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15

That means on the first and third repeats, play piano (quietly), on the second repeat, play forte (loudly).


14

May I suggest that it is not an 'x' per se, but actually two lines clarifying the voice leading for the top voices. Such lines are found in the first two bars as well.


7

If you compare your edition with the first edition here http://imslp.org/wiki/Special:ImagefromIndex/67715 you are right, it's a weird sign for a double sharp. I've never seen one like that before.


5

I don't entirely agree with the other answers I see here. From my experience, as well as looking at quantization values offered in DAWs, a swing feel can be varied, sometimes based on genre but other times based on the style of the players and/or composer. The concept of swinging is that the note value that is swung, in your example the 1/8 note, is pushed ...


5

Whole notes should appear near the beginning of the measure. When other notes are present, it should be vertically aligned with the first note/rest in the bar. This is a good example from PianoAndSynth.com: You can see that each first note is approximately the same distance from the left barline or key signature, whether a whole or otherwise, and no ...


3

Try something like this: It separates out the main voice, and, by two means, shows that it is emphasised. It's also relatively neat.


3

For something that specific (based on reading your comments) and extra-musical, just write that in plain English right into the score ("lift hands"). It sounds like you're trying to choreograph actual physical movements, which is beyond what is typically done in the score, and there is no sure way to communicate that through traditional musical notation. ...


3

Use a smaller note head for the non-melody notes. This would be easy to sight read. Or you could write an additional ossia-type line showing just the melody notes. In either case, an explanation won't hurt. If you only need it for this one measure, you can just write it out: "highlight notes such and such".


3

The three notes of the appoggiatura take time away from the following note (the D), not the preceding one. As per http://www.ars-nova.com/Theory%20Q&A/Q94.html: "Double appoggiatura" and "triple appoggiatura" are names for pairs or triplets of grace notes that are played quickly at the time of the primary tone that they precede. When written as ...


3

This isn't going to be played with mathematical precision. Along with the "smorzando", the choice of note value indicates a relaxed tempo related to the preceding 16th note, rather than something twice as fast. As you say, there is plenty of information in the rest of the notation.


3

I've just gone through a number of baroque books and looked at buying the Neumann book mentioned above (Not going to happen at that price though). I finally found the answer though at http://baroqueguitar.homestead.com/The_Baroque_Guitar.htm which states that the bracket means a mordent. I hope this is helpful to anyone else who has been puzzled by this.


3

If you listen to the recording, the melody voice in bars 88-89 really goes f f f g g g ees c' | g ...; this is probably a way how the author wanted to present this fact, using voice/staff switching lines. It would have been actually better to use the proper notation of the leading voice:


3

There is a difference between "conventional musical terms that were originally Italian" and "the Italian language". A common example is "con sordino" with a mute or "sordini" (plural) - the "correct" Italian is sordina/sordine, but most musicians either don't know or don't care whether their mutes are grammatically masculine or feminine. Another is "D.S. ...


2

The duration of the beat is set by the tempo marking, usually an italian word like lento, andante, vivace, etc. that you may have noticed at the beginning of musical scores. These words correspond to an approximate setting of beats per minute (bpm), that you find for example in wikipedia and is usually also marked on the scales of metronomes. But the ...


2

If the song is swing or jazz, then most likely yes. Some sheet music will have a marking at the beginning of the song, which will read "Swing Feel" or "eighths (quavers) should be played as triplets" (Like in your example).But most sheet music won't have these markings, it is implied though, since most swing and jazz music are played using this swing feel. ...


2

Here is sort of a skeleton to work with. But the title of your question and the tags you use are completely useless for finding this question and/or related issue on StackExchange ever again. You should seriously spruce them up. Even then, this question might have been better asked on the LilyPond user mailing list. And all the involved features are ...


2

I think the neatest way to do this is almost what you did in your example: use a different style of notehead for the emphasized notes. Of course this breaks "the rules" about note lengths, but it should be obvious to most players what it means. You could add a note explaining that the "white" noteheads in the chords should be emphasized. Incidentally, ...


1

I would certainly read it as: Start accelerating at the accelerando so that you are playing at a moderato tempo when you get to the moderato, then continue to play moderato until you reach another tempo marking or the end of the piece. That might not be exactly how others play it, and every performance involves interpretation of the score by the ...


1

You want the keys pressed for a short time, so write a short note. You want the pedal to hold the note, so write a pedal line. If you want staccato impact, add a staccato dot.


1

The suggestion by Patrx2 is quite neat, but here's another technique you can use to indicate this kind of voicing. Obviously, if you are writing for (human) voices, you can simply split them onto separate staves, but if the notes are to be played by one hand on the keyboard, it is not very friendly to split them up. On the other hand, if this can be ...


1

I'm going to go against the grain here with some tough love. If you're not the composer, then kindly disregard. The primary issue in my opinion isn't how to notate this, it's how to avoid making decisions that leave you in this position. This isn't laziness - it's good form. The composed music itself should be clear enough on its own so that the performer ...


1

Is there a full 4/4 bar before each pickup? In that case it will have to be a 1/4 bar. But this is rare. Maybe you're following a pattern (common in hymn tunes) where each line has an anacrusis but there are no extra beats. Often this is notated with a split bar, often with a line break.In this case no extra time signatures are required.


1

I've a feeling that you are using anacruces, which are the pick up notes, often of one beat. You MAY just find that the rest of that particular bar still exists, but nothing is happening in it. So, three beats of rest and the one beat anacrucis could be what you need to write. If the pulse of the piece is interrupted for this bit, then I'm wrong. If it ...


1

If you're putting an extra beat in then yes, the proper way to notate it is to have that measure in 1/4 time. Also note that the following measure, if its in 4/4, would need to have the new time signature notated as well. That is, one would have to write the next measure with a 4/4 time signature.


1

Bob Broadley's answer shows the best that most (commercial) notation programs can do without "faking" the output, but in complicated situations this style of notation can be easier to read: The notes in the tuplets are spaced relative to the other notes in the score as if the bar-lines did not exist. (Note, the image was requested by the OP to explain my ...


1

Other answers have mentioned that these are ornaments. As such, try not to think too much about how much they are actually 'worth' in terms of note length. Here is what I hope is some practical advice on playing them. Hopefully it's not too odd! I agree that it might feel 'right' at first to want to play the three-note ornament before the beat, but as ...


1

In the fourth bar of the same Chopin prelude you also find something equally suspicious from the point of view of modern notation practice. There it's seven notes written with a single beam even though their duration is just a quarter note. You'd understand it from context there as well. Septuples can be confusing, and many people mistakenly would write, ...


1

I wonder, did you mean the dot to be AFTER the third quaver (eighth note), rather than as a staccato mark? If so, the two are different. In the first example, the single beat is split into 3 equal parts, and in the second, the dotted quaver is three times as long as the last quaver, assuming the last quaver is actually a semiquaver (16th note), otherwise it ...


1

It could be some type of ornament from the baroque or renaissance period. It would help to identify the piece, the composer, and the edition of the music the example came from. The sign is certainly included in the recent comprehensive standard for music fonts - see glpyh U+E572 here: https://w3c.github.io/smufl/gitbook/tables/other-baroque-ornaments.html A ...


1

One beat is as long as the composer says it will be. Usually signified at the beginning of a piece with 'bpm', This stands for beats per minute, so if it stated 60bpm, there would be one beat every second.A tune twice as fast would be 120bpm. No-one actually times abeats per se, but instead would use a metronome to set the speed of the piece.It's also very ...



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