Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

You retain the accidental. In this case, it is pretty unambiguous since the lead note is immediately preceding the note (baroque trills would even start with the upper note). If there is more of a distance to the preceding use of a changed pitch, one would lean towards adding a reminder accidental to the trill.


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


7

These are mensural time signatures. Before I explain their general meaning, I would just note that these signatures should not be used without extensive explanation unless you're notating specifically for an early-music group. They are not often taught outside of grad school History of Theory type courses. Mensural music was composed in Europe during ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


5

The problem is that this is not a common notation, and the meaning of the symbol "C/Em" is unclear. What Lilypond can do - as you know - is add a letter after a slash, e.g. C/E, which means that you're supposed to play a C major triad with the note E in the bass. What does exist are polychords where two different chords are stacked on top of each other. ...


4

In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


3

Study the 5/8 measure and determine the subdivision. Commonly, it'll be 2+3/8 or 3+2/8. For conducting, you'll treat 5/8 like a 6/8 pattern, but dropping the appropriate 8th notes to match the subdivision.


2

First of all, it should be noted that the edition you have picked is no paragon of typesetting. All of the notes are there, but... The time signature has been changed from 3/8 to 3/4, with all note values doubled. This is probably to avoid scaring beginners with intimidating-looking notes that look short or fast. The eighth notes are beamed in pairs, ...


2

This is an unmeasured tremolo between notes, as indicated by the two bars between the notes. You would perform this by alternating between the two sets of notes as many times as you can in the given duration. You can read more about tremolo at this page


2

Notes that are played at the same time are represented at the same horizontal position; another way to say this is that the note indications are "stacked" vertically with respect to one another when the notes are to be played at the same time. In your example tab, none of the notes are played simultaneously. Here's a strummed open E chord (all notes played ...


1

Tab is read from left to right - just like this sentence. If two or more notes on different strings are to be played simultaneously (or several strings strummed), they will be stacked in the same vertical plane. Try to picture an imaginary vertical line moving from left to right across the lines of tab. As this line moves across the tab, it will ...


1

Like the other answers, I don't know what your notation is supposed to mean, but you can get (almost) anything you want using "chord name exceptions" to define your own markup. To repeat, I have no idea if the notes c e g b are what your chord notation is supposed to mean - but if you only want chord symbols, the notes don't matter much. \version "2.18.2" ...


1

I guess, I'd just write "(hummed)" instead of (or in addition to) the "mmm" ... That should be clear.


1

The slash is a slide (specifically a slide down) and the note you see is a half rest. It is just like any other slide except you just do not end your slide on a note you just rest instead. In this case you would start from the 12 fret and slide down and eventually rest. A slide like this is just used for effect and there are slides that do the opposite ...


1

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...


1

To quote from the competition: those are mensural time signatures. Basically, they are symbols from an earlier time period where notation values tended to be more ambiguous but still more rigid than Gregorian notations. Of the mensural time signatures in use then only the ones for 4/4 and alla breve have survived in modified form. All the others are now ...


1

Theres that big curved line, I think its a slur, right on top from bar 1-4... does that mean I hold the sustain pedal down for that whole bit? That is called a legato phrasing mark. In bar 9 and 10 there is a "1 block" and a "2 block", I googled it and (correct me if I am wrong) but that means when it repeats play the "1" the first time and ...


1

I've never used this feature, but Sibelius has support for syncing with the ReWire protocol. This enables you to run Sibelius and a DAW (such as Ableton Live) on the same computer simultaneously and in sync. So you could play audio loops in Ableton Live in sync with playback of Sibelius notation and its virtual instruments, and quickly go back and forth from ...


1

Tenuto is a notational device to make it easy to add selective legato within a phrase. The tenuto mark indicates that the note is to be sustained as long as possible before the next note is articulated, in whatever way is appropriate for that next note. Legato just means "do that same thing for every note for the entire length of this phrase". As an ...


1

In the DelCamp edition, measure 25 has a C VII above it. The use of a barre at this point isn't just a tone preference; it's required by the notes. The notes are: B (1st string, 7th fret - only place to play this note) F# (2nd, 7th (can't play this at the usual string 1 2nd fret) D# (3rd string, 8th, finger 2, also displaced and so on) B (4th string, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible