on piano as Credit to PianoChord.com


11

It could be argued that any digital recording of the melody in question is a notation of that particular performance: It's something that can be followed to reproduce the original performance. It can be written down (any digital recording is made of bits that can be encoded as ink on paper, if need be). Anyone with the right training and equipment can use ...


10

Sure. Here are some examples of scores by John Cage, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Cornelius Cardew - all recognized "mainstream" 20th century composers. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/5-12-examples-of-experimental-music-notation-92223646/?no-ist


9

There's no specified extra length for a fermata, so it will depend on the mood of the piece (and that of the performer!), and that can vary from performance to performance.10-20% longer would be about right. I've seen it exactly as you show, at the end of a piece, on a rest, and thought that in this case it could be a very long fermata! It's probably not ...


9

In the context of Baroque dance music or suites, then there are good reasons to use 3/8 in preference of 3/4 (or vice versa). In the days before metronomes, how the music was notated would be an indication of performance speed. The notation would also be specific to a particular dance. I have borrowed diagrams from Jan van Biezen, who has written ...


8

There's at least one case of these "impossible" crescendi that definitely isn't a mistake: at the end of the Liszt Sonata, the fifth- to third-last chords are marked pp; crescendo; ppp. The only possible realization is through gesture, and certainly Liszt was aware of this.


8

I agree with Tab's comment — this is probably an artifact from re-arranging the piece from a wind/other instrument that could indeed alter the volume at will over the duration of a single note. It could also be a poor way of indicating a transition from one volume to another, with the note being a single intermediary volume. However, if the marking ...


8

It's pretty common to change the clef in piano music. In your case, the right hand has moved in the lower range of the piano, so it wouldn't be easy to read many ledger lines below the staff. That's why the person who wrote this sheet has changed the treble clef to the bass one. You don't change octaves. The low B in the left hand is played in the octave ...


7

Cm6 is C-Eb-G-A. It's Cminor with an added 6th note. Note that the 6th note is from the major scale and melodic minor ascending scale, not the harmonic or natural minor.


6

At first I thought you were misreading the quirky script used for "Andantino". But I see that "Andantemente", "Andare" and "Andando" also appear. They all have meaning in Italian (see Google), though not generally used in musical Italian. Just Riddle (or his copyist) being a bit creative, I think!


5

Certainly current musical notation is incapable of handling note durations that aren't rational multiples of each other. For instance if you had a melody where one of the long tones was pi times the duration of one of the short tones then there is no way to explicitly notate this (it is possible to get as close an approximation as is desired though).


5

The melodies of Turkish classical, Arabic, and Hindustani have all come to terms with various means of notating their microtonal and non-Western tones and intervals, the Turkish Makams being, probably, one of the best of such systems. Still, all notation is just a guideline. Instruments that play glissandos by sliding on strings or by any other means ...


5

I don't have any examples, but there are melodies (possibly stretching the definition of "music" a bit) composed mostly or solely of "effects", like "a crashing glass", "a gunshot", "a ringing telephone", "a low moan", "the sound of a cat" etc. You could adapt standard notation for it, but a great part of your music would be in the "legend" (which effect ...


5

"Andando" does mean "walking" both in Portuguese and Spanish, and is used to describe the Andante tempo marking in common words, but as far as I know and have ever seen, the word is not used as a substitute for the traditionally instituted Italian words. Incidentally, there is a link between Riddler and the Portuguese culture, as his major 1956 hit Lisbon ...


5

I'd read that as the composer wanted you to really make that pause important. So take your time with it, especially if it's in between two very different feeling parts of the piece. (Fast to Slow section, major to minor, etc) Since there really isn't an official length to hold a rest with a fermata do what feels right.


5

When the Mordent sign is used in front of the note it actually indicates a slide. If you can excuse the poor photo of the source material I think it can still be of some worth to you. It says the following... THE SLIDE. This is written as a Mordent sign before a note, and consists of the two notes below the principal note taken consecutively, and leading ...


4

I do not believe, except maybe in rare instances, that staffs that large were used. You may be thinking of Lute tabs. All early music scores were written by hand. It's very time consuming to do this and they were after the most efficient use of space. This is why the 4 line staff with clefs and ligatures were used. I would start, of course, start with ...


4

Usually this happens when the piece was originally for some other instrument, and most likely for more than one. For instance, this might have been an orchestral piece or a song for voices, where it would make sense for two different voices to play (or sing) the same note. Of course, on the piano you cannot play the same note twice. So, you will only play ...


4

Cm6 is C Eb G A. C minor triad with an added sixth. It's one of the extended chords that doesn't fit into the "pile of thirds" hierarchy, it's not a Cm13 (C Eb G Bb D [F] A) with missing notes! And it's just fine in the key of G. Here's a common, corny even, useage - firmly within a G major tonality.


4

If you're just working on your "manuscript" for later final typesetting, you can of course use all abreviations that you and the typesetter agree upon. But if you're preparing a score for performance or publishing you should notate each instrument individually. Performers need to follow the score for their part, even if using (for lack of an individual part ...


4

"Loco" means "in the written octave", as opposed to shifted by some number of octaves. Such a shift could be due to 8va/8vb marks, or in this case, because of instrument transpositions. Tenor sax sounds an octave lower than trumpet, so by writing both instruments on a single staff there's an ambiguity--are those tenor sax notes in the trumpet octave or the ...


4

Since I can't attach an image to a comment: @guidot said in a comment he was "unconvinced" by non-professional engraving here. I agree that in the OP's image the ornament seems to have been "faked" (and rather crudely), but the same ornament appears in the (old, hand-engraved) Bach-Gesellschaft Ausgabe, Band 25: http://ks.imslp.info/files/imglnks/usimg/6/...


3

In general, extended vocal techniques like these are indicated via a change of notehead along with a textual description of the desired effect (i.e. "whispered", "screamed", etc). The specifics of this may vary in practice, depending on the particular needs of the piece: if there are only a few isolated effects needed, for example, they could all be marked ...


3

Phrase marks are usually indicated by a curved line similar to a tie or slur: As mentioned in the comments to your question, using this symbol could lead to confusion as it is used as a bowing mark in string music: However, the convention of using the curved phrase mark is well-known and if the phrase mark is 'not logical' as a bowing mark, then it will ...


3

It is indeed half-diminished. A diminished chord has root, m3, b5 and bb7. In F#o it'll be F#, A, C and Eb. The half dim., a.k.a. m7b5 differs only by the m7; E instead of Eb. Its 1st inversion is the root (inversion/position) of Am6.


2

Not really, because notation systems have always evolved to accommodate the music composers are writing. Baroque composers, particularly French ones, came up with all kinds of weird notation, some of it unique to the composer. An example: La Sylva by Forqueray (pg. 37 of this document), written in the 18th century. The information about what the odd ...


2

This is apparently a rather carelessly produced version, since the composer's name is spelled wrongly! She is Imogen Heap, not Imagen Heep. So it's probably not worth trying to guess why the music is written the way it is. But this notation does sometimes occur in keyboard versions of music that is in several melodic "voices," for example a piece that was ...


2

Yes, according to the most common use of such symbols, in popular music and jazz transcriptions, Cm6 would be C minor chord with an added 6th (i.e. a natural A). The figure 6 (written as superscript) can be used to mean a first inversion of a major or minor chord, but that is usually in the context of the so called "roman numeral analisys" of tonal harmony. ...



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